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18 of 20 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Thought provoking
I enjoyed this book very much. Similar lines to Forbidden Archaeology but much much easier to read. One added bonus, it also talks about alchemy and reincarnation.
I found it to be one of the most enjoyable books I've read being both interested in archaeology, prehistory and spiratuality. One thing for certain; while it critises archaeological and anthropologist...
Published on 14 Jun 2001

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22 of 22 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A bit disappointed
I have read a couple of Baigents books - "Holy Blood, Holy Grail" and "The Messianic Legacy", and it is clear that he is more knowledgeable on these matters than on ancient mysteries and early history.
The book is not terribly well written, and his treatment of the matters at hand is superficial and based on just a few sources, all of which supports his views. Most...
Published on 12 Mar 2003 by Thomas H. Frandzen


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22 of 22 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A bit disappointed, 12 Mar 2003
I have read a couple of Baigents books - "Holy Blood, Holy Grail" and "The Messianic Legacy", and it is clear that he is more knowledgeable on these matters than on ancient mysteries and early history.
The book is not terribly well written, and his treatment of the matters at hand is superficial and based on just a few sources, all of which supports his views. Most of the supposed mysteries in the book are much better dealt with by authors such as Robert Bauval and especially Graham Hancock, both of whom are also cited in "Ancient Traces".
This book is only recommendable to those who has never read any other books about Atlantean theories, the age of the pyramids, erosion of the Sphinx, and so on. Whereas it is not very interesting to the "experienced" mystery-"lover", it does after all introduce the reader to a host of mysteries, and may spark an interest in the subjects.
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18 of 20 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Thought provoking, 14 Jun 2001
By A Customer
I enjoyed this book very much. Similar lines to Forbidden Archaeology but much much easier to read. One added bonus, it also talks about alchemy and reincarnation.
I found it to be one of the most enjoyable books I've read being both interested in archaeology, prehistory and spiratuality. One thing for certain; while it critises archaeological and anthropologist institutes for dismissing evidence of ancient sites and artefacts which suggest that man is much older than conventional view allows, it does not dismiss any evidence excavated from sites accepted by 'conventional' experts either which some books of this type unfortunately does. In other words, it is not too one sided but I am rather skeptic over the 'evidence' that humans may have lived at the time of the dinosaurs. Perhaps those footprints were exterrestrial?!! It certainly wouldn't be an easy life to co-exist with the likes of T-Rex and raptors for any of those who saw the film Jurassic Park.
I would recommend it but only to broad and open minded people.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A good starting point for delving into alternative theories on our past., 11 Feb 2012
Ancient Traces is a useful book for anyone wanting to begin to explore a less standard view of our origins and the abilities of our oldest civilisations. By providing examples which challenge accepted knowledge, Michael Baigent shows that our established view of early history is clouded by professional prejudice.

The first chapters look at how old humanity may be, and through well defined instances, throws doubt on the establishments dating. The book then focuses on anomalies within our scientific understanding of evolution and reveals that our true origins cannot be fully explained using the adopted methods that we have, up until now, relied upon.

The chapters dealing with the "Suppressed facts concerning ancient mankind" and "Where did our civilisation come from" continue to reveal occasions where evidence exists that bring conventional views into question. By looking at Atlantis, the Pyramids and the Sphinx, Michael then pulls together the idea that our history is skewed by profesional bodies trying to keep their theories intact, despite evidence to the contrary.

This book delivers an interesting mixture of facts and an extensive bibliography which is a good starting point should you wish to read further into the subject matter. It gives an overview rather than indepth research and is a great addition to your library if you are looking to expand your understanding of our ancient past.
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2.0 out of 5 stars Not deep enough, 4 Jun 2014
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Not very good, a lot of information but no clear order. This book is friendly enough but has a habit of just not being as fluid as other works.
It is a good book if you're starting out in this or similar topics.
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5.0 out of 5 stars An eye-opener, 8 Dec 2013
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A great book that makes you think about the world we live in. You thought you had a good idea about our history> think again!
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4.0 out of 5 stars a good read., 13 May 2012
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Sauniere (West Yorkshire) - See all my reviews
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I remember finding this book years ago in the local library when i was younger, it was a great introduction to ancient mysteries and a great read. Each chapter is self contained and subjects vary from cryptozoological mysteries, atlantis, evolution mysteries and a number of others.

I bought this book as soon as i could and its a good guide to ancient mysteries.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars BOOKSHELF ESSENTIAL, 7 Mar 2008
By 
J. Ware - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This book brings several disciplines together - gathered around the idea of hidden history and philosophies. It has a good index and most things are referenced. Mr. Baigent pulls his punches a good deal but has created a jumping off point to explore further. His sense of the english language is a delight. I think it is a must for that quick reference and also when you want to share a thought with a sympathetic fellow traveller.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars rubbish- humans did not co-exist with dinosaurs!, 9 Sep 2008
Tosh and not even well written tosh. Read Chariot of the Gods if you want the good pseudo archeology. This is just silly and would not, unlike his other stuff, even make a good novel. Poor waste of money. Insulting to the painstaking work of biologists and historians. Utter foolishness.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A bit disappointed, 12 Mar 2003
I have read a couple of Baigents books - "Holy Blood, Holy Grail" and "The Messianic Legacy", and it is clear that he is more knowledgeable on these matters than on ancient mysteries and early history.
The book is not terribly well written, and his treatment of the matters at hand is superficial and based on just a few sources, all of which supports his views. Most of the supposed mysteries in the book are much better dealt with by authors such as Robert Bauval and especially Graham Hancock, both of whom are also cited in "Ancient Traces".
This book is only recommendable to those who has never read any other books about Atlantean theories, the age of the pyramids, erosion of the Sphinx, and so on. Whereas it is not very interesting to the "experienced" mystery-"lover", it does after all introduce the reader to a host of mysteries, and may spark an interest in the subjects.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars not very good......., 17 Oct 2007
By 
M. shaw (uk) - See all my reviews
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a few brief chapters that take a glance at things like living but lost prehistoric species,pyramids,reincarnation and archaeological anomalies without a coherent thread between any of them.Contains an interesting bibliography which is a redeeming feature.I would rather read Graham Hancock and this quality of author first.
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