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34 of 35 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Modern Classic!
The Snapper is perhaps the best Irish Comedy to have ever hailed from the shores of this tiny Island. Not only are the characters fully developed, interesting, intruiging, loving and human - they are unforgettably watchable. This is a movie that you can watch over and over and over and still never tire of it! What differs the most about this Irish movie compared to others...
Published on 14 Dec 2003 by Eva Stewart

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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Typical Irish Comedy at its best!
The middle part of the BarryTown trilogy is probably the weakest in terms of plot and laugh-out-loud one liners but still a gem in its own right. It must be seen with The Commitments and The Van to receive the full treatment and humour. The themes are obviously similar, the accents take a little adjusting to but the humour is always present. The three films are thoroughly...
Published on 19 Dec 2009 by James C. Corrigan


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34 of 35 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Modern Classic!, 14 Dec 2003
The Snapper is perhaps the best Irish Comedy to have ever hailed from the shores of this tiny Island. Not only are the characters fully developed, interesting, intruiging, loving and human - they are unforgettably watchable. This is a movie that you can watch over and over and over and still never tire of it! What differs the most about this Irish movie compared to others is that the main focus of the film is not the 'Irishness' or 'Oirishness' of the characters, in fact (thankfully) we are not subjected to the usual bias cultural discourse we usuall have to endure when viewing Irish movies (usually made by foreigners... about 'being Irish'), no, instead (thank God!) this film is based on a Universal theme - an unplanned pregnancy! The Script is at times hilarious, but always realistic and sympathetic. Colm Meany's relationship with his daughter (played by Tina Kelleher) is tangibly real and magnetic. The Kids are great too, in particular Joanne Gerrard as the disgruntled Teenage daugheter with wojus fashion sense, but of all the Kids it's Colm O'Byrne who really shines as the hilarious youngest 'ungrateful' Brother. This is a must see!!
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34 of 36 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars "We all do stupid things when we're drunk, don't we?", 12 Feb 2005
By 
Mary Whipple (New England) - See all my reviews
(HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)    (TOP 100 REVIEWER)   
Soon after a wild night at the pub, twenty-year-old Sharon Curley (Tina Kellegher) finds herself expecting a little "snapper" by a man she loathes. Her refusal to name the father sets in motion a family drama involving her three brothers, two sisters, and her parents, along with her employers and all her friends. Kellegher, playing the role as a coarse, earthy, yet remarkably sensible young woman (with the exception of her excessive drinking during her pregnancy) soon discovers who her friends really are, as some people tease and torment her, some make remarks to her siblings, some force her father to take direct action in her defense, and all spread gossip.
Des Curley (Colm Meaney), Sharon's father, shows the whole world in his face, his emotions ranging from outrage toward Sharon for embarrassing the family to tender concern as her time draws near. As the eight-member family trips all over each other emotionally (ironically symbolized in their battles for the one bathroom, often occupied by Sharon), the tensions within the family grow more intense. Widespread speculation about who the father is disrupts the neighborhood, with some hotheads visiting their own brand of justice on the Curleys. The arrival of the baby offers a chance at resolution.
Often very funny and equally often very touching, the film features actors who do not act like actors, appearing to be grounded in the very neighborhood they inhabit in the film. With the pub as social center, we see the characters' lifestyles and mores--their attitudes toward sex and childbirth, their "escapes" from the workday, their daily amusements and sense of humor, and their lack of concern with the dogma of the church.
The second in Roddy Doyle's The Barrytown Trilogy, after The Commitments, this film like The Van, which follows, features author Roddy Doyle writing his own screenplay, Stephen Frears as director, Oliver Stapleton as cinematographer, and actor Colm Meaney (playing the father Des, here) as the emotional bridge among the characters, appearing in all three films and giving a sense of continuity among them. Set in north Dublin in a lower working class neighborhood where many families spend their whole lives, the film shows the reliance on humor when life might otherwise be too tragic to handle. Mary Whipple
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Side Splitting Real Life Comedy at its Best, 12 April 2000
By A Customer
Colm Meaney is breathtaking in this movie which brings tears of laughter while being faithful to the real stuff of life. Its a wonderful tale of family values ...the Irish Waltons dealing with the trials and tribulations of everyday disfunctionality with humour and love.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Best of the trilogy, 17 Oct 2010
By 
The Raven ""Max"" (Brno, Czech Republic) - See all my reviews
This review is from: The Snapper [DVD] [1993] (DVD)
Talk to anyone about the Barrytown Trilogy, anyone remotely in the know will always talk about "The Commitments" first.

However, for me, the snapper is the definitive highlight. colm meaney's performance alone makes this film an absolute joy to watch as his rampaging Da character has fights in bars, screams and swears about Georgy Burgess and his childish sulks with Sharon and Kay had me in stitches.

Tina kellegher is also magnificent as the shamed and ridiculed sharon. Her relationship with the two main men in the film; the Da and George Burgess is absolutely hilarious.

All in all, just fantastic viewing and I strongly recommend to anyone who likes a good deep belly laugh.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A 1990s Irish classic, 17 Nov 2013
By 
This review is from: The Snapper [DVD] [1993] (DVD)
A gritty, realistic and hilarious look at Dublin working class life in the 1990s based on the novel by Roddie Doyle. When twenty-year old Sharon Curley (Tina Kellegher) informs her father, Desi , and mother, Kay (Ruth McCabe) that she's "up the pole", they aren't thrilled, but there's no display of histrionics. After asking who the father is (and not being told), Desi invites his daughter out to the local pub for a drink. Sharon's friends are as interested as her family in the father's identity, but she resolutely keeps mum about the truth until an event in the neighborhood brings it into the open. It turns out that the father was her friend Yvonne's father George Burgess (Pat Laffan) , who took advantage of her while she was drunk. Sharon tells everyone that it was a Spanish sailor, to avoid the embarrassment and the shame of everybody knowing. However most of the town believe the truth. She is often criticized and made fun of because of Burgess being the father. Because of the incident, Burgess runs away from home, and Sharon quits her job as a shelf stacker.

What makes this movie a classic is the robust humour, the working class conflict and loyalties, the family dynamics and prejudiced and sexual narrow mindedness, some of them being unbelievably nasty
but it is how the Curley family comes together that conquers all as well as the general strength of character of Sharon and the loyalty of her best friend Jackie (Fionnuala Murphy).
One of my best things about the movie is its theme song being I Cant Stop Falling In Love With You by Lick The Tins, my favourite version of the song-I love that song!
It captures early 1990s Irish working class culture in the same way that Angela's Ashes captures 1930s and 40s Irish working class culture.
But with some really uproarious infectious humour, with gusto and without a dull moment.

A 1990s Irish classic
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Too Little-Known Slice of Dublin Life (Charming), 10 May 2010
By 
Stephanie De Pue (Wilmington, NC USA) - See all my reviews
(TOP 1000 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: The Snapper [DVD] [1993] (DVD)
"The Snapper," (1993), a comedy directed by Stephen Frear (My Beautiful Laundrette [DVD] [1985]), began life as a television movie, but was quickly judged to be worth being better-known: and so was given theatrical release. It was nominated for a Golden Globe, and still deserves to be better-known. The script was written by Irish author Roddy Doyle, based on his own book of the same name. It's the second of his The Barrytown Trilogy: "The Commitments", "The Snapper" and "The Van", coming after the well-known, successful The Commitments (Special Edition) [DVD] [1991], and before the equally-funny The Van [DVD] [1996] It's set in a working-class Dublin neighborhood, and concerns the Curleys, a large, boisterous family. Now, I'd have to admit I've no first-hand experience of Irish working class families, or neighborhoods, and nobody we meet in this picture is any candidate for sainthood -- neighbors and family are nosy, and can be cruel-- but the picture's funny as all get-out. It's got wit to burn, and hearing the way the Irish use the English language adds greatly to its brilliant charm.

It was filmed on location in Dublin, and the locations are fairly accurately used; furthermore, it appears to provide a fairly accurate portrait of the early 90's city. The film stars Colm Meaney (best known as Chief Miles O'Brien on "Star Trek") as Dessie Curley, father of the family. It's almost inevitable: you've got to say this is the role he was born to play, giving him a chance to use acting chops that "Star Trek" sure doesn't. Meaney must have known practically from birth that his "everyman" face didn't give him a shot at romantic leads: but comic leads, ahh now. Ruth McCabe, My Left Foot [DVD] [1989] nimbly plays his wife; and Tina Kellegher, Sharon, the eldest daughter, who sets off the action by announcing that she's pregnant, and stubbornly refusing to divulge the baby's father. Brendan Gleeson (In Bruges [DVD] [2008]) provides sturdy support.

Warning to the politically correct: you may wince at scenes of the pregnant Sharon drinking and smoking heavily, but that's the kind of girl she is, in no danger of turning vegetarian. Loosen your stays, forget your strictures, and enjoy her wit.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Fantastic, funny and heart touching, 3 Nov 2009
This review is from: The Snapper [DVD] [1993] (DVD)
Such a lovely, moving and funny movie with fantastic performances. You'll laugh and you'll cry.
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12 of 14 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The Snapper, 5 July 2004
The Snapper is a down to earth comedy with occaisional trips into the heavens. The humour is brilliant and the subject covered gives plenty of opportunity to raise a few laughs about the real world.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Typical Irish Comedy at its best!, 19 Dec 2009
By 
This review is from: The Snapper [DVD] [1993] (DVD)
The middle part of the BarryTown trilogy is probably the weakest in terms of plot and laugh-out-loud one liners but still a gem in its own right. It must be seen with The Commitments and The Van to receive the full treatment and humour. The themes are obviously similar, the accents take a little adjusting to but the humour is always present. The three films are thoroughly recommended and are worth re-watching time and again.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A great Roddy Doyle Farce, 15 Aug 2013
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This review is from: The Snapper [DVD] [1993] (DVD)
Got this to compliment my collection. Very funny and outrageous at times. A good buy, but my favorite is the Commitments.
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The Snapper [DVD] [1993]
The Snapper [DVD] [1993] by Stephen Frears (DVD - 2009)
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