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52 of 53 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Once in a lifetime
Before David Byrne's collaboration with X-Press 2,"Lazy", Talking Heads had fallen off the critical radar and disappeared from public consciousness. It is high time they were credited for "Remain in Light" and this, easily the best live concert of all time. Audio releases of the concert (especially the original nine track version) do the visual power of the concert an...
Published on 13 Mar 2003 by degrant

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10 of 14 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Don't buy this sub par version.
Track 11 - "Naive Melody" was out of sync. Need I say more? No, But I will anyway. Unlike another version of this concert DVD currently for sale on Amazon this one contains no audio commentary and no bonus tracks. The one I bought from videosanddvds for a fiver was for the dutch market and had no booklet or insert (perhaps there wasn't meant to be, despite the holding...
Published on 3 Oct 2007 by T. Hughes


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52 of 53 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Once in a lifetime, 13 Mar 2003
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Before David Byrne's collaboration with X-Press 2,"Lazy", Talking Heads had fallen off the critical radar and disappeared from public consciousness. It is high time they were credited for "Remain in Light" and this, easily the best live concert of all time. Audio releases of the concert (especially the original nine track version) do the visual power of the concert an injustice even though "Slippery People" "Burning Down the House" and "Take Me to the River" better the respective studio versions.
The pacing of the film is exemplary: the gradual addition of musicians provides the context for David Byrne's metamorphosis from tense New Waver to full-on funkster. And while the rest of the Heads, augmented by musicians of the class and charisma of Bernie Worrell and Alex Weir amongst others, play brilliantly, Byrne steals the show. He is more compelling than Michael Stipe in "Tourfilm", Bjork at the Royal Opera House last year or anyone else you care to mention.
Thankfully the classic "I Zimbra/Big Business" (the latter a Byrne solo number from "Songs from the Catherine Wheel") is included as an extra and proves one of the many highlights of the disc. Making further great use of DVD's potential, the disc provides the viewer with a choice of sounds tracks. While the concert sound was always good, the remastered track blows it away for clarity, depth and feeling. The voiceover gives great history and background and is good accompaniment to "Fa Fa Fa Fa Fa Fa", the biography of the band which reveals the extent of the inevitable animosity as Byrne garnered all the plaudits.
Accusations that this is over-rated and dated are without foundation as well as explanation. While the music is still great (same as it ever was), the influence of the visualisation of the concert is palpable: countless subsequent concerts/live performances such as REM's "Tourfilm" and U2's "Zooroopa" are unthinkable without "Stop Making Sense".
"Stop Making Sense" manages to be simulataneously cerebral and celebratory, enigmatic and ecstatic. In short, unmissable.
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11 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Tiptop re-release and excellent use of medium, 4 Jan 2001
By A Customer
At last a DVD that makes use of the technical advantages of the medium. Looks and sounds so much better than the video. Includes the original set design diagrams with notes by Byrne. An amazing concert concept brilliantly brought to life - the remixed sound is incredibly lifelike.
If only more bands bothered to put this much thought into their live shows... ;-) Highly recommended
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21 of 22 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The best concert movie - even if you aren't a fan..., 11 May 2004
By 
lexo1941 (Edinburgh, Scotland) - See all my reviews
"Stop Making Sense" changed my life. The album, actually, not the film; I was 15, on a disastrous school trip to Amsterdam (I know, I know, what were they thinking sending a bunch of drink-and-drug crazed mid-teens to Amsterdam, of all places) and somebody lent me a tape of the original soundtrack album, a great Talking Heads primer in its own right. I had been having a spectacularly bad time, and had never much liked the Heads before, but somewhere in there I glimpsed the psychodrama, so much clearer in the movie, of a nerdy white boy loosening up - and I never looked back.
This is the greatest concert movie ever made because it works as a movie, even if you aren't much of a fan of Talking Heads' music (and God knows, I got over my subsequent obsession with them). From David Byrne's hopeful, intellectual-at-summer-camp rendition of "Psycho Killer" all the way to the manic version of "Crosseyed and Painless", it builds and builds and grips your attention. The most striking thing about it, watching it again 20 years later, is just how much this foursome of uptight preppies could rock. Their enjoyment of their own music is genuine, unforced and palpable. Byrne cheerfully admits on the commentary that he was going through a "dictator" phase at the time, to the point that he wouldn't even allow plastic cups of water onstage, because it would spoil the visual effect; if ever a band needed them, it was this one. In the studio, they could sound clipped and filtered to a fare-thee-well, but live, they had a real swing. The extra musicians are superb (it's worth watching just for Lynn Mabry and Ednah Holt's wacky dance moves) but the drama of the film is in the sequencing of the songs, the passion of the performances, and the care with with Jonathan Demme registers the interactions between the musicians.
The commentary is fun (Tina Weymouth's sardonic remarks about her shapeless stage costume are priceless) and if you happen to have digital audio, I'm sure it sounds fab. Even on my analogue telly, it's a beauty; all the evidence you need to refute the idea that Talking Heads were too clever and not a real band. I could still wish that the Dolette McDonald/Nona Hendryx/Busta Jones/Adrian Belew lineup was caught on film, but until they see fit to rerelease "The Name of This Band is Talking Heads" on CD, this is, as stated above, a guaranteed cure for the blues and the closest any of us will ever get to being there. Outstanding.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A fine music DVD - a must have for your collection, 10 Mar 2000
By A Customer
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A very energetic performance by David Byrne and Talking Heads. Superb music brought to life by a very well mixed 5.1 soundtrack and stunning visuals. The DVD has a fair selection of extras too. By far the best music DVD I have seen.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Everything I expected it to be, 17 Mar 2011
This review is from: Stop Making Sense [Blu-ray] [1984] [1985] (Blu-ray)
I was 15 when this movie came out. The songs psychokiller, burning down the house, were great hits in my opninion. But when you are 15 you do not have the resources to buy all the things you want. But as I got older, it gets easier. So now I am catching up, I buy stuff I always wanted to have.
So when I watched this movie, it exceded my expectations... This is what I wanted it to be. I still think David Byrne personificates the Talking Heads, he is the group. The extra's on are also worth watching. Especially the interview they gave in 2000 to celebrate the 15th birthday of the DVD.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Brilliant Exception, 13 Feb 2011
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Live albums are usually disappointing (the sound mix is either too flat or too boomy, the audience noise can detract from rather than enhance the atmosphere, and most bands cannot capture the same feel "live" that they achieve in the studio). Live concert films compound the problem - with poor visuals, bad lighting, and a boring mix of close/mid/long range shots.

"Stop Making Sense" is one of the brilliant exceptions. It is successful because although it was staged as a conceptual documentary record - a post-modern attempt to deconstruct "live" performance - it actually provided a much better platform in which to experience Talking Heads in concert. The song selection is great (although I'm still not sure about the Tom Tom Club contribution...) and draws on all of the Heads' albums to date, especially the peak period of "Fear Of Music"/"Remain In Light". The visuals are intriguing throughout (use of camera angles, lighting and stage sets). And David Byrne is on fire as a shamanic presence leading the band through a mesmerising performance.

My only complaint is that the DVD extras are rather lame - surely there is some interesting rehearsal footage out there?
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Definite improvement with blu-ray, 17 Nov 2010
This review is from: Stop Making Sense [Blu-ray] [1984] [1985] (Blu-ray)
I have owned the dvd for many years and watched it often. It is such a great concert imho. Now having purchased the blu-ray version I have no regrets. The picture seems lighter, as well as the improved definition, which means I can see things I could not see before - for example the audience. I have played both through the same equipment tonight and the improvement in sound and picture is well worth the cost.
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars If Carlsberg Made Concert Films This Would Be it, 6 Jun 2002
By 
J. E. Parry "Jeff Parry" (Pontypool, Wales) - See all my reviews
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Rightly regarded as the best ever concert film. From the "Big Suit" to the gradual addition of each band member as the songs build. This is what proved the talking Heads to be one of the first multimedia performers.
The band rock and the audience enjoys. Remastered and digitally enhanced compared to the video version.
An all time materpiece.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Brilliant live album, 8 Sep 2011
This review is from: Stop Making Sense [Blu-ray] [1984] [1985] (Blu-ray)
This is an excellent live album. Many live albums are dull-- worse versions of studio tracks. This one is not. One of the main reasons is unsung genius Bernie Worrell, a man of few words but much music, who no one else seems to know of (in these reviews). He gave the Talking Heads their funky sound-- he was behind the more progressive sound of Funkadelic too. He got them to translate their songs into lives versions and be *funky*. Watch the video "Stranger on Earth" and David Byrne and Tina Weymouth talk about his influence on them. Why did the static Talking Heads start to dance?
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars One of the very best, 25 Feb 2011
By 
R. Angel "newangel9" (civic, act Australia) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Stop Making Sense [Blu-ray] [1984] [1985] (Blu-ray)
I bought Stop making Sense on VHS back in the Eighties after seeing the movie at a cinema.I was a big fan of Talking Heads but after they disbanded I stopped listening to their music and it is not until very recently that I have rediscovered what a great band they were and this concert is the absolute peak of their career.

Believe the other 5 star reviews here.I read them and thought why not check them out again.The energy coming off the stage is almost palpable.If you have even a half decent sound system just turn it up .Every song is great and the visual and sound quality are top class.A must have for any Talking Heads fan.
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Stop Making Sense [Blu-ray] [1984] [1985]
Stop Making Sense [Blu-ray] [1984] [1985] by Jonathan Demme (Blu-ray - 2010)
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