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31
3.8 out of 5 stars
Technical Ecstasy
Format: Audio CDChange
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
The seventh studio album from the classic Black Sabbath line up of Osbourne, Iommi, Ward and Butler is a bit of a departure from their signature sound and the last gasp from a band in decline.

With a somewhat less heavy sound than on previous albums, this is a more middle of the road rock and roll album, until you listen closely to the lyrics (which deal with drugs, streetwalkers, transvestites and other insalubrious topics). Lyrically it is a strong effort with some great song writing in evidence.

However, other aspects of the band were in fast decline. As with Sabotage there is a feeling of overproduction and a loss of spontaneity, and Osbourne seems more and more disinterested in the singing, to the extent that Bill Ward provides vocals for one track.

It's a decent record in most lights, but does not compare favourably with their earlier material. 3 stars.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
on 19 October 2014
I was very wary of buying 'Technical Ecstasy' because I thought it would shatter my perception of Black Sabbath. Indeed, until recently I had never heard it - even 38 years after it was originally released! Well, I took the plunge, and I'm glad that I did, because it didn't seem to me to be quite as different from the previous albums as had often been claimed.

It's interesting how just one or two tracks can change one's perception of a record. The two that stick out here are 'It's Alright' which sounds very different not least because of Bill Ward singing the vocals, and 'She's Gone' which is a nice song but a bit lightweight for me. Really though these are the only tracks that are that different from the previous Sabbath style.

The other six tracks this album, 'Back Street Kids', 'You Won't Change Me', 'Gypsy', 'All Moving Parts', 'Rock 'n' Roll Doctor' and 'Dirty Women' are all full-on with a great heavy guitar sound and actually sound like a natural follow-up to 'Sabotage' which itself was a substantial progression from say, 'Black Sabbath' or 'Paranoid'.

If you like the first six Sabbath albums then definitely don't be afraid to get this. You may like all eight songs on it, after all they are all good. But if you don't, do not let the one or two lighter ones put you off, just play the rest of it. It rocks!
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17 of 23 people found the following review helpful
on 13 August 2010
It's funny isn't it sometimes how an album gets categorised as one thing or another. Appetite for destruction, brilliant -which frankly, isn't. Technical Ecstasy, poor to average -which it also isn't. Different to be sure, but a great album nonetheless. Some memorable riffs on very good and catchy songs and a lively performance from Ozzy -e.g. Rock 'n' Roll Doctor -and rather welcomingly, to my ears at least, from Bill Ward on 'It's Alright.'

This is to Sabbath's musical legacy what Robin Trower's 'Caravan to Midnight' is to his - an overlooked gem. Just as long as you take it out of context and enjoy it for what it is... a departure.

Hell, most of us like to travel don't we? Departures sure work for me. Set sail for a foreign land and enjoy this trip.

Ciao.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
on 24 February 2012
I couldn't resist throwing my opinion in.
As other people have already stated, gone is the dark feel of many previous albums, and yes it definitely has a slicker, very mastered sound.

However, I believe that the slating this album receives is just not justified. There are still some great tracks, and some great riffs. Yes, Sabbath were definitely reaching for a more middle of the road market, but I still really enjoy this album.

Give it a try!!
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14 of 20 people found the following review helpful
on 23 September 2009
I did buy three of the new Black Sabbath remasters which were released in September 2009 and mastered by Andy Pearce. The other two are "Sabbath Bloody Sabbath" and "Sabotage". While the other two sound very nice, this version of "Technical Ecstasy" just sounds awful. The treble and bass are incredibly jacked up, and the CD is way too loud, there is hardly any dynamic range left. Your ears will hurt after just one minute if you listen to this at anything but a very low volume.

I was very disappointed about this CD, and it sounds almost like a defect. I am thinking of returning this one because I find it to be an unacceptable product.
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4 of 6 people found the following review helpful
on 8 July 2010
Unlike the other reviews I would say this album is worth getting if you like Black Sabbath. Ok I'd buy their first four albums before I'd get this one (which i did) but songs like Back Street Kids which is a good straight ahead rocker with lyrics that seem to hark back to the bands youth "Brought up in a back street living with the salt of the land" and It's Alright sung by Bill Ward which shows a more reflective, tender side to the band are quality songs. Overall while not an essential Ozzy-era album to buy it's still worth getting,
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3 of 5 people found the following review helpful
on 29 May 2012
I discovered Black Sabbath in the mid-late 70's with Sabotage and especially Technical Ecstasy.
I think it was the best way to discover these albums without being influenced with hopes based on previous albums (which are also great).
From Technical Ecstasy, the standout track are for me Dirty Women with one of the best ever riffs at the mid-song and the fast Back street kids. There are no weak songs in this album and is very versatile in style and prove that Sabbath are great song writers and great musicians.
For sure, this album is very different to anything they have done before, but it doesn't mean it is bad.
It is a fantastic rock album with great songs, great tunes, powerful riffs and fantastic guitar solos.
It is also the one album of the ozzy era which has the best recording sound.
Black Sabbath could certainly not keep on doing the same music as the first few albums and an evolution needed to be done.
Technical ecstasy is so different that some people felt very disapointed (as some were with Sabotage), but what if it was going to be similar to Vol4 or Paranoid, people would have said that Sabbath had no more inspiration.
Anyway, everybody is free to think what they want on this and I do not critisize people who think differently.
But if the criticism is only because it sounds different and ignoring the quality of the songs, this is a shame.

I would recomend this album to any rock/heavy rock fans and it would certainly appeal also to non-sabbath fans and a good way to discover the band for young generation.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on 14 November 2011
I have been playing this album regularly on vinyl for over 30 years. It is the finest Sabbath album that has been made. Gone are the dark and heavy riffs and basic production of the first four offerings which, while it is what Sabbath are best known for were starting to sound tired.

This album builds on the two previous albums, Sabbath Bloody Sabbath and Sabotage and delivers some of the finest guitar work of the seventies.

Highlights include Gypsy and Dirty Women which have stunning guitar solos and All Moving Parts (Stand Still) with it's clever blend of Ozzy's vocals and lyrics that make me smile every time I hear them.

The songs may not all be as readily accessible as some of the earlier work but they are clever and well thought out.

The production values on this release are good although no improvement on the original.

Also, at this price you would be mad not to!
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
This album has always had a bad press, yet it is one of Black Sabbaths best. Although not as good as Paranoid or Master of Reality, it holds its own against Vol.4 and Sabbath Bloody Sabbath. You won't change me, Gypsy, All Moving Parts and Rock n' Roll Doctor are brilliant songs, It's alright is a depature from the Sabbath sound, but is one of the most beautiful and uplifting songs they ever recorded, and Dirty Women is one of Sabbaths top five songs for sure. I recommend this album to anyone getting into Black Sabbath because it showcases a different side to there talents.
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3 of 5 people found the following review helpful
on 28 August 2010
"Technical Ecstasy" differed even in the 1976 vinyl release in its production style from the previous albums. Then, too, the album had a compressed sound. So I would not judge the remastering as bad. All the Ozzy-years-albums are good albums. Certainly the last three albums with Ozzy are not the heavy metal monoliths like the first five. But 1976 was not 1970. The times had changed, the music had changed and the band had changed. But until the departure of Ozzy Osbourne everything Black Sabbath had published had its class, despite the stylistic changes.
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