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18 of 18 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Not just for girls
Broken families, irresponsible parents, capable but insecure 12-year-olds - the themes of Dizzy belong firmly in the territory Jacqueline Wilson has so successfully marked out as her own. If you're going to trespass on that territory, you'd better have a talent for writing.
Thankfully, Cathy Cassidy clearly has such a talent. Far from being a Wilson...
Published on 5 Dec 2005

versus
3.0 out of 5 stars It's okay...
My daughters review:
I decided to read this book after reading Cathy Cassidy's book Lucky Star and I feel like this story was a lot weaker then the sequel to this book. (I read them in the wrong order.)

Dizzy is about a girl named Dizzy who has grown up without knowing her mum. She lives with her dad and she's about to embark on yet another birthday of...
Published 4 months ago by Lisa


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18 of 18 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Not just for girls, 5 Dec 2005
By A Customer
This review is from: Dizzy (Paperback)
Broken families, irresponsible parents, capable but insecure 12-year-olds - the themes of Dizzy belong firmly in the territory Jacqueline Wilson has so successfully marked out as her own. If you're going to trespass on that territory, you'd better have a talent for writing.
Thankfully, Cathy Cassidy clearly has such a talent. Far from being a Wilson wannabee, she has a strong voice of her own which takes the story off in sometimes unexpected directions. Dizzy is a great read, with a sympathetic and believable main character plunged into a situation beyond her control, and despite the unfortunately pink cover should appeal to all thoughtful and adventurous readers regardless of gender.
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17 of 17 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A summer with a difference, 28 July 2004
By A Customer
This review is from: Dizzy (Paperback)
This book is a great read - for boys as well as girls. Don't be misled by the girly cover: there's plenty inside to interest boys too. Follow the story of Dizzy's summer, from the moment her long-lost mum turns up on her 12th birthday and whisks her away to experience a very different life from the one she had before. Dizzy encounters a whole range of new people in places she'd never known existed, she makes new friends and experiences life on the road and under canvas at summer festivals. This page-turner makes you want to read on until you find out what happens. By the end of the story Dizzy has changed in a way she couldn't have, had she stayed at home with her dad - and guess where she ends up? I'm not telling you... What are you waiting for? Read it now!
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A ragdoll, a postcard from Marrakech, a rainbow-stripe hat, a dreamcatcher and a silver necklace with a pink stone in.., 31 Aug 2007
This review is from: Dizzy (Paperback)
This was a brillant start to Cathy Cassidys books.
The charecters are so believable and the book is ace.
I would reccomend this book to girls aged 10-14
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A great book, 25 Jun 2005
This review is from: Dizzy (Paperback)
Dizzy's mum left when she was only five. Dizzy eagerly awaits the fantastic presents she is sent every year, but on date of her 12th, a shocking yet pleasing present awaits her- her Mum!
In a whisk, Storm- what Dizzy's mother calls herself- takes Dizzy to her place (although it's not quite what she expects)but not telling her dad and before the End of year Exams...!
They travel to Scotland, where Dizzy discovers her mum is a traveller.
She has a romance with a childhood friend- Finn (is that how you spell it?)- and makes new friends also.
This is a teenage masterpiece and if you're bored in the Summer hols, then read Dizzy! It will go down a treat!
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Dizzy by Cathy Cassidy, 12 Aug 2011
This review is from: Dizzy (Paperback)
Dizzy is a twelve-year-old girl who lives with her single Dad. Every year on her birthday, Dizzy receives a birthday present from her Mum, who ran away when Dizzy was four years old. This is what happened: One night, Dizzy's Mum kissed her extra hard and whispered "I love you" her ear. When Dizzy awoke the next morning, her Mum was gone.
Dizzy and her Dad managed to live together until her twelfth birthday. The morning of her birthday was going perfectly normal and included all of Dizzy's birthday traditions: cheese on toast carved into a number, depending on how old she was, a flower in a jam-jar, a banana milkshake and a tube of smarties wrapped in blue tissue paper. When the birthday girl goes down, there is usually a present from her Mum waiting in the post. But not today.
Dizzy comes home from school to find a grubby, purple VW van in her driveway. Whose could it be? As Dizzy goes into the living room, she finds a small, tanned woman sitting on her couch. She has a pierced eyebrow and about a thousand earings on the same ear.
"Hello Dizzy, Happy Birthday! Gosh, how much you've grown!" said the woman.
"Hello, Mum." Dizzy Says, through tears.
It is a birthday tradition for Dizzy and her Dad to order a mushroom Pizza, but because Dizzy's Mum is a vegan, she makes Miso soup, read-bean stew and muesli cake. During the evening, Storm (Dizzy's Mum's nickname) gives Dizzy's dad a lot to drink. This is because Storm wants Dizzy to come with her to her hippy-festivals, but Dizzy's dad disagrees. So, Storm gets Dizzy's dad drunk. Without knowing, he agrees. Dizzy is under the impression that he really has let her go, so she goes along with Storm.
At the festivals, Dizzy is re-united with an old friend called Fin. She also meets her Mum's boyfriend, Zak, along with his son, nicknamed Mouse. Dizzy becomes very good friends with Fin and Mouse but she is not too sure about Zak.
Although she was really looking forward to the festivals, she hates them. The air is always thick with cannabis and all they ever eat is peanut butter on mouldy bread. She really wishes she could go back home.
Whenever Dizzy moves festivals, she sends a post-card to her Dad. Storm tells Dizzy to always give the post-card to her, so that she can "add her own few words". But does she really post them?
Near the end, Storm and Zak travel to India to help Zak's brother to open a fortune-telling centre. While they are there, Dizzy stays with Fin, his Mum and Mouse. She likes Fin's Mum, but really, really misses her Dad. Will she ever find him?
This book made me feel sorry for Dizzy, as Storm doesn't pay attention to her, even at the Festivals. It also made me realise that there are a lot of children in this World that live like this. My favourite part was when Dizzy and Fin go to the Beach for Fin's birthday. I WISH I WAS THERE!!!!
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars This isn't like Jacqueline Wilson!, 5 Aug 2006
This review is from: Dizzy (Paperback)
I thought that the books by Cathy Cassidy were going to be like Jacqueline Wilson, but they weren't so that was Ok. They were the same subjects as her, but written in a better way. It made you feel that it was written to you, like a letter.

Dizzy is about a girl whose Mum left her when she was little. Every Birthday her Mum sends a card, but this Birthday her Mum turns up at her house and takes her away with her to lots of Hippie festivals and things like that. At first she thinks it is great, but does she really want to leave her Dad and her old life behind for this?
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3.0 out of 5 stars It's okay..., 29 July 2014
This review is from: Dizzy (Paperback)
My daughters review:
I decided to read this book after reading Cathy Cassidy's book Lucky Star and I feel like this story was a lot weaker then the sequel to this book. (I read them in the wrong order.)

Dizzy is about a girl named Dizzy who has grown up without knowing her mum. She lives with her dad and she's about to embark on yet another birthday of waiting for the post card to come from her mum to wish her something. However, when she arrives home, she fails to see a post card, but yet her mother herself! Dizzy's world takes a turn and Dizzy finds herself in the middle of a festival field, surrounded by old friends and new loves, as well as missing her dad terribly. She witnesses new highs and lows that she never thought existed and as she continues to live life as a 'crusty', Dizzy finds that the person she adored and trusted is far from what she imagined.

Personally, Dizzy was quite a weak story for me. I know I'm not the target audience for the novel, but it failed to even appeal to me as a child, so I thought re-reading it now could show some kind of connection for me. The characters were predictable and weakly built. Although it highlighted the highs and lows of festival life, the rest of the story was pretty bleak. It was mainly about a girl falling in love and despite the horrifying drama at the end, the only other issue is the fact that her mother lied to her. I like drama, but not too much, yet this book failed to have nearly enough for me. I would consider this book an extremely light read for people who just want something to read before bed. Also, although there are a lot of emotional chapters, I didn't find that this book tugged at my heart strings at all. It just made me carry on reading, waiting for something to happen - that never happened.

A great book for younger readers, definitely, but just not my cup of tea.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Deliciously Delightful Dizzy, 8 Feb 2010
This review is from: Dizzy (Paperback)
When my librarian friend told me Cathy Cassidy's books were flying off the shelves of her Kensington library, I decided to try one. As soon as I picked it up I could see why these books are popular with kids aged 8 and up.

Dizzy has just turned 12 when her hippie mother reappears after an absence of 8 years and whisks her away to the exotic world of New Age festivals, tie-dye, herbal tea and VW camper vans. Dizzy meets some wild and wacky adults and some loveable but damaged children. Sometimes the kids seem more mature than the adults. Just like real life. Dizzy has some wonderful experiences: a midsummers festival in Scotland, busking in a small market town followed by a glorious day on the beach, sleeping in a tree house under the stars. It is a world most of us will never visit but Cathy Cassidy puts us right there and better yet, makes us want to be there.

The book is full of rainbow colours, ribbons, glitter, face-paint, fireworks, salt air, chocolate, grass-stained bare feet, muddy jeans and a dreadlocked boy with amazing eyes. But the delicious descriptions never intrude on a plot that zips right along and kept me reading until 1.30am.

I can't wait to read the next one and I will carefully read them in order. Driftwood, ho!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars AMAZ!!!!!!!, 18 Jan 2014
This review is from: Dizzy (Kindle Edition)
Absolutely fab. Broke my heart.lovely words and meaning.It almost turns the pages for you.just like my life. Loved it .I love the character Dizzy because she is so kind,just like me,and would be the perfect sister to mouse and girlfriend to ...
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A book review on Dizzy by Cathy Cassidy, 18 Nov 2013
This review is from: Dizzy (Paperback)
This book my old school gave to me when I left 4 months ago, I read this book a month ago and finished it within a week, I couldn't put it down.
Dizzy lives with her dad at home in Birmingham until a mysterious van turns up on Dizzy's birthday and swoops her away to a summer holiday camp, were she meets lots of friends along the way.
I would recommenced this book to anybody 8-14 years of age.
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Dizzy
Dizzy by Cathy Cassidy
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