Customer Reviews


9 Reviews
5 star:
 (2)
4 star:
 (5)
3 star:
 (2)
2 star:    (0)
1 star:    (0)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


13 of 14 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A review for Jonny's Film Score.
Radiohead has always been a band built of its own reincarnations. Rumors have always persisted about Jonny and Thom's creative control, and compromise, ultimately producing great record after great record. As a fan of Radiohead, I was particularly interested in Jonny's venture - hoping to further decipher Radiohead into its parts, searching for clues as to which...
Published on 5 Nov 2003

versus
5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars An album that builds and destroys itself.
Broadly speaking, and I suppose that this will apply to most readers’ concerns, this album has the essence Radiohead’s post OK Computer fare, insofar as it moves between styles (usually with a decidedly ‘indie’ sensibility) and textures evoking to the listener an uncertain mood, atmosphere and place.
Most importantly, and again, this is...
Published on 4 Feb 2004 by steven


Most Helpful First | Newest First

13 of 14 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A review for Jonny's Film Score., 5 Nov 2003
By A Customer
This review is from: Bodysong (Greenwood) (Audio CD)
Radiohead has always been a band built of its own reincarnations. Rumors have always persisted about Jonny and Thom's creative control, and compromise, ultimately producing great record after great record. As a fan of Radiohead, I was particularly interested in Jonny's venture - hoping to further decipher Radiohead into its parts, searching for clues as to which decisions were his and which weren't.
Fans expecting to do the same will be disappointed in a sense, in that this record is not at all a pop record. Rather, its an amolgum of jazz, synthes, and tribal music. There are no lyrics, this album is fused together (the one thing consistent with the Radiohead records) in such a way that one is never really certain where the track breaks are. Which is fine. Judging from what I know of the film, a mapping of the human condition, there are similarly never any concrete breaks in the lifecycle, so the approach is consistent with the story line.
Ultimately, I think this is a record that will want to make people see the film, will satisfy Radiohead fans, and will get better with more and more listenings.
Sound familiar?
And because I just cannot resist the temptation- this album is one part Lurgee, one part National Anthem, and many parts the Kid A era B-sides.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars multi-sounded music from multi-talented musician, 8 Feb 2005
By 
Mr. R. K. Jones "www.nothingatall.net" (Rhyl, Denbighshire United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Bodysong (Greenwood) (Audio CD)
i dont think i have to say who this is...should be obvious, but i dont want to draw comparisons...so for now forget that band. so bodysong is jonny's first solo outing. and what to expect? well...for a start this isnt easy listening background coffee shop glamour music.
on first listen i didnt know what to expect. a hybrid of guitars/computers/violins/trumpets/tapes maybe? well, i think that almost hit the spot...the songs are based around classical pieces, ambient sounds and chaotic free jazz improv. so there is quite a broad range of sounds here. the first piece [moon trills] is really simple but beautiful piano led piece, with violins sneaking around quietly. but then cut to track six [convergance] and your are treated to a percussion frenzy...a simple beat gradually gets covered in loads of instruments all beating out what seems like a random and chaotic drone.but you realise that there is order to the piece...and as things progress and the track gets louder but more ordered. its very very simple..but its stunning and incredibly well arranged. its things like this that really catch your ear and force you to listen.
there are so many little things about this album that are fantasticly well written and thought out..but somehow its not the sort of thing that is comfortable to listen to.the nearest thing i can think of to this is the montréal collective set fire to flames. but even then it is nothing like that. its far noiser...the whole album is noisy. from the crazed jazz sections to the dark organ pieces. but then there is a little pop sensibility too... there really is a huge range of ideas and sounds and feelings here. just well hidden.
a special mention must be given to the artwork. im not a fan of the jewel case. its horrible..and so i dont like the packaging..but.the artwork is really really good. stanly donwood has again done some brilliant scribbles and blobs. it really works well with the idea [uhm.body..] of the album. but please..next time use something instead of the jewel case! [i know im just rambling, but i just wanted to say how i felt].
so in all fairness this is a beautifully loved and played piece of work by an absolute sonic genius. but it is hard going and it does take time to get into...im still not sure what i think and half of this may just be what i feel now..tomorrow it could be different...
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Groundbreaking, 10 Feb 2007
By 
Ian Barwick (Alton, Hampshire) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Bodysong (Greenwood) (Audio CD)
Wow, I feel a little out of my depth adding to the great reviews already listed.

The other reviews have covered the album in great detail, all I can add is my agreement that this is a fantastic experimental album from one of the best musicians of our generation.

Greenwood has produced a masterpece of an album that challenges you to listen and succeeds in evoking various strong emotions throughout.

What a rare treat it is to listen to real groundbreaking music in this world of sterile pop.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars An album that builds and destroys itself., 4 Feb 2004
By 
steven (Macclesfield, Cheshire United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Bodysong (Greenwood) (Audio CD)
Broadly speaking, and I suppose that this will apply to most readers’ concerns, this album has the essence Radiohead’s post OK Computer fare, insofar as it moves between styles (usually with a decidedly ‘indie’ sensibility) and textures evoking to the listener an uncertain mood, atmosphere and place.
Most importantly, and again, this is broadly speaking; it is successful in what it sets out to do and how it goes about it. The bludgeoning sequencing places squawking Jazz (Splitter) after the profoundly smoother Peartree, that cannot ever feel smooth as what has preceded it has been anything but. Therefore the record intends to evoke an uncertain atmosphere; that is such that as the record proceeds, anything that does feel decidedly placid (such as the synth washes in ‘Milky Drops’) carries with it a sense of being done away with at the drop of a hat.
For people who like songs in the strictest sense, it is doubtful that it will be worth the while. However, people who enjoyed songs such as ‘Pyramid Song’ and ‘treefingers’, and were perhaps hoping the album would be some kind of halfway house between Aphex Twin’s Ambient Works and those aforementioned songs, will be satisfied, at least in part. ‘Moon Trills’ could well be an appendix to ‘Pyramid’, and, instead of merely washing over the piano chords with analog synths, there is a keener sense of melody than in the earlier song. However, both share a fantastical otherworldly quality.
Although the opener does rather stand alone in the sense that it is the only ‘immediate’ or ‘obviously like Radiohead’ song here, it is not the only song that would perhaps interest people who like this style, as it is repeated, albeit in a more atmospheric-centred fashion latterly in ‘Clockwork’, ‘Peartree’ and ‘Bode Radio’. It would probably be more accurate to surmise that the album is essentially a breaking down of the continuity, almost stability of ‘Piano Trills’ into its composite parts. In this respect, it works well. In the respect that it offers to the listener a rewarding listen, it does also. In the respect that it offers ‘songs’, it doesn’t. But it is definitely an album worth listening to, in particular if you enjoy albums as being artistic endeavours in which you lose the sense of it being ‘by’ someone; as within this work there is no sense of a particular genre. Rather an appreciation of differing genres, interpreted, then spat out onto celluloid, creating a work that delineates the artists own methods of invention alongside those he appreciated.
Very good.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Certainly worth buying/borrowing, 2 July 2004
This review is from: Bodysong (Greenwood) (Audio CD)
I must say that I have not regretted buying this album from amazon at all. It is like a special feature in a museum - the sort of thing that you'd be really interested in for a while before moving on and not coming back to it for a few months or so.

Obviously, this is an experimental album. There is only one track with obvious guitars in and that happens to be a good one, '24 Hour Charleston'. Catchy guitaring and a fuzzy beat over the top - experimental electronica.

Arguably the best track of the lot is 'Splitter'. It is jazz but twisted (like John Coltrane's 'Interstella Space' or some of Miles Davis's 70s stuff). It sounds like something that would go on the 'jazz club' on the 'Fast Show' on TV if anyone remembers that. The baseline is pretty catchy, the drumming is loud and insane, and the trumpeting is loosely structured (freestyle is the word I think I'm looking for) and slightly disturbing, almost like the stuff on Radiohead's 'National Anthem'.

'Milky Drops From Heaven' is the other contribution to modern jazz. This one sounds a bit more like what most people imagine jazz to be like until all the dodgy sound effects come in. It works very well - relaxing and terrifiying you at the same time.

There are also many other good types of experiments on the album which you ought to hear, particularly 'Clockwork Tin Soliders' and 'Moon Thrills', often using synths, samples, and other instruments to create strange atmospheres. There is a massive variety of work here, a lot of which I have not mentioned.

Perhaps one slight criticism is the overuse of violas in Bodysong. On the whole, the album is varied and fits together well, but there are four tracks where violas play a major part. In some, such as the last track 'Tehellet' they do a good job at creating quite a spooky ambience, but they are such a dull miserable sounding instrument at the best of times and it just gets a bit much.

Still, definetely worth buying for the other things that it has to offer. It needs patience though. Don't expect to like it the first time round because this is not a pop album, rather a collection of excellent experimental pieces.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Not Radiohead, 29 May 2006
By 
K. P. Mccullagh "Hairyfoot" (Aylesbury,UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Bodysong (Greenwood) (Audio CD)
Do not buy this album expecting another volume from the Radiohead cannon; this is a film soundtrack album that has more to do with progressive jazz, minimilist and classical music.

The first piece "Moon Trills" is excellent as is "24 hour Charlseton"; however some of the tracks such as "convergence" can lead to a bit of mental anguish.

Never the less it is an intersting album and definately worth a litsen. Think more Miles Davis and Philip Glass than Paranoid Android
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Staggering Solo Debut From Jonny Greenwood, 18 Jun 2011
This review is from: Bodysong (Greenwood) (Audio CD)
Jonny Greenwood has always embodied an almost childlike wonder at the seemingly limitless possibilities of music and sonic manipulation. His sheer joy at being let loose in a room full of instruments and studio gadgetry is therefore clearly evident across his debut album "Bodysong", a soundtrack for Simon Pummell's 2003 film. This is a wonderfully schizophrenic collection spanning Free Jazz, white noise, Electronica and orchestration, sometimes all combined within the same track. It is a startling testament to Greenwood's ability as a composer that none of these pieces ever descend into pastiche.

The opening "Moon Trills", with its mournful piano, gradually swelling strings and haunting Ondes Martenot is a particular standout, as is the beautiful closer "Tehellet" which somehow manages to intertwine a spiralling surge of orchestration with heavily-vocodered voice and still sound completely right. The crashingly percussive assault of "Convergence" will be familiar to viewers of Paul Thomas Anderson's "There Will Be Blood", which Greenwood later scored to similarly dazzling effect.

"Bodysong" works brilliantly as a standalone album (I bought it on its day of release and, perhaps bizarrely, have yet to see the film even all these years later). Even long-time Radiohead fans may find initial listenings somewhat impenetrable, but, like every great album, "Bodysong" slowly gives up its secrets whilst continuing to sound fresh even after countless listens. It's well worth exploring, and simply too good to dismiss as a mere "side project".
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5 of 15 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Melodies that remind me of the holocaust, 27 Oct 2003
By 
A. Macdermott (United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Bodysong (Greenwood) (Audio CD)
The first seconds roll out simple piano chords, with sighing synthesisers and tickling keys in the background. This is the most uniform point of the record. Computers are present but not dominate and Thom’s antiestablishment lyrical propaganda is nowhere to be seen. This is not a Radiohead record; this is the soundtrack to Bodysong.
The compact disc includes short extracts from the film and these help enormously in the understanding of the music. If you have found Kid A a complex struggle be prepared to cry with confusion, although once understood I feel this record has orgasmic effects to offer.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 6 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Very difficult, but in a good way., 11 Jun 2004
This review is from: Bodysong (Greenwood) (Audio CD)
This is quite fitting, i mean, it just doesnt have the spark to get five or four starts but still, it seems right to give it three, and i still consider it a good album, and wise in buying it. It's adventurous, but not an album youll repeatedly listen to, every few months, youll listen to it again, and appreciate the stuff that Radioheads lead guitarist has in his head.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

Bodysong Original Soundtrack
Bodysong Original Soundtrack by Jonny Greenwood
Buy MP3 Album7.49
Add to wishlist See buying options
Only search this product's reviews