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21 of 21 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars RETURN TO CHILDHOOD
My favourite Marillion album from the Fish era has always been Fugazi but 'Misplaced Childhood' certainly has to be one of the most accomplished rock albums of the 1980s. For long time fans like me, it also takes one back to that great year (I was ten), when Marillion seemed to be in every paper and magazine, and on the radio constantly. We also got to see Fish in tartan...
Published on 18 Oct 2006 by Stotty

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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars One Star
Dreadful quality.
Published 1 month ago by V STRANG


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21 of 21 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars RETURN TO CHILDHOOD, 18 Oct 2006
By 
Stotty (Bolton, England) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Misplaced Childhood (Audio CD)
My favourite Marillion album from the Fish era has always been Fugazi but 'Misplaced Childhood' certainly has to be one of the most accomplished rock albums of the 1980s. For long time fans like me, it also takes one back to that great year (I was ten), when Marillion seemed to be in every paper and magazine, and on the radio constantly. We also got to see Fish in tartan suits and his kilt.
Again, only Marillion would be brave enough to attempt to make a concept album in 1985, but it is a triumph of music over people that it performed so well, and still sounds so good now.
Modern Marillion fans may harp on about the merits of 'Brave', but for me, 'Misplaced Childhood' will always win hands down when it comes to the better concept album.
The concept is alot less straightforward here than on 'Brave' however. It's based on a bad acid trip suffered by Fish, which caused him to have some spooky 'visions' which in turn caused him to envisage a drummer boy. He went on to scribble down his experiences as a child and a young adult with the young boy acting almost as a muse.
'Pseudo Silk Kimono' starts things off with some lush, misty sounding keyboards, and links superbly to the band's mega hit signature theme, 'Kayleigh'.
'Kayleigh' may still be a perennial radio favourite a la Van Halen's 'Jump', but it still remains an almost perfect four minute rock song. Lyrically romantic and powerfully played, 'Kayleigh' is highly unrepresentative of the band's sound, but it opened the eyes and ears of the nation to Marillion and their overall style as countless people went out and bought the album.
'Lavender' is very similar to 'Kayleigh' in terms of the commercial success it helped the band to achieve. It provided them with another top ten single and remains a lovely piece of rock whimsy.
'Bitter Suite' is very much the spine of the first 'side' and shows the band returning very much to the type of atmospheric, moody music which made their debut 'Script For A Jester's Tear' so absorbing. Lyrically enthralling with effective musical pastel shadings, it's an understated piece which reels you in as the listener.
'Heart Of Lothian' closes the first suite of linked music and is still a joy to these ears with it's football stadium chant style and soaring guitars and keyboards. It lifts the gloom of the previous track beautifully and provided the band with a top thirty single.
'Waterhole (expresso bongo)' is a stark piece with plenty of underlying menace as Fish continues to rant about his obvious dislike of 'wide boys', as mentioned in the previous track.
'Lords Of The Backstage' has the potential to be a top tune with an oddball rhythm section and a memorable theme. However, it seems to end just as it's begun which is a shame.
'Blind Curve', like 'Bitter Suite' on the first half of the album is a dark, moody atmospheric piece which shows the lyrical concept of the album gaining in depth, as a drug addled Fish sees the image of the drummer boy on his staircase. It ends as a political rant which leads into the excellent 'Childhood's End?'
'Childhood's End?', like 'Heart Of Lothian' is effective in that it brightens up the subject matter, which on the previous track is very dark indeed. It's a lively track with lots of top guitar and keyboards and a soaring chorus.
'White Feather', like every closing track on Marillion albums up to this point has a highly anthemic, almost military feel. It closes the record perfectly and makes you want to press play once again.
It's difficult to dissect 'Misplaced Childhood' track by track. You have to look at it as a whole, and 'Kayleigh', 'Lavender', 'Heart Of Lothian' and 'Childhoods End?' notwithstanding, the album is a wonderfully moody, atmospheric, epic work that flew in the face of fashion then (despite reaching number one in the album chart), and continues to do so now. The great thing is that 'Misplaced Childhood' is all the better for it.
First class.
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19 of 20 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars You've never heard Misplaced Childhood? Where were you?, 13 Sep 2001
By A Customer
This review is from: Misplaced Childhood (Audio CD)
It seems you really did misplace your childhood... It's an album that by its very existance made growing up a more fulfilling experience... identifying with songs of lost love and memories gone by, and yet leaving the listener with a thoughtfull optimism which is really what makes the album work well as a whole, yet the majority of tracks stand out on their own merits both musically and lyrically.
Unlike other concept albums every song adds to the journey from the starting point "Pseudo Silk Kimono/Kayleigh" to its end "Childhood's End/White Feather", an effortless, beautiful experience.
I definately recommend this album to anyone old enough to remember the singles Kayliegh & Lavender - when you hear them here in context they send shivers down the spine!!
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18 of 19 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Personally, I blame Neil, 17 Dec 2000
By 
Philip Cass "sheikyerbouti, UAE" (Abu Dhabi United Arab Emirates) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Misplaced Childhood (Audio CD)
I was watching the Young Ones, which the Australian Broadcasting Commission first showed about 11.30pm. In one episode the boys were watching the little blob of light and Neil was humming along to the tone signal. Then he mournfully enquired why they didn't play any music he liked, like Marillion. Now, understand that I was living in Townsville, in North Queensland, about as far away from the world as you can get, but I figured that if Neil liked something it must be good. So, next day I went to my favourite record shop and asked the proprietor if he'd heard of Marillion. "Oh God," Gary said. "I knew it wouldn't take long." He sold me a copy of Misplaced Childhood. I took it home and was utterly and completely blown away. The lines about the Magdelene are still hauntingly beautiful.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A dream made real., 8 Oct 2000
By A Customer
This review is from: Misplaced Childhood (Audio CD)
Misplaced Childhood belongs to a time and a place forever locked inside me. I was 17, in love for the first time and just coming to grips with my own identity. The lyrical content and the sheer tumbling, turbulent emotion of the album chrystallised the experience of being 17 in 1985. The album's centrepiece 'Blind Curve' is pretty much a metaphor for adolescence emerging clumsily into adulthood, confused and insecure about the world and everyone's place in it. 'Kayleigh' was of course the Big Hit. Number 2 no less, and a more perfectly structured love song has yet to be written. Marbled through with bitterness, regret, and finally simple joy, Misplaced Childhood remains a sublime journey through the consciousness of a confused soul. And that's just what I was in 1985. An adolescent dream made real.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Brilliant, 28 Aug 2007
This review is from: Misplaced Childhood (Audio CD)
I bought this LP (yes LP) in 1986 and the CD a few years later. One word, brilliant! Up there with the Floyd, Genesis and The Beatles as far as concept albums are concerned. Buy this if you have at least one musical bone in your body.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Hide it from your friends, 2 Dec 2009
By 
Mr. H. C. Dunne (England) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Misplaced Childhood (MP3 Download)
One of the best albums ever made.....ooh big statement.
Marillion, when I was 17 were completely at odds with my musical taste.I was into The Jam,The WHO,Northern Soul and being a mod really.But of course in pubs and clubs you hear things, and I heard 'Kayleigh'. One day in John Menzies (remember them?), I thought I'd buy this album just to see what all this 'new prog' was all about. Twenty six years later I can still say this is one of the best albums I've ever heard. Musically,lyrically and the track order is almost perfect.
If you've never heard this album.....you really should.Don't lend it to your mates....they'll keep it....
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Was it Really That Long Ago ?, 15 May 2009
By 
Mr. G. Foxton (THIRSK, NORTH YORKS United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Misplaced Childhood (Audio CD)
The test of a truly great album is that you listen to it on release, again ten years later and again in another ten and it is still as powerful and relevant as the first time.

This is great album.

Originally released in 1985 it spawned two massive hit singles in Kayleigh and Lavender and it is amazing even now to hear how they fit into the whole even though you may have heard the former so often you may be sick of it.

Those are not really the highlights either. My highspots are Heart of Lothian and Childhood's End. The sudden switch from Lords of The Backstage into Blind Curve literally makes the hairs on the back of your neck stand up.

Great words and vocals from Fish, great playing from the rest, this was to be the first Marillions finest hour. The follow up Clutching at Straws was good but not as good as this.

If you don't own or haven't heard this album yet you should.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Marillion's rock opera and the finest hour of their careers, 23 Nov 2009
By 
Deven Gadula (san francisco, ca, united states) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Misplaced Childhood (Audio CD)
Misplaced Childhood was released by Marillion in 1985 as their 3rd studio album following their debut Script For A Jester's Tear (1983) and Fugazi (1984). Fugazi is considered by many to be their strongest, more diverse release with songs rather than fragments but Misplaced Childhood carries certain strength and originality I am really attracted to. It was to be the one before last studio album of Marillion with Fish as vocalist. Neither their last common album nor the many albums coming out of the separate ways of both Marillion and Fish, in my mind exceeded the greatness of Fugazi and Misplaced Childhood.
Misplaced Childhood is a sort of a fragmented story with many different topics going on, but do not try to find too much underlying meaning in the concept, as it was a fruit of an acid overdose by Fish...at the pretty bad time for him personally. He was on tour and dealing with the break up with his long term girlfriend as well as the death of his friend whom the album was dedicated to. The overall concept although extremely poetic and confusing seems to have forgiveness to self and rejection of war as main themes somehow coming out of it. 'I will wear your white feather, I will carry your white flag, I will swear I have no nation, 'cos I'm proud to own my heart' becomes the most important final statement Fish leaves us behind.
Musically this album is a sort of a fragmented rock opera with hardly enough music to carry everything the vocalist wants to express. It is a very even album and it should be listen continuously as a concept album it is, but my most favorite parts are Blind Curve, a long suite composed of 5 parts and Lavender. The climate of this entire album is, to me at least, one of a kind.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Timeless classic, 25 Oct 2002
By A Customer
This review is from: Misplaced Childhood (Audio CD)
A clasic album with very powerful songs and emotions. Peaks with the uplifting "Childhoods End & White Feather" that will make you wounder why you havent heard them before! This is Fish at his best.
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10 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Still great after all these years!, 28 Feb 2000
By A Customer
This review is from: Misplaced Childhood (Audio CD)
Marillion might no longer be flavour of the month, but this remastered version of their 80's classic is a vibrant reminder of the 'good old days'. 'Misplaced Childhood' is probably famous for contain the Band's two most successful songs - Kayleigh and Lavender - but it is difficult to rate this album purely by its individual songs. This is after all a concept album, and we are meant to regard it as one piece of music. However, unlike so many epic concept albums of the 70's, this one actually works!
This reissue not only presents us with a 24-bit remastered version of the original album tracks, a lavish booklet containing details of the recording session, but it also includes a second CD with B-sides and alternative versions, plus all the songs from the album in demo form. This demo is of course not as classy as the final version, however, we can see how the album developed, from Fish's early lyrics to the massive drum sound (drummers will love this demo version).
All in all a really good buy. Whether you own a battered vinyl copy, which you bought first time round, or even if you have never heard vintage Marillion, this album is surely the one to go for.
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