Shop now Shop now Shop now  Up to 70% Off Fashion  Shop all Amazon Fashion Cloud Drive Photos Shop now Learn More Shop now Shop now Shop Fire Shop Kindle Shop now Shop now Shop now

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
17
4.3 out of 5 stars
Your rating(Clear)Rate this item


There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later.

on 6 November 2007
This selection gives 28 pages to the early 1890's Decadent period, 41 pages between 1900 and 1917 when Yeats felt his verse growing more assertive and definite, and then 139 pages for the remaining Modernist period from 1917 till the poet's death in 1939. In fairness, the selection reflects the quality of Yeats' writing throughout his life rather than any bias on the part of Webb. Yeats himself said "as I look back upon my own writing, I take pleasure alone in those verses where it seems to me I have found something hard and cold", a reference to the complacently dreamy verses of the early Crossways, still to be found lingering round the corner of The Lake-Isle of Innisfree.
Yeats resolved his life through his poetry, as an avid reader of Nietzsche he was constantly recapitulating, reconciling himself with his past; Ego Dominus Tuus epitomises that. He spent much energy in attempting to reconcile Ireland to an image of itself, one neither effeminately sentimental as the English stereotype made out ("always ready to revolt against the despotism of fact" - Arnold), nor as one-dimensionally political as the Young Ireland propaganda-culture threatened to make it. Poems The Fisherman, Easter 1916, September 1913, all display Yeats' construction of and frustration at Irish identity at the time. Ultimately though, it's his final concern between competing and complementary opposites, a theme developed through the spiritualism of his book A Vision, the opposition of abstract knowledge and visceral activity, which defines much of his later, modern verse. The Tower, Sailing to Byzantium, The Second Coming, and on to Under Ben Bulben, each reflect the theme of periodic revolution of opposite states; life/death, wisdom/vulgarity, quality/baseness... These are the haunting and powerful poems of a proud but aging man at war with both himself and the mediocre world of "greasy tills" he felt overtaking him.
Yeats would probably have agreed with Wallace Stevens that, "poetry is essentially romantic". Much of this selection shows his attempt to romanticise or dramatise his country and himself, his wish to create symbols of Ireland and `Yeats - the poet' that would become part of the national, almost mythological, heritage of the new Free State. For that reason the selection reads, at times, as an autobiography in verse, one in which the poet and poem fall into each other like the worlds of a Borges short-story (only 40-odd years before the master trickster himself). Brilliant stuff. Definitely recommend it.
0Comment| 15 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 8 February 2002
This book offers a fine collection of some of Yeats greatest poetry including: He wishes for the cloths of heaven, Easter 1916 and The Second Coming. This book is a must for all lovers of yeats and newcomers alike.
0Comment| 17 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 4 May 2016
Perhaps someone can let me know if I've made a mistake - but I looked up this volume on Amazon and in the Table of Contents it was clear that in some cases there was only a selection of poems from a given collection of poems (e.g. *from* The Green Helmet and Other Poems); but in other cases (e.g. the collection, "Michael Robertes and the Dancer"), the impression was given in the Table of Contents that the volume contains the whole collection (i.e. no 'from' in the Table of Contents listing - it just gave the title of the collection of poems, e.g. "Michael Robertes and the Dancer"), but poems from the collection (Michael Robertes and the Dancer) such as "Solomon and the Witch" and "The Rose Tree" are not included in the Volume. Many of the poems are meant to be read in the context of the collection of poems in which they appear. So the Table of Contents is misleading. I would not have got this volume (Kindle) if I had known that the major poetry collections were incomplete.
0Comment| One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 18 January 2015
Great poetry!
I would recommend "Leda the Swan" and "The Great Isle of Enniscorthy"
They're even greater once you deconstruct the poetry a little.
The poetry highlight Yeats' time, and the social, political and religious themes that are infused within them.
Also, beautiful and rich imagery of the Irish landscape.
0Comment| One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 18 July 2012
Yeats' poetry is powerful. His work is accessible and beautiful. However, if you buy this on kindle, some of the line breaks are odd due to the size of the screen.
0Comment| 3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 28 December 2013
It is often said that there is 'nothing new under the sun.' That is true, but few wordsmiths have been able to lay bear the certainties and doubts that bedevil mankind.

Yeats was such a man: there is beauty here, and disgust and humour at man's condition.
0Comment| One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 24 June 2015
Brilliant book; really helpful reading aid to my English university course.
0Comment| One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 8 September 2015
This was bought as a gift and was very much appreciated.
0Comment| One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 31 October 2014
very pleased with item thanks
0Comment| One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 27 January 2011
This edition covers well the Fin de Siecle period and Modernist movement in literature and focuses on what Yeats wrote during that period. In that, it is an excellent accompaniment to any student of modernism with some of the most recognised modernist poems contained in this edition, such as 'The Second Coming'

At the same time, it is a very interesting volume for the student of Irish history with this collection coinciding with the declaration of the Irish Republic, of which later Yeats became a political representative and also his poems dedicated to those friends of his that fell at this time.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse