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122 Reviews
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Wonderful
All Roald Dahl stories are fantastic for kids, and in my opinion, this is one of the best! a classic tale that was made into a wonderful film.
I think ANYONE could read this story and love it. Adults and children alike!
Published on 30 July 2009 by Luna

versus
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Ok.....ish
This was the first Roald Dahl book ive read to my daughter that i couldnt wait to finish. Both of us found the singing centipede particularly irrittating to read/ listen to.
Published 9 months ago by Stephen & Amelie's books


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5 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars class 3's book review of James and the Giant Peach, 12 Oct 2006
By 
Ms. Julia D. Kitson (Salcombe Primary School, Devon England) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This book is about a boy called James who lives with his aunt Spiker and Aunt Sponge because his parents were eaten by a gigantic rhino. There was also a ladybird, spider, glowworm, centipede and a grasshopper.

We liked the part when James met the bugs and how they grew to be human size.

We liked the book because its has lots of funny parts, like when the centipede asks James to take off all 42 pairs of his boots!

We also liked the part when the giant peach crashed in to the chocolate factory and everyone was swimming in chocolate.

The part when the characters eat the peach made us feel hungry.

I is also funny when the two aunts get squashed by the peach.

We recommend this book for any age children who enjoy fantasy stories with lots of laughs.
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3.0 out of 5 stars Three Stars, 6 Oct 2014
Not same cover as photo online but good quality product nonetheless
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent book!, 13 Jun 2012
By 
D. Garwood "Dave" (South Wales) - See all my reviews
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Purchased this as the first of many Roald Dahl books as my son has arrived at a suitable age already. He really enjoyed this story as I did back in the day. Looking forward to purchasing more Dahl books now...
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5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars, 13 Aug 2014
All good. There really is nothing to add.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Giant-Sized Adventure for Enormous Fun!, 8 Aug 2004
By 
Donald Mitchell "Jesus Loves You!" (Thanks for Providing My Reviews over 124,000 Helpful Votes Globally) - See all my reviews
(HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)    (TOP 500 REVIEWER)    (VINE VOICE)   
Researchers constantly find that reading to children is valuable in a variety of ways, not least of which are instilling a love of reading and improved reading skills. With better parent-child bonding from reading, your child will also be more emotionally secure and able to relate better to others. Intellectual performance will expand as well. Spending time together watching television fails as a substitute.
To help other parents apply this advice, as a parent of four I consulted an expert, our youngest child, and asked her to share with me her favorite books that were read to her as a young child. James and the Giant Peach was one of her picks.
The book is a wonderful witty exploration of the marvels of imagination as applied to nature. Every reader will look much more closely at the world around after finding so many interesting details to consider.
The story begins when James Henry Trotter was about four years old. He had been living happily with his parents in England. One day, they went shopping and were eaten by an angry runaway rhinoceros which had escaped from the London zoo. As a result, their wonderful home was sold and James Henry Trotter came to live with his decidedly dastardly aunts Sponge and Spiker. They mistreated and overworked James Michael Trotter much like the abuse that Cinderella experienced at the hands by her evil stepmother and stepsisters.
Poor James! He has become the most unhappy, lonely, and woebegone orphan in the world.
But his luck changes when a mysterious old man gives him some magic, in the form of wriggling little green things to put into water and drink. Then their magic will help James. "Whoever they meet first, be it bug . . . or tree, that will be . . . who gets the full power of their magic!" James is told to hold the bag tight and to hurry. But, alas, he trips and the contents of the bag spill out underneath the old barren peach tree in the yard. Quickly, the magic seeps into the ground as James scrambles to retrieve it.
Soon, the aunts spot a peach growing in the very top of the tree. And it keeps growing . . . and growing . . . and growing . . . and growing . . . until it's the size of a house. They concoct a scheme to get rich by charging admission to see the peach, while James is to stay out all night cleaning up the mess the visitors have made. Tired, he decides to look at the giant peach. He notices a hole, like a giant worm's tunnel in the bottom. He climbs in. What he finds leads him on one of the most amazing journeys that any 7 year old has ever had or imagined!
This story has a lot in common with Alice in Wonderland. Everything that happens prior to going through the hole in the peach is but a preamble for the role reversal in which the peach and the insects inside of it are made to be enormous. This is like Alice drinking the potion that makes her small. Yet the rest of the world stays its normal size. Basically, this is an encouragement to take the qualities of peaches and insects more seriously by exaggering their significance. You will learn a lot, and be charmed by how the information builds the story.
Along the way, Mr. Dahl asks some very interesting questions:
How do grasshoppers make sounds?
What benefits do earthworms, lady bugs, and spiders bring for people?
How many legs does a centipede have?
He also provides many fantastic explanations of natural processes, introducing cloud-men to make rainbows, hail, and rain. These are great fun and help develop the story.
Whenever James seeks to create a balance in and with nature, things work just fine. A good example is that he uses filament spun by the silk worm and the spider to tie to gulls who carry the peach aloft over the ocean. Harness just the right number of gulls and progress is smooth. Harness too few, and nothing happens. That subliminal message is a valuable one for every reader.
The ending is particularly fine for expanding on the concept of how each being's peculiarities can be strengths. The book appears to draw on The Ugly Duckling story for inspiration. Even James' loneliness serves him well, in the end.
I also like this story for its potential to inspire writers. Walk into your kitchen, and pick up the first item you see. Then build a story around it, like Mr. Dahl has done with this peach. If you do this with a child, you will both be the richer for the experience.
After you are done enjoying the story and writing your own, I also suggest that you think about ways that you can live in greater harmony with nature. What aspects of your life would you have to change? How could you be as useful to nature as the earthworm is to the farmer? What gratifications would you feel from doing this? Spring will be coming in a few months, and the opportunity to do some organic gardening using the materials in your own yard will be there. Plan to get closer to nature, and make notes about what you observe every day. You will enjoy great peace as a result. If you haven't read Thoreau recently, this would be a good time to do so.
Have a peachy time!
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5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars, 13 Sep 2014
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Ideally suited for children good buy
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3 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Not Just for the young ones, a timeless classic, for ANY age, 6 Feb 2001
By A Customer
Not Just for the young ones, a timeless classic, for ANY age
A Great, Descriptive, imaginative read
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A peach of an adventure, 1 Feb 2008
This book is a fictional fantasy adventure.

There is a boy called James Henry Trotter : he lives with his wicked aunties , called Spike and Sponge, but he really wants to live in America. One day he meets a magic man who gives him crocodile tongues. He spills the tongues on the ground. The very next day a giant peach grows on his aunty's tree. One night James creeps out of the house and gets inside the peach. He has adventures over the ocean. Near America he defeats the Rhino that killed his parents, then lives with the insects in New York.

The two main characters are James and the Grasshopper. James is young and enthusiastic but can also be sensible and very clever. He enjoys the company of the insects and is not scared of them, because he is brave. The Grasshopper is also sensible and intelligent. He is old and wise and can play the violin well. He is the leader of the insects.

My favourite character is the Ladybird because she is quite stupid which makes me laugh. I think she is a good friend to James because she is really kind.

I like the book because it is really action-packed and it never bores you, for instance when they come to the frozen bit of the Atlantic and battle with dead pirates.

I would recommend this book from age 6-12 boys and girls.

Georgie
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2 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The best childrens book ever, 30 Nov 2000
By A Customer
This book is brilliant and helped me to understand my childhood. James is a lovely little boy who you can only want the best for. He is frightened of a few things, hippos and his Aunts among them. One day he has a chance to escape in a giant peach which has become a tourist attration in the time it took to grow. James escapes inside the peach with an assortment of scary creatures. When I first read it I was aghast at having to spend so much time in such a small space with, among others, a huge spider! I soon got over it as the warmth which Roald Dahl gives to the spider made me forget my own very real fear. This book should be compulsorily read by all adults every year so as to remind them of how they used to dream.
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5 of 9 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Anisa and Karlos' book review, 23 Jun 2006
By 
The book that we're reviewing is James and the Giant Peach and written by Roald Dahl, illustrated by Quentin Blake. Personally, we believe that the genre is fiction, adventure and comedy. What is more, the setting is inside the ostentatious colossal peach.

This book is about a boy called James whose parents have died and he has to live with his sinister aunts. One day, he meets a man who tells James all about some crocodile tongues and tells him how to escape. James finds a colossal peach growing. Inside, he meets big but friendly insects. Subsequently, the adventure begins....

The characters are: James is the main character and leader of the gang, Centipede is a scallywag and comedian, Grasshopper is a musician, Miss Spider is forlorn, Silkworm is rather lazy (she was forced to help her friends lift the peach), Earthworm is a cantankerous bug, Glow-worm is a massive torch, Aunt Spiker is as lean as a sausage, Aunt Sponge is elephant sized and Ladybird is serious.

James' relationships with all the characters are dissimilar. James doesn't get on with his aunts. Conversely, he does get on with all the insects (especially the Centipede). James' strongest relationship would be with Centipede for the simple reason that he is James best friend.

As a final point, we think that this book is suitable for 3 year olds and upwards and it should be sold in the finest bookshops and libraries in London because it is really funny. We recommend this book and give it a 4/5. This book had us captivated throughout while reading it so you will be captivated too when you read this out of the ordinary book. Join in the adventures with James seeing sharks, seagulls, cloud men and lots more when you read this book!
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