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on 5 December 2003
With echoes of fellow Warp'ers new and old (Richard James in all his incarnations, Richie Hawtin, Reload, LFO - the list goes on), YosepH is a mellow-dramatic excursion into a reminescence of how electronic dance music has evolved, with an incessant emotional attachment to Roland music products: TB303, TR909, TR808, Jupiter, need I say more ? But this does not mean that this album sounds dated - the opposite rather is the case. It does sound very recent yet with a definate "I used to listen to music like this before" feeling, which pays respect to all previous electronic frontiersmen since Robert Moog decided to pick up his soldering iron, one Friday in the late 1950s. I put it down to the composition and general production of each track - very well structured, definately not formulaic (Luke would never be called that in any case...), and each track evolves along familiar sounding but unfamiliar feeling lines. All good stuff. Everyone should continue to support Warp Records in order that they can still innovate via artists such as Mr. Vibert. In terms of the tracks, favorites are the title track, as well as Slowfast (which is excellent when mixed with any vocal track, as by Strictly Kev / DK in a Solid Steel show recently), Harmonic, Iloveacid, the tongue-n-cheek Countdown (tinges of Eggy Bam Yasi, Kosmik Kommando and Tricky Disco in an homage to Kraftwerk - yes mate), Freaktimebaby and the Spieldberg-esque Liptones (thanks to the tonal rendition of Close Encounters and mo-slow percussion, similar to Jarre's Oxygene 4). Synthax is pure late 1990s AFX / Autechre / Jake Slazenger / Reload / Global Communications. And heres an interesting diversion - because Noktup is akin to something Plaid / Black Dog might have done on a rainy Saturday afternoon. While Ambalek is what you might play alongside anything by Pete Namlook / David Sylvian / Japan / Leibach. In summary, an album you need in your collection - I have no reservation in recommending it and have no hesitation in standing by it.
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VINE VOICEon 27 November 2003
It's been a long time coming, but, after ten years, Luke Vibert has finally made it to his spiritual home, Warp, and released an album of good old acid. Not that he hadn't tried to flog a few of his acid tracks here and there before, but they always seem to get in the way of his other love: hip-hop. Although the man has been rather prolific since he released his debut, Phat Lab Nightmare, released under the Wagon Christ banner, back in 1994, dabbling in genres as diverse as ambient, drum'n'bass (who could forget the little gem that was Drum'n'Bass For Papa as Plug), electro or dub, Vibert remains best known for his hip-hop flavoured electronica and his cut'n'paste approach. So this new album offers a refreshing insight into his vast musical landscape.
Determined to make a point, with the first extract from this album shouting loud and clear I Love Acid and insisting on the pH at the end of the title for this ninth album, Luke Vibert sets the record straight. Acid is neither dead nor irrelevant. But, don't be mistaken. This album is not a nostalgic journey into late eighties dance music. Quite the opposite. Vibert might have played around with his 303 for years, but YosepH is resolutely modern. Although bearing all the characteristics of the genre, evoking in turn the best moments of 808 States - that'll be everything before they started rubbing shoulders with celebs - and his mate Aphex's Polygonic excursions, this album is resolutely modern. Starting in surprisingly subdued fashion with the indolent and sumptuous Liptones, YosepH soon asserts its identity with Synthax and Freak Time Baby, arguably the most classic acid moment here. A master as crafting incredibly complex yet accessible tracks, Luke unusually juggles here with linear beats, clean bass lines and straightforward melodies. Yet, the unmistakable Vibert touch is palpable all the way through. The use of familiar vocal samples on Freak Time Baby, Countdown or the ominous Ambalek wouldn't have sounded out of place on Big Soup or Tally Ho, and the meticulous approach to his sonic environment remains intact. Although deceptively simple in appearance, these thirteen tracks develop over intricate textures. The splendid I Love Acid is a perfect example. Kicking off as a Kraftwerk parody, it soon incorporates some nasty 303 assault. Acidisco proves even more fascinating as the beat progressively rolls in and Vibert fools around, while the title track is a virulent revision of 808 State's Cubik.
Listening to YosepH, it suddenly seems absurd that Luke's acid hasn't generated much interest from his past labels until now. That it's taken ten years for Warp to get him on board to finally collate what undoubtedly represent a drop in his vast collection of unreleased material can therefore be welcome with even more joy. Luke's made it home, and he's brought with him his most compelling album to date.
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on 3 November 2003
Stick with this album as it's a real grower. If you like Luke Vibert's other albums (especially as Wagon Christ) then you'll definitely like this one. It's still got the light-hearted Vibert touch, but got so much depth and detail it reaffirms his status as one of the UK's top musicians. It also happens to be full of kick-ass infectious dance classics! Many people will have caught the lush 'I Love Acid' on 12", but also check out title track YosepH, Acidisco, and (my favourite) Slowfast. Mmmmmm
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on 11 November 2003
if you were a fan of earlier warp stuff, but got a bit put off by some of the noodly stuff in the mid to late 90's, this LP is for you! Vibert is a master of his kit, and the grooves and tracks here are programmed expertly. "ILoveAcid", "FreakTimeBaby" and "Acidisco" are killer tunes, so it's well worth the money.
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on 31 October 2003
Stick with this album as it's a real grower. If you like Luke Vibert's other albums (especially as Wagon Christ) then you'll definitely like this one. It's still got the light-hearted Vibert touch, but got so much depth and detail it reaffirms his status as one of the UK's top musicians. It also happens to be full of kick-ass infectious dance classics! Many people will have caught the lush 'I Love Acid' on 12", but also check out title track YosepH, Acidisco, and (my favourite) Slowfast. Mmmmmm
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on 14 May 2013
You can't touch this without that sounding MC hammer lol. It's another great production by the king of 90's underground dance. Be prepared to want to go a bit wild when you check this out, I know I did. Truly original and a testament to a well respected producer.
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