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29 of 29 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Method in their madness...
Firstly, for anyone not in the know, The Duckworth Lewis Method is an Irish duo comprised of Neil Hannon (The Divine Comedy) and Thomas Walsh (Pugwash) and they describe this, their debut (and surely only?) album as "a kaleidoscopic musical adventure through the beautiful and rather silly world of cricket.". Yes, you read that right, it's a concept album about the sport...
Published on 7 Nov. 2009 by Andy Sweeney

versus
1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars But I was not as happy with this CD as the others in my collection
Amazon delivered as expected, thank-you. But I was not as happy with this CD as the others in my collection, maybe I'm not as familiar with cricket language as I thought I was.
Published 9 months ago by Adrienne Tregonning


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29 of 29 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Method in their madness..., 7 Nov. 2009
By 
Andy Sweeney "music was my first love" (Brighton, East Sussex) - See all my reviews
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Firstly, for anyone not in the know, The Duckworth Lewis Method is an Irish duo comprised of Neil Hannon (The Divine Comedy) and Thomas Walsh (Pugwash) and they describe this, their debut (and surely only?) album as "a kaleidoscopic musical adventure through the beautiful and rather silly world of cricket.". Yes, you read that right, it's a concept album about the sport of cricket. Wait, please come back, keep reading - it's much better than it sounds, I promise. In fact, if you're a fan of The Divine Comedy, you're more than likely going to love this extremely light-hearted, melodic album because, if not for Walsh's involvement, this could easily have been released under that moniker and nobody would have batted an eyelid. It may even have sold better, but that's pure speculation. If not for the Irish blood running throughout this release, you could be forgiven for saying that "The Duckworth Lewis Method" is a thoroughly English album - to be frank, because of the subject matter, I'm doubtful of the international appeal of their self-titled debut, but I could be wrong. I can see this being regarded as the "Village Green Preservation Society" for 2009.

Even if you're not well versed in the rules of or the characters in cricket, hopefully the music should be enough to keep you listening and appreciate what is on offer here. There are shades of classic and eccentric melodic rock in the vein of ELO, XTC, The Beatles, The Beach Boys and, perhaps not surprisingly, early Divine Comedy, all of which are more than apparent on the magnificent "Gentlemen and Players". The vaudeville elements of the album bring to mind Noel Coward, Paul McCartney and even Flanders & Swann in the case of the incredible "Jiggery Pokery", the hilarious story of the "Ball Of The Century" delivered by Shane Warne to a hapless Mike Gatting. It's a beautifully eclectic album as well, taking in electronically-enhanced glam-rock stompers such as the funny, double-entendre filled "Sweet Spot", the jazz-touches of "The Age Of Revolution", the sumptuous baroque, harpsichord pop of "Flatten The Hay" and the soaring ballad "The Nightwatchman" which seems to fit in somewhere between the realms of Scott Walker and Jeff Lynne at their headiest powers. Speaking of Jeff Lynne, there are very strong echoes of The Electric Light Orchestra on the album closer, "The End Of The Over" - very "Out Of The Blue".

Although I'm well aware that this record may not be everybody's cup of tea, personally, I love it and can't find fault with any of the contents at all. The whole project is played out with loving care, craftsmanship and irrepressible charm. Each and every track hits the sweet spot for me and I can't recommend it highly enough. Pardon the pun, but it's hit me for six. Well played, chaps!
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars "Now we're driving Bentleys, playing twenty20!", 17 Sept. 2009
This is a gem of an album. As a career-long fan of The Divine Comedy I was finding it hard to love their (Hannon's) two most recent albums, but The Duckworth Lewis Method is a masterful return to form. This the Neil Hannon of "Promenade" and "Cassanova": beautifully crafted songs, genuinely witty and engaging lyrics (unless you are Mike Gatting) laid over a swathe of gorgeous melodies. Songs such as "The Nightwatchman" and "The Age of Revolution" must rank amongst Hannon's finest work.

And not forgetting his collaborator Thomas Walsh who is fifty percent responsible for this brilliant record.

If you like cricket you will love the album even more; if not then there is still a huge amount to enjoy.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars pleasantly surprised, 8 Jun. 2010
By 
Barbara L. Bradley "blogger" (Scotland) - See all my reviews
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I finally bought this cd after holding back for a while from buying it. I'm a big Divine Comedy fan and I've bought nearly every album but because this album was about cricket,( a sport i have very little interest in or knowledge of), I did hesitate.
At first listen, from the first song I was hooked by the catchy tunes, clever and funny lyrics and the various types of musical styles used. The collaboration between Neil Hannon and Thomas Walsh on this album works well, the contrastig tones of their voices and the clever arrangement of songs. Even though I do not watch cricket, the way the sport is captured in the lyrics cathes my imagination and takes the listener back to a bygone era of British culture, producing a vision of Englishness where cricket is an sacred practise among 'gentlemen' and 'players'. Songs like 'Flatten the hay' also show the pleasure the sport gives and provides a idyll rural setting in contrast to green lawns and cricket stadium, showing that cricket is enjoyed outwith England and in various settings. 'Meeting Mr Mianband' and 'Jiggerypokery' (think I've spelt it right)
are also memorable songs and show the great talent of both artists, gave this album a try, it's worth it, the song writing and the music are refreshing and imaginative.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Howzat!, 26 Sept. 2010
By 
M. Joyce (Cairo, Egypt) - See all my reviews
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I'd always sort of known "The Divine Comedy"; I recalled their early hit, "National Express" and I was aware that that they (or rather Neil Hannon, who seems literally to be a "one man band") had written the theme tune to "Father Ted." Odd bits of their repertoire had come my way in the intervening years and I always found Mr Hannon to be a resourceful tunesmith and a witty lyricist. I was, therefore, intrigued to read of his collaboration with one Thomas Walsh (from a band called "Pugwash," apparently) in a concept album based on that most unlikely of musical topics, cricket, and one, moreover, with that most unlikely of titles, "The Duckworth Lewis Method." (I do in fact recall a song called "F**ck me, it's Fred Titmus," but cricket has hardly been a fruitful source of musical invention) I decided to throw caution to the farthest part of the longest boundary and buy the album and, blow me, it's a belter; tuneful, funny and beautifully produced. I'm sure that most people's favourite track will be "Jiggery Pokery" (about Shane Warne's dismissal of Mike Gatting in the Ashes series of 1993), but there are no duds. Buy it...it'll cheer you up no end!
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32 of 36 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars It shouldn't work. But it does., 30 Jun. 2009
By 
Nobby H. (Dublin, Ireland) - See all my reviews
It's very quirky and it's a cricket concept album. But never mind that. This record is choc full of mesmerizing pop gems, a real soundtrack to the summer with bouncy and funky tracks here, sweet smiley stuff there and, just over there, hilarity abounds. The only person who won't like this record is Mike Gatting. And even he'll probably like it.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Masterpiece in every way, 7 Sept. 2009
By 
Richard W. Beechey (Stamford Lincolnshire) - See all my reviews
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I could write pages and pages of a review for this album, but suffice to say that everything about it absolutely superb. The music is beautifully arranged and played, the songs are clever, sharp, witty and recall a gentler time and place. The CD artwork and actual CD itself in the form of a (tampered with?) cricket ball are wonderful.

Call me old fashioned, but at a time when the UK music scene is at an all time low (girlbands, rap, hiphop, X factor "winners" and rejects dominating the airwaves and charts)this Divine offering and it's well written crafted songs performed and written by true musician's at the top of their craft shines like a beacon (heck - that was a long sentance - even by my standards!)

As is said in other reviews, you definitely don't need to be a cricket fan to enjoy this. Certainly one of the albums of the year so far !
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15 of 17 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars DLM Explained, 16 Aug. 2009
By 
Ward-Minter (British Virgin Islands) - See all my reviews
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Great Album!!! I shall explain some of the cricket terms and names used in the album.

1) Duckworth-Lewis. A score generated scientifically when rain has interrupted play. It takes in to account existing score, overs left to play, wickets needed etc.

2) The coin toss. This happens at the start of each cricket game. The winner decides whether they want to bat or field first. Weather conditions etc, play a crucial role in which way to choose.

3) Twenty/20 (as hinted in "The Age of Revolution"). It is a relatively new form of the game where each team receives a maximum of just 120 balls each (20 overs). It is therefore a fast paced game with crowd pleasing big-hitting.

4) Gentlemen and Players. As cricket is steeped in Englishness, the landed gentry (Gentleman) used to play with the riff raff like me (Players)

5) The Sweet Spot. This is a scientific term used for a very small area of the cricket bat. When the player connects with this exact spot (called timing the ball) it will invariably go for a four (when the ball goes to the boundary line after it has grounded) or a six (when the ball goes over the line without bouncing)

6) Jiggery Pokery. This is all about Shane Warne. He was (and maybe still is) the greatest spinner of the cricket ball in history. The story tells of Mike Gatting facing Warnes first ball in English cricket. This has become known as "The Ball of the Century"

7) Mr. Javed Miandad. He was a great Pakistani cricketer. Not as prolific as Don Bradman (Aussie) but holds many records.

8) Dickie Bird. An exceptional cricket umpire, since retired.

9) Night-watchman. In test cricket when the play is due to end and the batting team lose a player, instead of sending out a new batsman, the captain sends a non-batsman to the crease. This preserves the proper batsman for tomorrows play. The non-batsman is told just to defend the wickets and not to get out. Sometimes they do, which is very embarrassing for the batting team.

10) "Athers" refers to Mike Atherton, a former English captain now a commentator for Sky Sports. Not a bad captain, but far from an historical best.

Anyway hope this helps the non-cricketers with this utterly brilliant CD.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Quintessentially English!, 10 Sept. 2009
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A fantastic collection of beautifully crafted pop songs. If you're a cricket fan you'll love it, if you're not then you'll still love it!. It's what makes the English different to the rest of the world . . . . what other nation has gifted the world such a unique sport?!!. Buy this CD and treat yourself to a genuine piece of musical genius. For best results, pop CD into your player, hit start, sit back and feel the warm smile on your face broaden as each track passes, BRILLIANT!!!
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Rain doesn't stop play, 10 Sept. 2009
By 
J. Hearson (Leeds, England) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Duckworth Lewis Method (MP3 Download)
If you love the Divine Comedy (and who could fail to?), you'll love DLM's eponymous debut (please say there'll be a second) album.

Even if you're not the greatest fan of cricket, the melodies will sweep over you and you'll find yourself humming them constantly - Jiggery Pokery and Meeting Mr Miandad being the standouts.

What better way to celebrate an Ashes-winning summer?
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23 of 27 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars You don't have to be a cricket fan to enjoy this!, 1 July 2009
This is the soundtrack to the summer - light, gentle, mellow, whimsical and melodic. If you like either Pugwash or The Divine Comedy, you won't be disappointed by this collaboration.

It doesn't matter if you don't know the first thing about cricket: this is an album best listened to relaxing in the sunshine and it'll bring a smile to your face.
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