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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 17 October 2006
i have read all of the emperor series by conn igulden and found them all to be extremely interesting,i did not want to put the books down and hopefully igulden will write more about roman characters.the battle scenes are marvellous as if you were stood there in the massed ranks of the legions,you can feel the atmosphere of battle and the apprehension.ceasar is well versed in the ways of war as are his friends.this is no comic book story but i believe a very true account of life fighting with the legions.a real eye opener,i do hope there will be more from igulden.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
Conn Iggulden establishes himself as one of the best writers of our time with this captivating final book. We have now learned of the life of Julius Caesar from his childhood up until this final stage of an amazing man's life.

In this book Julius Caesar returned from his conquest of Gaul must now defeat one last enemy before he can rule all. He must now defeat Pompey his ex-college and one of the best generals of this time. Pompey's army superiorly out number Caesar's veteran Legions. In this epic lead up to the final battle we learn of Pompey's crippiling fear of what Caesar can do, and the betrayal of Marcus Brutus one of Caesar's closest friends.
Iggulden can capture the last moments of Caesar's life with such conviction that you can't put the book down. Once you start to read you get so engrossed that time loses all meaning. With the series finished I can not wait for his work on Gengas Khan. So in summary if you have been following the books this is a must read.
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8 of 10 people found the following review helpful
VINE VOICEon 14 October 2006
If you have read none of the previous 3 books in the series then, please, don't start with this one - there will be much of the detail which will pass you by.

There will be few surprises for those of us who have read the whole series, the same style, the same breakneck pace and a familiar portrait of the flawed leader. Obviously, this rounds off the story, from the crossing of the Rubicon to the murder in the steps of the Senate, and to some extent, because this is a relatively well known part of the story, the author is up against the readers preconceptions in this volume.

He does OK, though in parts I did wish for another parallel tale which might have shed more light on other characters - something which happened in earlier volumes to great effect. By the end Caesar seems to have cast off all the interesting characters around him - that's the problem with megalomaniuacs I suppose!!!!

For me, the first 2 books were the best in the series, but if you have read and liked those then you really had to/have to read to the end
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on 27 February 2013
I was initially sceptical when I first found out about this book series (of which there are four books) as I was a huge fan of the Game of Thrones books and thought that nothing could capture my imagination as they did, however I am pleased to say I was completely wrong in being as sceptical as I was. I have to say I found these books enthralling and couldn't put them down. Now remember that this is a work of fiction based around the true events of Julius Caesar's life so if you're looking for absolute facts then you will be disappointed but I have to say that the author filled in the blanks beautifully and I found myself captivated and very involved with the characters and indeed missing them when the inevitable happens. I highly recommend this entire series and you will want to read them again and again.
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7 of 9 people found the following review helpful
Iggulden's EMPEROR series has led the field in the recent spate of Roman-themed novels. Authentic, yet gripping, psychologically probing, yet action-packed - page-turners that stayed with the reader long after putting down the book. That said, this final entry in the series is a notch down on the previous books - while lavishing detail in places, he seems to rush certain key sections, in particular in the ending. The conclusion seems added in haste, leaving the reader somewhat deflated and dissatisfied. Also ending the novel with Caesar's death means leaving other important characters, especially Brutus hanging. Most will know how ultimately the fates of Brutus, Mark Antony and Octavian play out, but it would be better to have these laid out, if only in synopsis form. A follow-up novel, or series would be welcome, rather than his planned Gengis Khan books.
That all said, Iggulden's prose remains as readable as ever, his action crisp, his character sketches vivid (especially the pathetic Pompey and his tragic undoing). Gripping, evocative and enjoyable -this is historical fiction at its best.
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on 25 May 2015
Another fantastic book, clearly there are some discrepancies between fact and fiction but Conn makes an entertaining book and most people who read historical fiction know that it is fiction! However the thing that did annoy me was the relationship between Caesar's daughter and Brutus. There was no need for it,in fact it hindered the story even if Caesar didn't have much to do with his daughter he would have furious that his best friend had bedded her just to spite him. So that has made me drop a star from this book. Later almost as if Conn realises what he has done he drops Julia from the book and she isn't heard about again.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
on 22 August 2007
When I was a young lad my mother always tried to inspire me to read historical fiction, like she used to do. I never did, always too buried in adventure and sci-fi novels. It was what could be that mattered to me - not what had been. Though I would stress that my all time favourite movie as a kid was 'The 300 spartans', that the Beeb seemed to broadcast every summer holiday after 'Why don't you' and 'the flashing blade' !!

So a while ago I decided to change that. I decided to interlace my eager habit of post appocalyptic, warhammer and zombie fiction with fiction based on historical events. And the Emperor series is where I began.

For people who want to adhere 100% to history then maybe this series is not for you, and at the end of the books Iggulden states what he has changed and added to make the book more entertaining.

Anyhow, from the first book in the series I was hooked , and read the first three one after the other. The books are all adictive, smooth to read and hugely entertaining. I felt like I truly cared for the characters in this book, and stayed up on many a night to see what happened. The mix in these books between warfare, politcal intrigue and Julius's and Brutus's own life were well mixed.

However, for me, this the last in the series - although Iggulden states at the end of the book he may continue the series to tell the story of what happened to Caeser's assassins at a later stage - was not quite as good as the three previous. The book is about 507 pages long, and it is only in the last 50 or such that Julius starts wanting to become 'King' of Rome, and tells quickly of the plot to kill him. Maybe Iggulden was presurised by the publisher into finishing, but I felt the end was a little too hurried.

One othe thing I would like to point out, is that many people will have bought these novels after watching the TV series 'Rome'. In my own opinion you may be a little confused as the characters do not match the TV series. So in your best interests, leave it a while before letting your imagination take over from the goggle box !

I will certainly read more historicial fiction by Iggulden. But to those people who are writing bad reviews of this book as is it not 100 % accurate I would say to you get a non-fiction book, an author has to be able to take some liberties !!

RIP mom ! I think you'd be proud of your little boys book habits now !
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 16 April 2009
Conn Iggulden is a wonderful writer and this book was no exception, he brings the characters to life. I could not put this down, cant wait for more from this writer.
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on 25 June 2011
I thoroughly enjoyed the Emperor series, which I bought on the strength of the superb Conqueror series. Mr Iggulden plays fast and loose with history to produce an exciting action adventure.
I was inspired to find out more about Julius Caesar and Ancient Rome in general, just as Bernard Cornwell got me hooked on the Peninsular War. I highly recommend Adrian Goldsworthy's "Caesar: The life of a colossus" and Simon Baker's "Ancient Rome: The Rise and Fall of an Empire".
If you're a Sharpe fan, don't miss Mark Urban's excellent "Rifles" (non-fiction).
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6 of 8 people found the following review helpful
on 9 January 2006
Normally I wouldn't touch this style of historical fiction with a bargepole, the factual innacuracies tend to irritate me immensely, however a friend bought me 'The Gates of Rome' and 'The Death of Kings' which I raced through, for once able to accept the books as fiction inspired by fact rather than distorted truth. I bought the last two in the series for myself and was greatly looking forward to this final installment.
Like the other titles in the series, it is compelling reading. The prose flows smoothly, the characters are lifelike and identifiable with. The 'action' alternates between artistic description of war (almost dance-like) and the graphic brutality synonymous with the period. The clash with Pompey in Greece makes lively and intriguing reading and the pursuit across to Egypt enlightening. Not knowing a great deal of Caesar, aside from the basic story, I wasn't greatly aware of his time spent in Egypt and it made interesting reading.
With all that said, I felt the final few chapters let the series down. The assassination of Caesar was dealt with far too swiftly and I felt the author missed out on the opportunity to offer more insight into the personality of Brutus and the turmoil of his relationship with Caesar.
But all in all, an enjoyable read and if you've started the series, I recommend you see it through to the last!
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