Shop now Shop now Shop now  Up to 50% Off Fashion  Shop all Amazon Fashion Cloud Drive Photos Shop now Learn More Shop now Shop now Shop Fire Shop Kindle Listen with Prime Shop now Shop now

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars245
4.7 out of 5 stars
Format: Kindle Edition|Change
Price:£4.99
Your rating(Clear)Rate this item


There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later.

on 5 September 2013
I'm giving a review of the whole series so forgive me if not a specific review to this book.

I read the books themselves a few years ago in paperback and loved them, and recently needed something for my kindle whilst on holiday and decided to reread them - and I'm so glad I did, if anything I enjoyed them even more this time around and read the 5 books back to back.

To me this really is story telling at its finest - they may not be 100% accurate in terms of historical facts and Iggulden does indulge some theories of his own where history doesn't have the answers - but who cares!! This all adds to the enjoyment of the read. The story of the Mongols and the manner in which Temujin becomes Genghis, uniting the tribes under one banner is electrifying. The hardships he bears, from the betrayal of his mother's family, that result in the death of his beloved father, to the betrayal by his father's bondsman and his own older brother, shaped this man to become one of history's most brilliant, most brutal and most effective warriors and leaders. The story told here of how Genghis, along with his brothers, took tribes of wandering nomads and turned them into a terrifying war machine, that conquered and forged the largest empire since Alexander the Great.

Though Genghis had no interest in the mechanics of governing the nations he conquered, the Khans that followed him did and set in place changes that affected the World to come. And but for the unfortunate death of Ogedai Khan, who followed Genghis, and the fact that the Tumans (armies) had to come home to take part in the ceremonies involved in naming a new Khan, the Mongols having reached as far West as Poland and Hungary, under the brilliance of General Tsubodai, would have gone on to conquer through the lands of Austria, Italy and maybe Germany and France. No other armed force at this time was able to stop the Mongols, their tactics and weapons beyond anything else the Western powers had. The Mongols were the original architects of the 'lighting war', using speed and surprise to vanquish their enemies, tactics adopted by the Germans hundreds of years later, the blitzkrieg. It is one of history's biggest 'what ifs' - if Ogedai had lasted a year or so more, just how far west would the Mongol armies have conquered, and how much different would history have been?

The books are breathtakingly at times, the battles, the conflicts, the loss of life. But they are also full of beauty, humour and triumph, and show that the Mongols were not the uncultured, unintelligent savages that perhaps history sometimes makes them out to be. The stories involving Jochi, his first born son are heart breaking at times, as are the parts where Tolui gives his life for his Khan and older brother Ogedai.

The books end with probably the most famous Khan after Genghis, Kublai Khan, coming to power having vanquished his own brother. The Mongols are at the height of the powers and are at this time are still force under one man. This is not how it remains for long and there is undoubtedly potential for another whole series of books telling the rest of Kublai's story, about the Golden Horde in the northern landscapes of Russia, and how the Mongols help to shape events in the Islamic world of central Asia. And of course how Kublai Khan went on to play such a crucial role in China - a land that Genghis had tried to destroy and obliterate, his grandson went on to build up into a world power.

I really hope Conn Iggulden does go back to the Mongols and offers us more of his brilliant story telling. In the meantime I urge you to read all of the Conqueror series, they are a fantastic read and books you will want to read again and again.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 19 October 2008
I was going to give this book 4 stars, but I read the last half in 24hrs, I feel that any book that can draw me in such as this deserves a 5 star rating. It really is an epic story if you read and enjoyed'Wolf of the Plains' then you will love this. I particularly like that the story does not just focus on Genghis in fact there are times where the story leaves him behind and follows his brothers journeys, what's surprising is that the book is all the better for this.

In short it's well worth a read you will not be disappointed. Enjoy.
0Comment|One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 19 October 2008
I was going to give this book 4 stars, but I read the last half in 24hrs, I feel that any book that can draw me in such as this deserves a 5 star rating. It really is an epic story if you read and enjoyed'Wolf of the Plains' then you will love this. I particularly like that the story does not just focus on Genghis in fact there are times where the story leaves him behind and follows his brothers journeys, what's surprising is that the book is all the better for this.

In short it's well worth a read you will not be disappointed. Enjoy.
0Comment|One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 10 September 2008
This book is "un-putdownable". On a purely historical note it taught me new facts about Genghis Khan, but the whole tenor of the story shows him as a blood-thirsty thug and yet a brilliant tactician and leader. It is this absolute blend of leadership with tyrrany that engenders a (grudging?) admiration for the man.
On another level - it is a brilliant piece of writing and an adventure book to thrill.
0Comment|16 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 25 August 2010
A fascinating insight into the lifestyles and battles of the mongol hordes and of course their infamous leader Genghis. Conn iggulden perfectly captures the ethos of the mongols and their need not for wealth as this had no meaning for them, just the freedom to raise livestock and travel freely in their country of birth without the pressure to change to live a more "modern/wealth" driven lifestyle which was enjoyed by the mighty chin empire. A rollercoaster of a read, much recommended.
0Comment|One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 29 June 2009
Having read the first novel in this series and been pleasantly surprised I was not expecting this to be as good. Thankfully Iggulden does not disappoint and this novel continues where the first left off, with the same fast pace, easy story-telling and fantastic characterisations. Don't be put off by the dark cover - this is a colourful and exciting novel that will have you gripped whether you are a lover of history or just a fan of a good story, brilliantly told.
0Comment|One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 29 February 2008
Having united the tribes into the unified nation of Mongols, Genghis Khan and his brothers lead their great army into the land of the Chin. They encounter a new type of warfare, besieging great cities with high, strong walls and massive defensive weapons.

Keeping the tribes united is a difficult task and relies upon the brains of the great khan combined with his, sometimes shocking, ruthlessness. It works.

There are many sub-adventures, and there are new surprises for the reader around every corner. The only constant is the cunning plotting of the shaman, Kokchu, who is feared by all, even Genghis.

Once again, Conn Iggulden sweeps the reader along with his wonderful descriptive story-telling. The only disappointment for me is that, having finished this book, I am going to have to wait for the third and final instalment.
0Comment|5 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 9 December 2008
This is the 2nd book in the series about Gengis Khan and is better than the first - more action and large battles and less details about the hardship of living in (what is now) Mongolia. If you read the first book this is a no-brainer - you will want to read this one as well. This book can be read out of sequeance but I gurantee you will end up getting the first one as well to see how he got here!!!!
0Comment|One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 18 February 2009
This is a great second novel from Con Iggulden, it's rare that I read a book that is as well written and just a very satisfying read. I couldn't help but smile after reading this and the previous book in this trilogy, learning about this amazing and complex historical figure. We get to see an in depth look at the man who was a husband, a father, a brother and a friend and then we get to see the brutal warlord who is the leader of the tribes who shows no mercy and who's brutality is renown.

This novel brings Genghis out of the Mongol steppes and leading his nation towards their ancient enemy the Chin. We'll see his reaction to the first site of the ancient walls of the Chin and how he felt about the first walled cities he has seen and how he will learn to conqueror and turn them to his own will. We also see his inner turmoil while trying to connect to his eldest son Jochi who may or may not be his child. As the conquest moves East and cities and countries fall at the Mongols feet the world trembles at the thought of were they will march next.

Brilliant historical fiction, Iggulden at his very best.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 24 June 2010
Love the whole series so far - about to book the third of the trilogy. Fast paced, human and a great way to learn a bit of history.
0Comment|2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse

Send us feedback

How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you?
Let us know here.