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14 of 14 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars At last, a return to form for Dean Koontz
Ever since Dean Koontz's books started being released one every six months instead of one a year, the quality of his work has fallen considerably - not surprising really when you consider that he must be rush-writing to have such a high output.

His recent books have been patchy at best, and at worst they have been almost unreadable (the astoundingly awful...
Published on 20 July 2006 by Mr. T. S. Guy

versus
9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars OK, but ........
This is a decent effort at a sequel and my gripe is not with the story, which is ok. The idea and character are fine. Its the execution that is so poor.

Koontz style and characterisation are beginning to wear me down. With exception to the villians (who are always 100% evil but one dimensional) why is every good guy so nice!, and not just pleaseant nice, but...
Published on 18 Jun. 2007 by Simon Edwards


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14 of 14 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars At last, a return to form for Dean Koontz, 20 July 2006
By 
Mr. T. S. Guy (London, England) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Ever since Dean Koontz's books started being released one every six months instead of one a year, the quality of his work has fallen considerably - not surprising really when you consider that he must be rush-writing to have such a high output.

His recent books have been patchy at best, and at worst they have been almost unreadable (the astoundingly awful "Frankenstein: City of Night" being one of the worst books I've ever read, let alone the worst by this author). One of the few bright moments in his career of late was the thoroughly enjoyable Odd Thomas, and this sequel doesn't fail to impress.

Picking up six months after the events of "Odd Thomas", "Forever Odd" sees Odd in a new and equally unusual situation. Although far-fetched, this book is actually more believable than a lot of Dean's recent output, and the characters are warmer and more engaging, particularly Odd. The new character of Datura is also well-handled and she makes a welcome addition to this story.

In recent years, it seems to me that Dean's books have contained more references to God and more jokes with each passing release. This holds true in Forever Odd. The religious aspects are a touch annoying to your average atheist reader, although they are not over-bearing, and far from evangelical. They just feel a little out-of-place. As a comedic writer, I actually feel Dean is developing quite a gift; this is one of the few ways in which his work has improved in recent years. In this book I found myself laughing out loud on more than one occasion, whilst still gripped to the storyline and turning the pages at an alarming rate.

All in all, this is one of Dean's finer releases in recent years, alongside the prequel "Odd Thomas". Beyond these two I would recommend going a little further back in his bibliography, and try "Strangers" or "Fear Nothing". This book has restored my faith in one of my favourite authors, just as I was about to give up on him.
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars OK, but ........, 18 Jun. 2007
By 
Simon Edwards - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This is a decent effort at a sequel and my gripe is not with the story, which is ok. The idea and character are fine. Its the execution that is so poor.

Koontz style and characterisation are beginning to wear me down. With exception to the villians (who are always 100% evil but one dimensional) why is every good guy so nice!, and not just pleaseant nice, but quirky, annoyingly nice.

This detracts from the story, there is no grit, no hard edge to anything here. While the subject deals with serious issues of death, loss and grief, it all feels rather like a cartoon. THe last 15 or so chapters were all padded out with waffle, and the book could have been 100 pages shorter, and would have flowed better.

The worst part by far was the victim (Odd's 'brother', who was so important to him, didn't even manage a mention in the first book), only appeared because Koontz needs the token 'kid with a health problem' character. What next Dean, conjoined twin detectives?

Odd Thomas is a great character, but the series could have been so much more. The shame is that Koontz is churning out a new book every six months for whatever reason (only he knows)and the downside is the quality.

Velocity and The Taking (in particular) are real stinkers, and don't even warrant a review.

p.s. Yes Dean we heard you when you said Odd was a 'short order cook' in the opening chapter, please don't feel the need to repeat in every other chapter from then on.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars More of the same.. MUCH TOO SIMILAR TO FEAR NOTHING, 14 July 2006
This review is from: Forever Odd (Hardcover)
3 stars, because I can't give 2.5

OK, first of all- I am a HUGE Dean Koontz fan. I started with 'From The Corner Of His Eye' and proceeded to read (and buy) every novel printed and have enjoyed each one.. again: I am a fan- but this is not a good review I'm afraid...

Odd Thomas was an intersting purchase at the time- a good story- nice character, quirky (dead Elvis-classic), funny and sad.

I was surprised however, when Mr K's website announced that Odd Thomas had generated the MOST amount of post/mail about a book/character ever... I mean- it was a good book..but..

So- a sequel comes along- and you buy the book because it's a new Koontz novel- thinking right, we know who it is, what he does, what happens now?

And that's the trouble. It feels like the next episode in a tv series. The story does not match it's predecessor at all- in fact it's a little silly- and it lacks any emotion. Here's the REALLY big problem: I found it INCREDIBLY similar to Fear Nothing and Seize the night' for example: Mysterious pets, belonging to mysterious owners. The quest for a missing friend, running around and being chased at night..

I just felt I read it all before.. which was disappointing. I would not read it again I think - and hope he moves onto the much rumoured 3rd book in the Moonlight Bay Trilogy.

Better luck next time...
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars not bad, not amazing, 14 Feb. 2007
Being a huge Dean Koontz fan and having read Odd Thomas, the first book, I was slightly disappointed with Forever Odd. Don't get me wrong it is a good book but not up to par with Odd Thomas.I found the book padded out slightly and whilst reading it i found my mind wandering off the story due to the slow pace that some parts were written in. A must read for all Koontz fans but not one of his best!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Odd by name, odd by nature., 19 Mar. 2015
By 
FallenGrace (UK) - See all my reviews
(TOP 1000 REVIEWER)   
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This review is from: Forever Odd (Kindle Edition)
Forever Odd is the second book in the Odd Thomas series, the first being...Odd Thomas. This series is my first experience with Dean Koontz and I found the initial book to be a nice surprise full of unique, and often funny characters as well as some touching moments. Forever Odd isn't quite as good as it's predecessor to me but is still an enjoyable book with some great ideas.

Set not long after the first book Odd is still reeling from events but trying to get on as best he knows how. Woken up in the middle of the night by his doctor, now a ghost, Odd follows him to find he had been brutally murdered and his son Danny, a close friend of Odd, is missing. Using his supernatral abilities Odd gives chase after the villains of which the lady is an amusing yet sinister basket full of crazy.

The basic story is good as are the locations Odd travels through and I rather liked the main villain. The conversations between characters are still witty and often funny but the problem is there isn't enough of that. Odd spends an awful lot of his time in this book alone and the pace feels pretty slow in the middle as he tracks the culprits who have taken Danny. The end sequence is all pretty interesting, it just takes it's time getting there.

All in all it was still a pretty good novel i'm glad I read, and if you liked Odd Thomas than it is worth reading on to Forever Odd even if it isn't quite as good.

+ Nice plot premise.
+ Crazy villain.
+ Odd is a great character.

- Awfully slow in the middle.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Familiarity breeds contempt?, 13 Dec. 2006
By 
Deanne Dixon "deanne9499" (Sunny South Shields) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
"Odd Thomas" is your typical anti-hero. A man with "ambitions" to work in a tyre factory, clinging to the memory of his lost-love and surrounded by colourful, if not flawed, friends, he is a character we can all relate to. What sets Odd apart from "the man on the street", however, is his ability to communicate with the dead - the premise upon which the trilogy is set.

Briefly, "Forever Odd" starts with Odd encountering the ghost of the local doctor. On further investigation, the ghost is merely warning Odd that his stepson, and Odd's lifelong friend, Danny, has been kidnapped. As the story unfolds, we begin to see the negative effects of the publicity that inevitably came with Odd's apparent heroism in the first of trilogy when he rescued many from certain death in the massacre at the mall. It is Danny's loneliness and Datura's Nietzschean "will to power" that provides the fundamental story-line for this book.

For me, although the book is enthralling and Koontz has captured the spirit of Odd as introduced to us initially, there are two major problems with the book as a whole: the notion of familiarity and the stigmatism that comes with being a sequel. Prior to developing these points further, I will warn you that I am about to discuss the finale of the book, so in typical "Ten-O'clock-News"-before-"Match-of-the-Day"-fashion, "IF YOU DON'T WANT TO KNOW THE SCORES, LOOK AWAY NOW"! The notion of familiarity can be seen in two ways: firstly, in the conclusion to the book. For me, the twist was slightly predictable - primarily because it was the inevitable mirror-image to the climax of "Odd Thomas". In the first chapter of the journey, we are led to believe initially that Stormy (Odd's partner) survived the massacre at the mall, when in fact she didn't. Here, we are led to believe that Odd doesn't survive the fight with Andre, when in fact he does. Furthermore, I can't help feeling that Koontz feels somewhat obligated to inflitrate his books with authors. I may be wrong (and further reading may prove this) but out of the five books that I have read by Koontz - four contain lead characters who are authors. Whilst the old adage rings true - "you should write about what you are faimiliar with", the inclusion of another author, albeit an entertaining one, was somewhat predictable.

As regards to the problem of being a sequel, some may feel that the book is lacking in any real depth for any characters other than Odd. My "better half" read this before me and warned me that there is no time to "settle into" the book, as you hit the ground running with the story-line. This is true - although I don't necessarily feel that this is a criticism, afterall, how many people who have read the first book would complain at being given an introduction to Odd's life again? This point is valid too when you consider the lack of attention given to Odd's companions (I can't exactly criticise Koontz for repetitiveness then complain that he isn't developing character's that we are already familiar with!)

For those of you who do not know what the third book is called, try not to find out until you have read "Forever Odd" - if you do, you will be able to predict how this book REALLY ends.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars More action, less charm, 2 Nov. 2006
Odd Thomas is back in this action packed sequel and this time he is up against a gang of satanic kidnappers. The story starts at a sprint and never lets up for the entire 12 hour timeline, with Odd transforming into a sort of supernatural John McClane. Unfortunately this non-stop, Die Hard style action means that all of the brilliant supporting characters from the original are reduced to cameo roles, which is a pity because they are sorely missed here. So then, this is the Odd Thomas' show and like the original novel it is written in the first person, but as we know there is an afterlife we can never be confident that he will survive the adventure. The second sequel is about to be released and its title "Brother Odd" offers a clue to the conclusion of this book, I just hope some of the original's charm returns with it.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Entertaining enough, 13 Dec. 2006
By 
SonicQuack (Essex, UK) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)   
Koontz's sequel to Odd Thomas is a short read. You can read the synopsis above so I won't reiterate that, but what is worth adding is that the structure to this tale is cleverly conceived. You arrive at what seems a final scene only half way through, which in turn creates an interesting page turner. You'll never be quiet sure in which way it will turn, it's a very different book from the first and could quite easily stand alone. In retrospect, Forever Odd is comparible to a supernatural Die Hard, which is no bad thing. It's never a rollercoaster, and there are times in which Koontz rambles a bit, but most of the book is tightly written. There are also some parts of the plot which seem unneccesary, either utilised for padding or for preamble to the next installment. Worthwhile reading.
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4.0 out of 5 stars WELCOME BACK TO ODDSVILLE!!!!!!!!, 20 Feb. 2015
By 
Greggorio! (Amazing Australia) - See all my reviews
Book two of this remarkable supernatural fantasy series opens with Odd Thomas still grieving for his one true love, and still dealing with his talent for being able to see, and communicate with, the dead members of society. The writing by Mr Koontz is still just as extraordinary. The sense of beauty and literal poetry shines off my kindle screen brighter than the self lit screen of my paperwhite. For example, taken from the opening sentence of the book, no less:

“Waking, I heard a warm wind strumming the loose screen at the open window, and I thought Stormy, but it was not.”

And from location 59 we have: “Holding my breath, I lay listening to the silence, and felt the silence listening to me.”

How can you not be impressed by this? We are reading a horror novel here, people!

Back to the plot... A vicious and blood thirsty murder has occurred in Pico Mundo; the father of a physically and intellectually disabled little boy was beaten savagely both before and after death. The dead victim makes contact with the story’s hero (Odd himself) and it is not long before he (and the reader) is on the scent. It turns out even Odd can be wrong sometimes and it almost cost him his life right at the book’s opening act. The suspected killer has escaped with a young boy (who is a child hood friend of Odd’s) in tow and Odd is hiding in the pantry of the crime scene, knowing full well the actual murderer is standing only a scant few feet away. Turn the page, refresh your kindle screen, and we see how Odd is tasered nearly to death by the bad guy. But before the reader knows it, Odd is back on his feet and running hell for leather to get back into the scent of the killer.

The problem for Mr Koontz with having developed such a strong and attractive tie between two gorgeous young individuals and basing the story around them, only to kill one of them off in the way he did at the end of book one, is that it leaves a gaping, gaping, gaping hole in future books for him to fill. And filled it he has, but certainly in the early stages of book two, he has opted to fill it with mourning, feelings of regret, inward soul searching and philosophical debates on the meaning of life of everything and everyone who is lucky enough to find themselves living in the anti-metropolis that is Pico Mundo.

The trouble is, the story is not as entertaining, lively, and plain old fun as book one was. ODD THOMAS is a classic. FORVER ODD is not.

But its still a great story. Anyone who read book one would have fallen in love with the entire town of Pico Mundo and the reader can’t help but feel for those that are still mourning their lost loved ones. And the victims of the crimes that occur in this volume are sure to be attached to your hearts sooner than the reader realises. So follow the plot (and hold on tight) as it twists and turns and twists again. Naturally you want to read through to the finale in order to learn exactly what happened to everyone. And to see if the bad guys get what they deserved. Fortunately for the town, Chief Porter survived his own brush with death from book one, so he is the same old hero he was. Or is he?

Will Odd catch the bad guy, or will Death beat him to it? Does Odd’s childhood friend get saved before much more trauma is inflicted upon his poor, innocent soul? And who else in the town becomes the target of crazed, psychotic would-be killers who have lost the ability to reason and see sense amongst the good citizens of the world?

Read this fine book and discover the answers to these (and many more) questions yourself. But just don’t expect Odd to ride off into the sunset with a brand new sweetheart at book’s end. He is at peace with himself, the town of Pico Mundo.

And he has made peace with his demons as well as the ghosts of his past, and of course that includes the soul to the girl he was destined to be with forever.

But will the reader find themselves at peace with this book?

That’s not for me to say. I give this book four stars but it really is only three point five.

BFN Greggorio!
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3.0 out of 5 stars Forever Odd - Never Great, 10 Sept. 2008
You cannot fault Koontz with his writing style or his fantastic ideas.

Here, the 1st-person narrative continues to brilliantly define Odd Thomas as a character, and a variety of set pieces, including the opening scene, are compelling and clever in the way they open questions and promise great mystery for the story ahead.

Whereas the original Odd Thomas managed to build mystery and deliver payoffs at a steady pace, Forever Odd never quite delivers on its promise. The problems with Forever Odd are entirely plot related. The villain doesnt get anywhere near enough space on the page. There are unanswered questions and loose ends aplenty by the end of the book. Too many loose ends can ruin the reader experience, even if the preceding story was enthralling.

The secondary character in this story is a supposed childhood friend of Odd Thomas - named Danny - but the introduction of Danny feels a bit, well, odd, because I dont recall his existence in the 1st novel, and his presence in the Odd Thomas Universe feels rather forced. On the flip side, various established characters from the 1st novel get shoe-horned into the final act of Forever Odd, while others get major roles in the opening but then dissappear for the rest of the story.

I wanted to know more about Odd's nemesis in this story, and more about Odd himself, but I feel I learned nothing new about him by the end of the book.

All that said, the narrative is typically snappy and well paced by Koontz, and the characters very likable. I had hoped for a bit more explanation of Odd Thomas and some discovery of the reasons behind his supernatural skills, as well as a bit more of the Bodachs - which were sadly absent from this tale.
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Forever Odd
Forever Odd by Dean Koontz
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