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31
3.8 out of 5 stars
Technical Ecstasy
Format: Audio CDChange
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on 11 August 2013
Right I am going to get straight to the point.
Just ignore all the total twaddle talked/written about this album. I have loved it for over 30 years..It has greatness and more to the point some fantastic tracks.Just listen to it and make your own mind up. Do not follow the crowd.And remember..Sabbath had to do something different: you can't just churn out the same stuff year on year..
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4 of 7 people found the following review helpful
on 1 April 2012
Don't be fooled by the mindless and ignorant putdowns of this album because they are all so wrong! Technical Ecstasy is Black Sabbath's finest work in so many ways, not least of all as everyone has their chance to shine. Sure the slick basslines and lyrics of Geezer Butler and the omnipresent guitar glory of Tony Iommi are there as are Ozzy's powerful and melodic voice, but even Bill Ward gets his moment to sing on It's Alright which is an unexpected surprise.

Blasting off with the heavy metal riffage of Back Street Kids they are bang on the money with one of their heaviest songs ever. Next up You Won't Change Me conjures up some Who-esque keyboard wizardry from Gerald Woodruffe and is a beautiful heartfelt performance, one of Sab's most soulful songs ever. Its Alright is just a lovely piano driven piece sung by Bill Ward interlaced with some fine acoustic guitar from Iommi. Gypsy ends side one with some catchy yet still damn heavy riffage again from the man missing finger parts and is a quintessential Sabbath rocker. Its also the band's first attempt at self production and they pull it off handsomely with a beefy sound.

And thats just side one! Why people complain and slate this record is beyond reason. I mean what's there not to like so far?. All their trademarks are there and more as they are expanding and refining their sound.

All Moving Parts( Stand Still) continues this flawless songwriting tradition with some nice tempo shifts keeping things interesting. Rock And Roll Doctor is just Sabs having fun with another great riff and hilarious chorus while She's Gone injects some dark reflective moments and violins for the ballad piece which goes into Dirty Women probably their best song ever. This song alone has so many riffs in it and is where Priest got their Breaking The Law one from! A seedy tale of backstreet whores and vice and a great way to end a totally flawless album.

I have played this record to people who were of the opinion it was crap and they were pleasantly surprised just how good it actually is. In fact its been lent out so many times its scratched and case damaged yet plays flawlessly! It still perplexes me how ignorant people are when reviewing music, they don't give it a chance and want every album to sound like Paranoid or SBS, but its every bit as good as those, only its different in that what it lacks in experimentation it makes up for by consolidation and production, a sorta one size fits all Sabs if you like.
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4 of 7 people found the following review helpful
on 27 June 2010
Other reviewers are quite right when it comes to this album, Technical ecstacy is in it's own right one of if not the worst Black sabbath album alongside the well-known 1995 misfire "Forbidden" but it did actually contain a few gems like "Dirty women" which in my book was enough to bolster the album to be worthy of at least two stars. Here, is a classic and unfortunate case where we have a poor album-remastered poorly. The other reviewer here is indeed correct about the irritating bass, but the production also fails to reach the lofty standards demonstrated by the other 70's Sabbath remasters which were all excellent in my opinion, On the same hand clarity seems to have been forgotten about under the mirky mess.

As it is, i have gradually collected all of the new 2009 digipak releases and the earliest Quadaphonic mixes of the first three albums. This was the only one I felt necessary to sell, and that was exactly what I did, In any case I strongly advise a good thorough and detailed look into this product if you still feel compelled to buy it, ultimately there is just no getting away from the fact that this is a definative missed opportunity here on show, The album was released right the way back in '76 but the fact that it's not a great album anyway isn't really the problem. As a 2009 remaster fans I think had deserved a much better effort. So, being easily the worst remaster of all the 2009 Sabbath releases, customers and fans on here need to be warned about poor products, this is one of them.
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2 of 4 people found the following review helpful
on 15 May 2011
It was 1976, I used to visit my one local record shop in the lunch hour at school with my mates. Two record sleeves always attracted me, Stormbringer - Deep Purple and Technical Ecstasy - Black Sabbath, I would just stand and stare at them, open up the gatefold and look inside, and strangely enough both are bloody good records albiet a departure from the bands normal output.

While Deep Purple were turning into a funk band ("shoe shine music" as Blackmore was to speak of it rather dismissively), Black Sabbath were turning into Deep Purple. Iommi's riffs are a little more on the top E string rather than the bottom, but they are riffs non the less, and this album rocks just like any other Sabbath record, although not quite as darkly, but then they were trying to distance themselves from the pigeon hole of lords of darkness after all.

"Back Street Kids" is a very autobiographical track and is a brilliant opener, and the album just keeps on going from there.

For me, Sabbath never did a bad album in the Ozz years, they range from the sublime (Paranoid, Master of Reality), the excellent (Black Sabbath, Sabotage, Technical Ecstasy, Sabbath Bloody Sabbath) and the very good (Volume 4, Never Say Die).

This is essential listenning for any serious Black Sabbath collector, what are you waiting for, buy the thing!!
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on 23 December 2013
bought to replenish my tired old worn out vinyl from the seventies as one to many parties have taken their toll on my old reccies nice to hear these again on cd and as always its well worth the price
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 20 December 2010
This is the album that everyone seems to agree marked a downturn in the Sabbath greatness. Technically (no pun intended) they are right. It has many failings and barely a whisper of the band of old remained. However they do deserve marks for trying to expand their sound, despite the fact that it didn't work particularly well. And without Technical Ecstacy there would have been no Never Say Die, which I see as the creative success that Technical... wasn't.

The overall feel of the album is very of it's time. It is akin to early Magnum material and can be seen as progressive in places, but at its heart beats a pure vein of hard rock and roll. 'Back Street Kids' is evidence of this rock and roll centre. It's a great opener with a catchy chorus and some driving guitars. 'You Won't Change Me' slows it down slightly and is reminiscent of the old doomster tracks they invented. But it is more subtle and definitely more slight than it should have been. The light and dark are not punctuated with any brilliance and the song ambles on. 'It's Alright' is another change of pace. Sung by the drummer, Bill Ward, it is a welcome breath of air. Musically it is very 70s California, insomuch as it does not feel like a Black Sabbath track. There are no foreboding riffs just non-threatening acoustic strumming. It is one of my favourite tracks. 'Gypsy' is another progressive number that doesn't work but is not a bad song. After a few listens, the twists and turns and story takes shape. It's a worthy track, just not a great one.

'All Moving Parts' is much the same as the side one closer. It has time changes, difficult widdly bits and quite a rocking beat that drives it, but it lacks a rhythm and a tune. 'Rock & Roll Doctor' is very average and not the sort of track you would expect a band of their calibre to commit to. I suppose it's a fun, light relief song but it is not much of one. It is an upbeat rock and roll track that should have been sold to ZZ Top. 'She's Gone', however, is stunningly good. It is a ballad good and proper. There are no distorted guitars, just ethereal picking, angelic orchestral accompaniment and a mood of severe melancholy. It really is a triumph. Pity then that 'Dirty Women' ends the album by taking the progressive and rock and roll idea and putting them together. What occurred was a 7 minute track about prostitutes that meandered to a very boring chorus.

Not all bad, not all good. It is the very definitive middling album; there are about 3 great tracks, 3 ok tracks and 2 below average ones. Not a great place to start with Sabbath but by no means an album to miss as the few gems there are sparkle very brightly indeed.
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on 21 December 2014
A lot of nonsense. Die hard fans only.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on 25 March 2015
Surprised at the number of negative reviews of this album. Still one of my fav Sabbath albums with some excellent guitar work from Tony Iommi.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on 31 January 2014
Always a joy to listen to, I especially like the contrast between Rock 'N' Roll Doctor followed on by She's Gone which exudes
emotion
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on 18 January 2014
takes me back a fair few years.
not everyones taste, but great if it is.
recommended for metalists.
a good buy.
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