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18 Reviews
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2 star:
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47 of 49 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The best I've ever read on this subject
Readers of history books have come to expect nothing but the best from Anthony Beevor and this is no exception. The superb pairing of Beevor with Artemis Cooper has produced an excellent account (certainly the best I've read) on France during and after the Liberation.
Cooper (a descendent of Duff Cooper, the first post-war ambassador to France) provides a massive...
Published on 26 Sep 2004

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18 of 20 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Shoddy e-book conversion of a good book
This isn't a one-star book - it's a very interesting look at fascinating times (although another reviewer here quite rightly notes that it lingers on the upper crust of society and does not feature the voices of ordinary Parisians as much as you'd expect). I'd give it four for the text.

Why a one-star review, then?

Because the e-book conversion is...
Published on 8 Jun 2011 by Moi, j'aime lire...


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47 of 49 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The best I've ever read on this subject, 26 Sep 2004
By A Customer
Readers of history books have come to expect nothing but the best from Anthony Beevor and this is no exception. The superb pairing of Beevor with Artemis Cooper has produced an excellent account (certainly the best I've read) on France during and after the Liberation.
Cooper (a descendent of Duff Cooper, the first post-war ambassador to France) provides a massive contribution to the text with the diaries and letters of Duff and Diana Cooper which inspires a wholly original and unique insight to the politics at the time.
This, added to the exceptionally accessible style of Beevor, makes a thoroughly enjoyable, as well as informative read.
The only criticism I can think of is the occasional niggling feeling at the end of the odd paragraph that the story that has just been recounted was not quite finished. This is certainly not a common occurrence and does not at all detract from the main body of the narrative.
The book covers many aspects of life after the Libreation in Paris - not just political, it also focuses a great deal on the lives of intellectuals and artists - and also gives an idea as to the suffering of France generally in those hard years.
In conclusion I must recommend this book to anyone with even the vaguest interest in French social history.
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63 of 67 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Post-war Paris in a nutshell, 12 Feb 2001
By A Customer
This well written book provides a highly amusing portrait of Paris after the war. It covers politics, literature and the night life. Sartre and all the rest of the crew. It explains why the communists are still a force in politics now and reveals a shrewd understanding of the French psyche.
It is certainly worth buying. Up in the same league as Beevor's book on Stalingrad.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Reinventing A Country, 20 Jan 2012
This review is from: Paris After the Liberation: 1944 - 1949: 1944 - 1949 (Kindle Edition)
This is a fascinating account of France on a knife edge as it tries to come to terms with the aftermath of the occupation and re-establish its shattered economy and democracy. With the war ended the glue which held together the politically disparate elements of the Resistance is dissolved, freedom fighters have to find common ground with collaborators and everyone has to try to rebuild the country against the background of British, American and Russian interference with the ever-present threats of communist revolution or fascist dictatorship lurking in the background. Modern France could have turned out to be very different to the country we now know.

The story is told largely through the eyes of socialites, diplomats and the emerging group of left-bank, left-wing intellectuals who both shape and are shaped by events. Although this range of sources seems limited, the authors successfully use it to produce a framework which clearly sets out the events of the period and goes a long way to explaining the attitudes of the society which emerges. Even if one sometimes wishes that the voices and experiences of ordinary Parisians were more to the fore, this book is a very readable introduction to how France reinvented itself.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great stuff covering the whole range of Parisian life, 15 Aug 2010
By 
John Hopper (London, UK) - See all my reviews
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A marvellously absorbing history of Paris in the final year of the war after Liberation and the immediate post-war years, covering the whole range of issues - the desperate economic situation, political chaos, military tensions within the wartime alliance and the start of the Cold War, but also the intellectual life, and the worlds of fashion, art and literature, in many cases closely tied to political developments. Great stuff.
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18 of 20 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Shoddy e-book conversion of a good book, 8 Jun 2011
This review is from: Paris After the Liberation: 1944 - 1949: 1944 - 1949 (Kindle Edition)
This isn't a one-star book - it's a very interesting look at fascinating times (although another reviewer here quite rightly notes that it lingers on the upper crust of society and does not feature the voices of ordinary Parisians as much as you'd expect). I'd give it four for the text.

Why a one-star review, then?

Because the e-book conversion is incredibly shoddy, and this is the only way to get Penguin to notice the fact. The whole text is packed with poorly converted typesetting joining words together, so you get nonsense like "itemon", "anti-clericalismon" and "telegramto" (all these in the space of a few pages: the book is full of them).

Does this stop me from reading and enjoying the text? No.

Does it make me wonder why I paid for it? Yes. Penguin are taking the cash and not bothering to send the book out for a proof read.

Come on, pull your socks up. There are good reasons why editorial standards as we understand them exist and this book doesn't meet them at all.

Mr Beevor / Ms Cooper / Penguin-Person, if you do happen to read this - please leave a comment. I'd be very interested to hear what you have to say.
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17 of 19 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Le "Tout Paris" but very few ordinary Parisians, 11 April 2010
By 
Dobester (Istanbul, Turkey) - See all my reviews
This book is really about the experiences of Paris's upper-class "gratin" and the friends and associates of Mr Beevor's wife's father, the British diplomat Duff Cooper. It becomes almost parodic in its descriptions of dinners and distressed gentlefolk, and as such is very different from Mr Beevor's previous books on Stalingrad and Berlin, which were made from the memories of people from all levels of society. It's like reading a history of London during the war written by Harold Nicholson. Elegantly written and interesting, but most definitely not a history of Paris.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Sad times., 27 Sep 2013
By 
Mr. S. Reay "moabman" (Stranraer Scotland) - See all my reviews
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So much was happening in Europe after France's liberation. Amazing to see how history was re-written by many of the French to hide the level of collaboration that actually happened. My thing is the SOE and to read De Gaulles reasons for telling agents they were no longer wanted in France was shocking. An in depth explanation of a bleak period in France's history.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Paris After the Liberation: 1944-1949, 21 Nov 2009
By 
M. Spivey (North Somerset, England) - See all my reviews
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This can be appreciated as a well-researched documentary history, but also as a gripping, absorbing read for the general reader. The writer makes it easy to imagine that you are there in Paris seeing it all happening around you, desperate to know what's going to happen next. Strongly recommended.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars PARIS AFTER THE LIBERATION, 28 Jan 2010
A really excellent read - disinterring more and more of the hidden (well, it was to me) history of that immediate post-period of French politics and society. It's another real page-turner, like most of Beevor's work (Stalingrad, Berlin etc.) I can't wait to read the D-Day book (been waiting for it to come out in paperback in all good bookshops)
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5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars, 12 July 2014
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Good condition for price
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