Customer Reviews


60 Reviews
5 star:
 (43)
4 star:
 (12)
3 star:
 (3)
2 star:
 (2)
1 star:    (0)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


20 of 20 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Moving
Though there is some debate about whether it is REM's best work, Out of Time is without doubt a classic.
Most people will have only heard of Losing My Religion, deservedly one of their biggest hits, but beyond that the songs that will stay with you just keep coming.
Happy songs are what the album is best known for and the jangling, uplifting pop of Near Wild...
Published on 3 Jun 2003 by jack_hartt

versus
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Shiny, Happy Music (albeit rather insubstantial), June 16, 2004
OUT OF TIME stands as something of a paradox in R.E.M.'s discography. Even though it's R.E.M.'s most inconsistent album, OUT OF TIME ushered in a new, radical phase in the band's career, moving them far and away from such groundbreaking recordings as MURMER or RECKONING. Because of the massive hit "Losing My Religion," R.E.M. came out from the underground and began their...
Published 22 months ago by Mike London


‹ Previous | 1 26 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

20 of 20 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Moving, 3 Jun 2003
This review is from: Out of Time (Audio CD)
Though there is some debate about whether it is REM's best work, Out of Time is without doubt a classic.
Most people will have only heard of Losing My Religion, deservedly one of their biggest hits, but beyond that the songs that will stay with you just keep coming.
Happy songs are what the album is best known for and the jangling, uplifting pop of Near Wild Heaven, Texakarna and Half A World Away are melodic easy to listen to but with more depth than your average rock song.
The true quality of the album though is in the darker, more introverted songs. Low is a stripped down, rhythmic examination of the end of a relationship, looking back and climaxing in an emotive acceptance of moving on.
Country Feedback however, is my true favourite, an orchestrated ballad of missed opportunities, drenched in fatigue and a general feeling of being washed out and drained (You come to me with excuses/Ducked out in a row/You wear me out). The slow, simple guitar accompanied by strings fills the background while a wailing, almost atonal lead guitar melody weaves around the lyrics and sears its way into your brain.
You need this.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


12 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Genius., 23 Mar 2003
By 
P. Wilde "Picnic" (North east England, UK.) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Out of Time (Audio CD)
This was the first REM album I listened to and , although I have listened to all their subsequent albums and Document, Life's Rich Pageant and Green before it, it still remains the most pleasurable. Like most REM albums, it has multiple meanings but it has generally come to be regarded as their 'love' album. This effect is partly achieved by Kate Pierson's warm and lively presence on tracks like Shiny Happy People and Me in Honey. To me, this album sounds like a lost summer, the mandolins and baroque instrumentation mourning loss of love, loss of lots of things. Automatic for the People would wallow more blatantly in nostalgia on Man on the Moon and politics in Drive and Ignoreland and twisted the tunes even more than Country Feedback was threatening on OOT. Their ultimate twisted album to come was Monster, that picked up where Automatic's Star Me Kitten left off.
So Out of Time is a lot of things- KRS-One's funny, ironic rap that makes you think (Radio Song) a sunny surf/road album (Near Wild Heaven, Texarkana), a baroque meditation (Losing my religion, Endgame, Half the World Away), and something inbetween (Shiny Happy People). The likes of Low and Belong sound ancient and tribal, a perfect counter-evolution of the Beach Boy style harmonies. But there is nothing simple about the thought processes behind this album- it takes a lot of intelligence, a lot of avant-garde thinking, to sound this upbeat yet this sombre. Michael Stipe's warm, resonant voice is recorded in digital while the instruments are recorded by analogue. The cover art and inside sleeves are, Green to some extent aside, clear and attractive for a change. Natural images of plant-life and the ocean are juxtaposed with their treatment- rendered in artistic photography, cut up, their colour changed and reinstalled like the marble steps and peep show images displayed in the sleeve's cartoons. The album looks lovely, the sound is crystal clear and it resonates with that sense of being revolutionary yet innocent that fully emerged, blinking in the summer of the very early nineties, from the likes of The La's, The Stone Roses and, in their own, more directly destructive way, Nirvana. To any ordinary band, this would be, undisputedly, their finest moment, but REM, almost unique amongst the majority of bands, have always had the intelligence and staying power to evolve on their best ideas. A work of genius.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars rem triumph with this jingly,jangly,bittersweet,mix., 31 July 2002
This review is from: Out of Time (Audio CD)
if you only buy one rem album,make it this one.never have a band broken free from the'college band'shackles produced an album encompassing so many styles.beautifull,jangly and melancholic are words that spring to mind.from the funky 'radio song' to the emotional and profoundly massive breakthrough anthem 'losing my religion' to the ironic pop of 'shiny happy people',stopping of at the beautiful 'me in honey' and the touching pop of'near wild heaven' and texarkana'.And what makes this so great is the varying of the vocals.guest appearances from the talented kate pierson and krs-1 and the majestic mike mills.buy it!now!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Brilliant sound, profound songs, 18 Oct 2002
By 
Pieter Uys "Toypom" (Johannesburg) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)    (HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)   
This review is from: Out of Time (Audio CD)
This album just overflows with quality songs like Radio Song, Shiny Happy People and Losing My Religion. Other highlights are Half A World Away, Texarkana and Near Wild Heaven. The melodies, lyrics and harmonising are just perfect, making up an album of superior melodic rock songs. The lyrics are gripping and poetic throughout. Rock doesn't come better than this. A classic!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Superb! - REM at the top of their game., 24 July 2000
By A Customer
This review is from: Out of Time (Audio CD)
An absolutely fantastic album, every song is of the very highest calibre. "Losing My Religion" and "Shiny Happy People" are the easiest listening tracks, but once you get into this album you'll want to listen to it over and over again.
"Out of Time" is second only to the wonderful "Automatic For The People".
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Probably one of the best albums I own. Still., 25 Mar 2001
By 
stigofthedump@talk21.com (Thornbury, Bristol. England) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Out of Time (Audio CD)
Oh yes. Ten years after Out of Time was released, and it still ranks as one of my Favourite Albums of All Time. I've always liked R.E.M. - undergoing something of a renaissance in my listening at the moment - and this is almost undoubtedly the high point in their elephantine career. Not only are the singles there - Losing My Religion and Shiny Happy People being the obvious examples - but there is not a single track that can be seen as "filler". Indeed, it's the quieter, less accessible songs that grow with time. My favourites? Belong and Country Feedback. If you do one thing today, buy this album. Hurrah.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A tour-de-force by a band at the peak of their powers, 6 Feb 2000
By A Customer
This review is from: Out of Time (Audio CD)
On first listening, this album struck me as,(Shiny Happy People excepted),a difficult, distant album. It rewards repeated listening. Songs like "Half a world away","Losing my Religion"(a classic)and "Belong" seem to reveal more about themselves with every listen.When listening to this album,one piece of advice: If at first you don't succeed,try,try,again
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars REM at their best, 4 Aug 2000
By A Customer
This review is from: Out of Time (Audio CD)
This is my all time favorite REM album. Some classic acoustic guitar tracks and not a monster album electric twang to be heard (Monster album lovers - this is different from what you're used to!). I especially like the superbly miserable 'Country Feedback', but the beautiful 'Half a world away' is my number one. A must have for the REM collecter.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Shiny, Happy Music (albeit rather insubstantial), June 16, 2004, 11 Sep 2012
This review is from: Out of Time (Audio CD)
OUT OF TIME stands as something of a paradox in R.E.M.'s discography. Even though it's R.E.M.'s most inconsistent album, OUT OF TIME ushered in a new, radical phase in the band's career, moving them far and away from such groundbreaking recordings as MURMER or RECKONING. Because of the massive hit "Losing My Religion," R.E.M. came out from the underground and began their mainstream career. While all the subsequent records (AUTOMATIC, MONSTER, NEW ADVENTURES, UP, and REVEAL) have moved them further along the lines of reinventing their sound, this transformation started here.

Ironically enough, this is R.E.M.'s worst album, although this is the very record that broke them into mainstream and enabled them to make some of the greatest music of their career. While many purists despise this album, I personally feel that without this record which brought R.E.M. such massive success, we wouldn't have those great later day records. It may have turned off a lot of fans, but OUT OF TIME brought R.E.M. to national attention. Still, it can be hard to swallow some of this record.

Filled with sonic grooves and textures, bright, shinny production, and lots of outside collaboration, OUT OF TIME finds R.E.M. moving away from the more jangly pop and underground sound of their IRS years to a more mainstream, streamlined sound. ("Radio Song," one of the more bizaare collaborations with rapper KRS-1, is a fun, jaunty little song, but still sounds, after all these years, as a rather misguided and a largely failed experiment.) The biggest problem with OUT OF TIME is, after the record finishes, there's not a lot to return too. It's a shiny, happy record, without much substance.

Any record where the production is more noteworthy than the songwriting is in deep trouble, and that is exactly where OUT OF TIME suffers. I do admire the band's ambition to broaden and deepen their sound, bringing in mandolins, keyboards, and even string sections. It's just the songs on OUT OF TIME are so breezy and insubstantial that is plays like a 1970s Wings album. It gets in a mellow, sunny groove, more concentrated on making a pleasant summer record than making lasting music. Like "Shiny Happy People," OUT OF TIME is a great catchy album overall but when it comes down too it, stripping away all the bright production and concentrating on the album itself, there's not really that much to it. Even the title has that tossed off feel. The band laterally ran out of time to come up with a title, hence the name.

However, when the band does get the songwriting right, then OUT OF TIME strikes gold. The aforementioned "Losing My Religion" deserves all the acclaim it gets. (Who'd think a mandolin driven song would be such a huge hit???) "Half a World Away," "Texarkana," and "Near Wild Heaven" are essential songs. Also, the two outtakes on the bonus disc from IN TIME, R.E.M.'s recently released greatest hits compilation, would have greatly aided this record. "Fretless" and "It's a Free World Baby" are both more substantial than most of the material here and Buck even said to send in a resequenced setlsit to the band because they were thinking about reissuing this album with these two songs incorporated into it.

The real masterpiece, however, is the phenomenal song "Country Feedback." Capturing a general psychic unrest and a searching for meaning, "Country Feedback" is easily my favorite song on the album and one of my top ten R.E.M. songs. The lyrics reminds me "E Bow the Letter." Both "E Bow" and "Country Feedback" have a very distinctive, haunting style that never fails to capture my ear, with wonderful, free association lyrics wedded with R.E.M.'s great instrumental sensibilities. One of R.E.M.'s best. Great live version on IN TIME on the B-Side disc.

In the end, OUT OF TIME never really offends; it just never really makes you think other than the two aforementioned masterpieces. It's a pretty fun record to listen too, but not something to return too time and time again. It's ironic that this is the album that catapulted them into mainstream radio, given OUT OF TIME's spotty nature. R.E.M. made great records before this, and they made wonderful records after this. We can thank OUT OF TIME for coming at that critical juncture, that linchpin record that secured R.E.M. a place in 1990s mainstream rock. Just wish it was a more substantial record than what it is.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The best album ever, that no-one cottoned on over at the time, 8 July 2012
By 
Craig P Eyles (Blackthorn, Oxon United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Out of Time (Audio CD)
You have to hear it over twenty years after you first heard it to realize it is/was/remains the best album ever.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 26 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

Only search this product's reviews