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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
on 16 September 2011
This album marks Abney Park's departure from Goth rock to Steampunk. The cover gives a taste of what the music is about: clockwork dolls, strange inventions, Victorian obsessions and dirigibles, the ubiquitous modes of transport of steampunk. But what's the music about? Is it worth listening to - even if (or especially if) you are not interested in steampunk?
The answer is yes!
This is an excellent mix of heavy guitars, quite dark, hectic vocals and more world-music and folk style elements, such as violins, Arabian and electronic sounds.
The album starts with the heavy throbbing of rotor blades and the very upbeat "Airship Pirates", a sort of rock shanty that is a lot more light-hearted than the rest of the album, although even here the edges are smudged. The songs are quite varied, the lead singer's vocals hurrying through the text effectively, building a dark world of mystery, obsession and tension. Incorporated into the songs are electronic throbbings, cogs whizzing and steam pumping, true to the steampunk backdrop. The choruses aren't always the best, textually, but they work musically. There's a lot of bravado and risk-taking on this album (can you really fill a whole album with songs that revolve around clockwork and steam?), but it pays off beautifully. There's not a weak song on the album. Particularly noteworthy are "She" - as obsessive and hooking as the woman the song is about - "Virus" - an electronically backed nod to H.G. Wells and the Victorians' preoccupation with disease and "I Am Stretched on Your Grave" - a modern take on an Irish ballad, to name only a few.
The only downside of this album is that it's so short. I've been playing it on repeat for more than a week now and have not tired of it yet. Abney Park deserve to be more widely known and listened to. Definitely one to get into, whether you're into steampunk or not.
P.S. The last track, when downloaded, is spelt incorrectly; it should be "postapocalypse".
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on 16 September 2011
This album marks Abney Park's departure from Goth rock to Steampunk. The cover gives a taste of what the music is about: clockwork dolls, strange inventions, Victorian obsessions and dirigibles, the ubiquitous modes of transport of steampunk. But what's the music about? Is it worth listening to - even if (or especially if) you are not interested in steampunk?
The answer is yes!
This is an excellent mix of heavy guitars, quite dark, hectic vocals and more world-music and folk style elements, such as violins, Arabian and electronic sounds.
The album starts with the heavy throbbing of rotor blades and the very upbeat "Airship Pirates", a sort of rock shanty that is a lot more light-hearted than the rest of the album, although even here the edges are smudged. The songs are quite varied, the lead singer's vocals hurrying through the text effectively, building a dark world of mystery, obsession and tension. Incorporated into the songs are electronic throbbings, cogs whizzing and steam pumping, true to the steampunk backdrop. The choruses aren't always the best, textually, but they work musically. There's a lot of bravado and risk-taking on this album (can you really fill a whole album with songs that revolve around clockwork and steam?), but it pays off beautifully. There's not a weak song on the album. Particularly noteworthy are "She" - as obsessive and hooking as the woman the song is about - "Virus" - an electronically backed nod to H.G. Wells and the Victorians' preoccupation with disease and "I Am Stretched on Your Grave" - a modern take on an Irish ballad, to name only a few.
The only downside of this album is that it's so short. I've been playing it on repeat for more than a week now and have not tired of it yet. Abney Park deserve to be more widely known and listened to. Definitely one to get into, whether you're into steampunk or not.
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on 6 January 2011
On paper, a balladering steam-punk band pretending to be airship pirates seems a concept album too far. However, Abney Park accomplish this with aplomb. The instrumentation, especially the violinist, provide a fine musical accompaniment to this collection of eclectic steam-punk pieces.
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