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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Bravo Bruce
I dont usually buy books that accompany a TV series or film, thinking of them as quite frivolous marketing ploys, however I was given this as a gift and have definitely reassessed my opinion.

The book is an insightful accompaniment to the show, delving deeper into the characters that we meet only briefly on screen.The photography provides candid shots of both...
Published on 29 Oct 2008 by Zoe Tull

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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Not bad..
Explorer Bruce Parry heads on an epic 6000km journey down the great River Amazon, giving an insight into the lives of people who live and work along its banks. With lots of photos and written in a diary entry format.

This is a good light read but is sadly nothing spectacular. There is a lot of scope for depth and discussion of the plight of all the peoples...
Published on 6 Jun 2011 by Ste to the J


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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Bravo Bruce, 29 Oct 2008
By 
Zoe Tull "zoe" (england) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
I dont usually buy books that accompany a TV series or film, thinking of them as quite frivolous marketing ploys, however I was given this as a gift and have definitely reassessed my opinion.

The book is an insightful accompaniment to the show, delving deeper into the characters that we meet only briefly on screen.The photography provides candid shots of both Bruce,the landscape and the indigenous tribes he meets.

I would highly reccomend this book for anyone who has an interest in the enviroment and what is happening in the Amazon. It is also a great Christmas present for any fans of the charming Mr Parry!
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18 of 20 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Bruce rocks!, 10 Oct 2008
In his inimitable style Bruce is bringing attention to one of the biggest scandals in the modern world, no less than the destruction of the most important habitat on our planet. It's something our generation will go down in history for and nobody is doing anything to stop it. More power to Bruce for showing how even some of the people destroying the forest are just trying to survive. We won't begin to tackle this issue until we appreciate that there are no easy answers (if you want a good summary of why the Amazon and other environments are so precious I'm a big fan of Bruce's other book Serious Survival as well).
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Food for thought, 24 Oct 2008
By 
This, perhaps unsurprisingly for followers of the series is an intelligent and thought provoking counterpart to the BBC series and another addition to the canon of admirable work Parry is undertaking. This is beautifully produced full of sumptuous photos but it does not shirk the harder issues tackled in the show. He has a knack of managing to raise awareness of all important issues without patronising or preaching. Buy. And buy Bruce's wonderful charity album too as well - might go some way to helping the human casualties of amazon exploitation - tribes.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars fabulous pictures, little depressing but enlightening overall, 7 Nov 2010
By 
Mr. M. Jones "Jonesmz" (Chester, England) - See all my reviews
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Good points: Not too much reading (more pictures than text). Fabulous pictures, revealing lifestyles a world away from ours. Very fair - gives voice to all sides in the stories - tribes, loggers, miners, cowboys, businessmen, scientists - and so gives an impression of context. In diary form, so the realities of travel come through - illnesses, tiredness, silliness and sad times. There are several points and groups that provide hope for the future. An interesting read even without the TV series.
Bad points: too much emphasis on humans, and very little on the actual Amazon forest or its wildlife (I didn't see the TV series so didn't know what to expect). A little depressing as the scale of the damage in the Eastern Amazon becomes apparent, because of past policies now running amok.
Overall: enlightening, as it gives an insight into different sides and the complications of reality over rhetoric.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Wish I'd seen the programme, 12 Jun 2014
This review is from: Amazon (Paperback)
Vividly capturing the 'benefits' of civilisation seen through the eyes of the Amazon peoples, this is a diary format story of his attempts to film a documentary series on the destruction of the rainforest. He is candid and open in his views and at times the depictions are harrowing, but this is well worth reading whether or not you saw the TV results of his endeavours.
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3 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great!, 31 Oct 2008
By 
Brought this for alot more than for sale here, from high street store. Grrrr! Anyway got to say Bruce is a legend and its a perfect crimbo present!
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The realities of life on the Amazon, 26 July 2011
By 
Peter Durward Harris "Pete the music fan" (Leicester England) - See all my reviews
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Although this book was published in support of a TV documentary series, I didn't see the series as I have no TV, and might not have watched it anyway even if I did. So when I saw this book at a bargain price, I wasn't sure what to expect. I correctly assumed that it was about a journey along the Amazon in which the author discussed what he saw, but I wrongly expected that the actual journey would be an important part of the book, and there would be plenty of details about that. In fact, the whole journey had been meticulously planned in advance and the author knew what he was looking for, so the journey itself was incidental. Instead, what we get is a close look at various tribes that live there, how they lead their lives and how some are adapting to change while others have been driven deep into the forest to avoid contact with the outside world, at least for the time being.

The journey begins at the officially recognized source of the Amazon, although the river isn't actually called the Amazon at that stage. It takes the author and his crew three months to reach the point at which the word Amazon is applied. By that time, a vast number of tributaries have converged on each other. Still, the source looks quite spectacular, with water gushing out of the side of a cliff at a very high altitude.

The author and his production team illustrate with words and pictures the contrasts between those areas that were unspoiled at the time and those areas that have been affected by modern civilization. Affected sometimes means devastated, but it isn't always like that. Conservation projects have met with varying degrees of success, as at least some of the locals have learned to control fish stocks. The author discusses some of the industries that have moved into the area - oil, gold, drugs, logging and rubber among them - and the impact they've had. The rubber industry is gone now, but left its mark anyway.

The author also discusses how the locals spend their leisure time. He does not have a huge amount to say about the wildlife, but I was amused to read that the Uakari is sometimes called the English monkey, because its red face reminds them of sunburn. I had never heard of these monkeys, let alone known what they looked like, until I played Zoo World on Facebook. Yes, I can confirm their blood-red faces do make it look as if they are permanently sunburnt.

The author does not get overly political. He is in any case constrained by what he can say as he has to toe the BBC line and present what he sees, leaving others to interpret what it all means. I like it that way as I prefer to make up my own mind about things. The Amazon environment clearly has problems, but they can be solved if the will is there. If the will isn't there, people will have to adapt to whatever the consequences may be.

This book is well written with plenty of great photographs, some of which are full of fun while others are more serious - some very serious indeed. The Amazon is a unique river that tries to hide many secres, but a few of those secrets have escaped into this book.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Not bad.., 6 Jun 2011
By 
Ste to the J (Mansfield England) - See all my reviews
Explorer Bruce Parry heads on an epic 6000km journey down the great River Amazon, giving an insight into the lives of people who live and work along its banks. With lots of photos and written in a diary entry format.

This is a good light read but is sadly nothing spectacular. There is a lot of scope for depth and discussion of the plight of all the peoples living around the Amazon, from tribes who have their homes and livelihood affected by new hydro-electric dams to the farmers caught between law enforcement and drug barons. These issues and others are glossed over to the point where one begins to wonder: exactly why write a book about these topics if they aren't going to get much of a mention?

The main problem being the format for the book. Whereas Michael Palin(for example) excels in the diary format because he tends to have a short muse on the topical issues, Parry is aiming for so much more but fails due to the very nature of the book structure. What he attempts to cover in a short space is to the detriment of the warmth and humour of the aforementioned Mr Palin.

With Television being dumbed down the way has been in recent years, presumably the attitude has been adopted that the public wouldn't get anything that is to insightful and complex, so what we get in reality are Bruce's (very) short views on big and important topics, that have ramifications not just for the people of the Amazon but also world-wide.

Still it is a good primer for people who want a fair view of what is going on along the Amazon (although it could do with a decent map), definitely a springboard for those wanting to go on to a more substantial book about the same subjects.

[]
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1 of 4 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars amazon, 15 Jan 2011
By 
G. I. Forbes (edinburgh) - See all my reviews
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The authors previous book "Tribe" was appallingly bad as is this one-talk of the "cult of the personality"or the great "I am". All you get is multiple pictures of the author or "Bruce did this" or "Bruce did that"the Amazon does not get mucu of a look in.It is clear to see how the BBC wastes our money.
Some of the text ,in diary form, covers the following subjects coca,shanmas,contact,conservation,gold fever and the battle front.
The map is amateurish and most of the pictures are ofvery poor quality.
Not aook to spend any money on-a pity as the subject could have been fascinating.
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2 of 13 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Amazon, 10 Nov 2010
By 
D. Cousins "wild man" (Scotland) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Amazon (Paperback)
TV Series was good, but the book is terrible! got to about page 40 before giving up. Has gone to join the Dan Brown books that accumulate in charity shops as it's not even good enough to use as toilet paper!
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