Your rating(Clear)Rate this item


There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later.

28 of 30 people found the following review helpful
on 19 December 1999
Having marched and fought with Richard Sharpe from the Peninsula to Waterloo and beyond, it was with great interest that I journeyed back in time with him, and indeed Wellesley, to India. "Tiger," in all honesty, I found difficult to get into, although by the end I was once more with Sharpe in the thick of the action. "Triumph," on the other hand, had me hooked from the very start, and I would say to the new Sharpe reader - start with "Tiger" and persevere. "Triumph" fills in a lot of gaps in the Sharpe story as a whole, and after that, "Fortress" awaits you - and how! By the time you have fought at Assaye, won through at Ahmednuggur, and conquered Gawilghur, you deserve a rest, and a leisurely sea-voyage back home to England. But by then the year is 1805, and you will have to sail close to the South-West tip of Spain, the cape of Trafalgar. Who knows what will happen?
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 13 January 2012
I find Sharpe's Triumph a little different to all of the other Sharpe novels because I dont think Richard Sharpe is the hero of this story. The final third of the book, which details the brutal Battle of Assaye, is very much the story of General Wellesley, probably the greatest military commander in British history.

Sharpe has his moments obviously, swinging his sword against a dozen Mahratta's and 'effin & blindin' his way towards a battlefield commission like only Sharpe can. But for me he spends much of the battle as a spectator while the Scottish regiments are being blown to pieces. Meanwhile Wellesley is making up a battle plan, fording a river and sending his small army up against the odds with the certainty that the enemy 'will not stand'.

That's not to take anything away from Sharpe's Triumph as a novel. The Sharpe series is nothing without Wellesley and I loved the fact that this book gave me a real detailed glimpse of the battle from the General's point of view. The usual cast of Cornwellian villains are there, the delightfully vile Obadiah Hakeswill, the clueless commissioned officers and the downright evil William Dodd.

As with most Sharpe books the map at the beginning is essential if you are going to understand the battle itself, and Cornwell's dramatic style of historical fiction is highly addictive. These books also inspire me to research the true story of these battles and Assaye is a remarkable feat.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 15 June 2015
The perfect companion for all historical fiction enthusiasts is THE ROMA VICTRIX WINE BEAKERCalix Imperium, Roma Victrix Pewter wine beaker

Sharpe's Triumph is the second, chronologically, of the Richard Sharpe novels by Bernard Cornwell. This is the second of the three books tracing Sharpe's experiences in India.

Coming four years after Sharpe's promotion to sergeant following the successful siege of Seringapatam, we find Sharpe jerked away from his comfortable existence in that city, and accompanying Col. McCandless, an intelligence officer we met in the Tippoo Sultan's dungeons, to capture an East India Company turncoat serving with the Mahratta confederacy's army.

The bloody story takes us through the Battle of Assaye, one of Arthur Wellesley's more sanguinary victories, fought with a lot of guts against a much larger foe.

Two of the highlights of the book are our further encounters with that malevelant bottomfeeder, Obadiah Hakeswill. This time he's engineered a dishonest plot to arrest Sharpe on a trumped up charge so he can bump him off and take the jewels Sharpe looted from the Tippoo Sultan.

This story also holds the incident in which Sharpe is promoted from the ranks for saving Wellesley's life. It is some intense, exciting action.

Sharpe's Triumph is a good read, fun stuff, a great addition to your Sharpe library.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 22 September 2010
Sharpe's Triumph is just that. Another romping story about Richard Sharpe set in the run up to and then the actual battle of Assaye in India 1803.
Shape is witness to a brutal and bloody event which he narrowly escapes from. He then teams up with an East India Company intelligence officer, Colonel McCandless, whose job it is to capture the perpetrator, Major Dodd. You then follow Sharpe and McCandless in their pursuit of Major Dodd with the action of Wellesley's forces mostly in the background. Sgt. Obediah Hakeswill threads his way through the book in his relentless pursuit of Sharpe in order to ruin him.
Sharpe and McCandless drift in and out of the action until the battle of Assaye itself when Sharpe is thrown into the thick of the battle.
Cornwell has a great talent for being able to paint the gory, dirty, violent, and smelly battles so vividly in the readers mind you could almost be a bystander. The historical accuracy is also very good and any `additions' the author made, to help the story along, are fully recorded at the end of the book.
I enjoyed this book, unable to put it down at times, and would happily recommend it.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 2 September 2011
I touched upon how this period in history does not really interest me when I reviewed the first book in the Sharpe series, "Sharpe's Tiger." Being a big fan of Bernard Cornwell though, I was pleasantly surprised. I was reliably informed that Sharpe's Triumph was not as good as the other books in the series and so perhaps it was because I had slightly lower expectations that I was again pleasantly surprised by the book. Whilst it is not a patch on the Warlord Chronicles, Sharpe's Triumph is a quick fun read. The plot is not overly complex but it is the characters that make the story. Sharpe is just one of those characters you instantly love and want to be. Other favourites from the first book are also back such as the reprehensible Hakeswill and the highly moralistic McCandless. If there is one downside to this book (and this is just a personal dislike of mine) is that there a lot of battle scenes. Cornwell writes these well, but I think his strength lies in his characters and I found myself yearning for the quieter scenes in between the action.
I am looking forward to the next Sharpe though.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
on 4 May 2009
Apparently, when asked towards the end of his life which battle he was most proud of, Wellington, without hesitation, named Assaye in 1803. Given the overwhelmingly poor odds he faced at the start of the battle and how quickly those odds were turned on their head, this seems entirely reasonable. It is presumably in honour of this achievement that Cornwell chose to focus this novel on Wellington rather than Sharpe who spends most of the novel following his General along dutifully and only getting involved in the fighting towards the end. This is not really a criticism. The book ably and engagingly relates firstly the breathtaking story of the audacious escalade at Ahmednuggur and then the great battle at Assaye.

As with Sharpe's Tiger Cornwell's research and ability to render extremely complex and confused battles both comprehensible and compelling is faultless. When Wellesley's Army first encounters its vast enemy across the River Kaitna I was reminded of the opening scenes of Saving Private Ryan. Carefully and with meticulous attention to detail Cornwell describes the movements of each side which lead ultimately to a veritable David versus Goliath style victory. Military tactics such as how and when Artillery, Infantry and Cavalry are most effectively deployed and when they are virtually useless are explained clearly without any let up in drama or excitement. If you have any interest in how battles were fought in the early nineteenth century you could do a lot worse than read this.

Perhaps inevitably, I have few criticisms; firstly Hakeswill is no less ridiculous than he was in Sharpe's Tiger, secondly I struggled a bit with Wellesley's determination to ford the river at a point where no one believed it could be done. Apparently this is really what happened and we have, of course to allow Cornwell some dramtic licence, but it is simply impossible to believe that he simply ploughed in under intense fire without testing it first! Finally I was confused by Sharpe's love interest, the young French woman Simone. I could not work out why Cornwell bothered with her, so insignificant to the plot is she and the love/sex scene was hurried over so quickly that again I had to wonder why Cornwell had included it at all. The whole thing smacks a bit of being `crow-barred' in simply to give the story a frisson of romance.

Nevertheless I greatly enjoyed the book and as with its predecessor, I learned a great deal. I look forward to following Sharpe and Wellesley to Gawilghur, Trafalgar and on to the European Peninsular.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
on 31 December 2012
I thoroughly enjoyed this book. The Sharpe series looks like a more "grown-up" Flashman. The books appear to be just as accurately researched and the writing is very good.
This story starts with a massacre which Sharpe miraculously survives, goes on to the siege of the city of Ahmednuggur where Wellesley first demonstrates his military audacity, and ends in the hard-fought (and well-described) battle of Assaye. Throughout this overall arc there is an understory involving a hated pursuit of Sharpe by Sergeant Hawkswill (who first appeared in "Sharpe's Tiger") and Sharpe's own pursuit (aided by Colonel McCandless, whom Sharpe had befriended in the earlier novel) of the instigator of the massacre that opened up the tale.
This is an exciting and engrossing read. The characters are perhaps a little cliche but keep the story flowing and the entertainment on the go. The battles are really very well described incorporating that "fog of war" one so often hears about. I finished this book wondering how men could endure such violent brutality - but evidently they did. Highly recommended!
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
on 14 December 2012
If only all history novels were this good!

There is nothing complex here. No detailed characterisation, philosophising or anything that will tax the thoughts of most readers. We have heroes and villains who we cheer or boo like a children's pantomime. This isn't Wolf Hall or War and Peace, but it IS spectacularly enjoyable.

Cornwell's structure, pace and prose are just right. There are moments so thrilling that you will not be able to put this book down. Cornwell's attention to detail is staggering, and his attitude to history is exemplary in the field of historical fiction.

Everything Cornwell invents (and all novellists - even Tolstoy - must partly invent) is detailed in an appendix so that the novel is at all times faithful to historical fact.

Finishing these books, one is left having both 'enjoyed' and 'learned'. And that is why I consider them paragons of their genre.

Dan Crawford
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
on 16 July 2007
I must say I started reading the Sharpe books about last summer (2006) and I've read all 23 and to be honest the first three that I read were the prequels and despite the fact that I read them over the longest time ago I remember them the most. There the ones that got me hooked.
There the best books. mainly thanks to the huge amounts of the disgustingly evil and yet attractive in the same way that prodding a bruise is strangely attractive after you've found you have one. But also I prefer them to the other also brilliant Sharpe books because Sharpe is alone. No high ranking friends because he isn't an officer he's happy how he is but its all turned up side down after Assaye.
The shier vivid ness of the battles is what makes them great all of them are so vivid and the story isn't simply one sided it tells you about the Indians point of view as well.

IT IS TRUELLY ONE OF THE BEST SHARPE BOOKS EVER AND THIS IS FROM A TRUE SHARPE FAN BRILIANT WORK FORM CORNWALL
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
Like otehr readers, I was a little wary of delving back into the 'Sharpe' prequels; I woudl say that they are every bit as good as the original series.

Whilst it may be true that some of the characters are a little wooden, they all contribute to Sharpe's development as a soldier and a potential officer.

The battle scenes are brutal and detailed as ever, most particularly the battle of Assaye - which sees Sharpe defending Wellesley (Wellington) - a relationship that lasts until teh Battle of Waterloo. We also see a continuation of Hakeswill's malicious intent against Sharpe.

In all, we see Sharpe's frustrations and motivations, becoming teh officer that we know and love. I look forward to the next installment and intend on re-reading the entire series again. I am sure that these prequels will enhance the enjoyment - the commuppance of Hakeswill, Sharpe's acceptance as an officer etc.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Send us feedback

How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you?
Let us know here.