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108 Reviews
5 star:
 (55)
4 star:
 (17)
3 star:
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36 of 36 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Compelling
I must admit that I have now read Parade's End twice this month, once on my kindle, and now this treebook edition. I also watched the BBC adaptation, which I quite enjoyed. There are a couple of things to be aware of though if you are reading this for the first time, this isn't really a book that you can easily read whilst commuting (I will come to why in a moment), and...
Published 24 months ago by M. Dowden

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64 of 67 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Garbled text
This Kindle edition may be cheap, but it's hopelessly garbled. After the first few paragraphs the text starts to get out of order (as you can see by comparing with other Kindle editions, e.g. Everyman or Swift).

For example we have:
"Nevertheless Macmaster moved in drawing rooms that, with long curtains, blue china plates, large-patterned wallpapers and...
Published on 29 Aug 2012 by EalingMan


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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars bring your own proofreader, 11 Sep 2012
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This review is from: Parade's End: Some Do Not...; No More Parades; A Man Could Stand Up - ; The Last Post (Kindle Edition)
On my kindle, at least, this edition is not the garbled mess it seems to have been for others - but it is desperately in need of a proof-reader. The publisher should be embarrassed to have released it.

The five-star rating is for the novel not the publisher.
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18 of 20 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A good work spoiled..., 17 Aug 2012
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This review is from: Parade's End: Some Do Not...; No More Parades; A Man Could Stand Up - ; The Last Post (Kindle Edition)
This review is for the Penguin Kindle version. I have found this book to be mesmerising and am unable to put it down. The characters may not be likeable but you can't help wanting to know what happens to them.
The writing is faultless but penguin should be ashamed for this digital effort. The pages are full of silly errors. puctuation and places where words are obviously scanned in wrong. It detracts very much from the story and makes for a very shabby product.
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24 of 28 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The greatest English novel of the 20th century, 11 Jun 2009
By 
Mr. Kevin Wilkins (Coventry, England) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Parade's End remains the most unknown, underread and yet greatest English novel of the 20th century. Only Proust's masterpiece can rival it in world literature of its time. Ford was undoubtedly a flawed genius but in this novel sequence, along of course with The Good Soldier, he attained an unequalled peak of perfection. To embark once again on this masterpiece is to enter a world peopled by the most extraordinarily well realised and vividly drawn characters and to follow a tortuous and harrowing journey to a deeply satisfying resolution. Sylvia Tietjens is most surely the greatest monster in English fiction but Ford's mastery is such that even in the end one cannot condemn her utterly to the hell she so richly deserves. Yes Christopher Tietjens' unrelenting good behaviour almost drives one to distraction but he is the solid centre around which all the other extraordinary characters revolve in their dance of death. Whole passages of these books are breathtaking in their total mastery, the closing section of No More Parades for just one instance as Christopher and General Campion confront each other in a titanic battle of wills, ending in the relief of the kitchen inspection. There is not a weak passage in the whole sequence though, even in the often derided slow diminuendo of Last Post which brings peace and resolution of a sort to the hero and heroine, rendered more poignant by the knowledge that in Ford's real life that very relationship which is celebrated in Parades End was already falling apart.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Best compilation, 21 Jan 2013
By 
Avid Reader (Vienna, Austria) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Parade's End (Paperback)
Looked for all Ford Madox Ford's books in one tome & this is the best option. Print very legible size, no too small, brings story from beginning to end (4 books in 1).
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A pleasure to read apart from the errors, 10 Dec 2012
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This review is from: Parade's End: Some Do Not...; No More Parades; A Man Could Stand Up - ; The Last Post (Kindle Edition)
I found this book intellectually challenging, psychologically perceptive, comic, historically interesting, vividly descriptive and a pleasure to read. It is often obscure, repetitive, digressive, verbose and sometimes politically incorrect but convincingly conveys the activity of human minds and emotions. I was on occasion temporarily puzzled but always finally received answers and never lost my way completely. While the characters are eccentric and often extreme, there is authenticity in their characteristics which gives, despite the historical context, universal appeal. The machinations of those with power, wealth or influence have resonance today. Accounts of conditions in the First World War are painfully memorable, whether it is life in the trenches or the behaviour of those uninvolved in the fighting. I have never read scenes of such heartrending horror as those at the front.

The presentation of disappointed love, social cruelty, kindness to the disadvantaged, tormented religion, ruthless self-regard, failed communication, corruption, class distinction and moral courage is spellbinding and all delivered with stylistic gymnastics. I have no hesitation in saying this is great literature.

My only complaint is the lack of proof-reading in the Kindle text. It is full of errors that are distracting and irritating.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Great literature, irritating and annoying product, 18 Sep 2012
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This review is from: Parade's End: Some Do Not...; No More Parades; A Man Could Stand Up - ; The Last Post (Kindle Edition)
I was prompted to read this tetralogy by the recent BBC production 'Parade's End' (which I have recorded to watch after reading the book) and a couple of TV biographies of the author. It would be a great read but the quality of the text is very poor. It is littered with typographical errors, no doubt originating from defective scanning and processing of an earlier printed edition, and has clearly not even been subject to a spell-check let alone proof reading. There is no real excuse for this in the 21st century, it is just sloppy and uncaring. Many of the errors could have been caught by a simple spell check - e.g. 3 successive commas ,,,. The problem is compounded by the fact that FMF uses many words that are archaic and/or obscure and do not appear in the Kindle dictionaries, so you are left wondering if you are looking at such a word or a typo. I notice that this edition seems no longer to be available so I can only assume that Amazon have realised it is so poor. Perhaps they will let all purchasers have a replacement copy so that we can read it again without irritation and annoyance...?
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17 of 20 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars One of the greatest stories ever, 15 Feb 2009
By 
Ronald Fraser (South Ayrshire) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
I first came across Ford Madox Ford only last year while reading the biography of George Orwell by Gordon Bowker in which he noted that Orwell loved the writtings of Zola and Ford, among others. I find that that I now am also a fan of those writers. I first read The Good Soldier which was excellent and could not wait to start Parade's End. This book is so good it is a puzzle as to why Ford is not better known. Ford excels at jumping back and forth in time without the reader losing track of the story, and this is a story that is designed to enthrall the reader from page one.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Flawed perhaps, but mesmerising, 10 Sep 2012
It is not often I feel drawn to write a review, especially as I am still on the third book. This is my first experience of Ford Maddox Ford, but after a radio discussion rating him as one of the great writers of the 20th Century, I wanted to see what all the fuss is about. I am also interested in the very differing reviews here. Firstly, the Kindle version is badly produced, with many typos. However, I am not sure if my download contains garbled text and for 77p - I am certainly not complaining, not when trite production line best sellers are demanding ridiculous prices for an electronic download.

I still can't decided whether this is the work of an unsung and largely forgotten genius, or whether his obscurity is well deserved. All I know is that for two days now - I have been unable to drag myself away from my Kindle. I wake up early and start to read, and hours have passed in utter absorption.

No - it is not an easy book. The reader has to work at it - and for modern audiences used to quick and easy character studies and linear plot lines, it is a challenge. But imho - it is well worth it. There are echoes of Joyce in the thought streams of the protagonists and the nightmarish and hallucinatory scenes in the trenches are extraordinary.

I would write more, but I really need to get back to my Kindle and find out what happens next.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Book Review: Parade's End - Ford Maddox Ford, 10 April 2014
This review is from: Parade's End (Paperback)
Although Ford did not attend University like some other well known authors of the time. His writing style is typical of that era and is intellectually a match for those educated to a higher level. It is stated that Parade's End is based on Ford's own experiences at war. The novel is made up of four books: Some Do Not; No More Parades; A Man Could Stand Up and The Last Post.

The books are quite difficult to read due to the 'padding'. By 'padding' I mean that there is lot of detail on the main characters thoughts and musings. I was pleased to have seen the TV adaptation before reading this novel. I think I may have struggled to keep up otherwise. Especially, as it took me nearly two months to read. This was due to time constraints and is not a reflection of the novel. If the story just stuck to action then it would have been at least half in size, but the poorer for it.

Christopher, married to a woman who could be described as the 'devil incarnate'. So malicious and vindictive was she towards him. She went on what could almost be called a rampage to discredit and ruin him. Yet, he had married her taking on her child not knowing if it was his. He would not divorce her out of principle, he would not discredit his wife. Of course, divorce was not the done thing and would have reflected badly on him. Sylvia Tietjens was a Catholic and divorce was against her religion, she would never have agreed to it. This is the basis of the novel and what follows unfolds in the story . Christopher may be naive but he is a good sort, yet he suffers more than anyone. It is a tale of its time but is packed with social, political and moral issues. If you have the time to invest in reading this tome, it is worth your while. Enjoy!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars parades end on kindle, 25 Sep 2012
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This review is from: Parade's End (Kindle Edition)
BBC adaptation prompted me to buy Ford Madox Ford's novels on kindle. Efficiently delivered as usual with kindle. Arguably best critique of the Great War,Ford's novel also presents a picture of the society of the early 20th century in turmoil. An absorbing and thought provoking read.
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