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5.0 out of 5 stars DARK AND DREAMY, AWAYDAYS IS STREETS AHEAD OF ITS RIVALS
Like Football Factiory, Awaydays is based on a novel, this time by Kevin Sampson. May be it is just such a relief to get away from all those London geezers and rubbish references to West Ham's ICF, but this is vastly superior stuff. The location is NOT Liverpool,. but Birkenhead, across the water. There are few loveable Scallies here. The local firm here is 'the Pack.' It...
Published 2 months ago by SIMMO SEZ

versus
2.0 out of 5 stars Scores an own goal....Several times...
Another year, another film about football, and the cult that is hooliganism.

This time, they have Stephen Graham in a del-boy jacket and cool moustache and a quite good soundtrack to try and sell the film. It all fails miserably.

It's the everyday story of a young lad who is bored with life, is at a football match and sees some violence and wants in,...
Published 10 days ago by Corey Newcombe


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5.0 out of 5 stars DARK AND DREAMY, AWAYDAYS IS STREETS AHEAD OF ITS RIVALS, 27 Mar. 2015
This review is from: Awaydays [DVD] (DVD)
Like Football Factiory, Awaydays is based on a novel, this time by Kevin Sampson. May be it is just such a relief to get away from all those London geezers and rubbish references to West Ham's ICF, but this is vastly superior stuff. The location is NOT Liverpool,. but Birkenhead, across the water. There are few loveable Scallies here. The local firm here is 'the Pack.' It is not spelled out in the film, but presumably this is the hard edge of Tranmere Rovers' away support. They wear casuals and carry Stanley knives and travel by train. This is late seventies/early 80s and Joy Division dominates the soundtrack. Nicky Bell's 19-year-old Carty lost his mother recently. He wants, or thinks he wants, acceptance and status from getting into the Pack, led by the seriously nasty ex-squaddie Godden, who demands the blind loyalty of a gang of thuggish youngsters. Disillusioned pack member Elvis urges Carty to dream bigger. They share a world of brooding, moody music and staring out to see. Things could be so much better if...Elvis is smitten, but confused. Carty should be back at art school and being nicer to his younger but wiser sister. It can all get a tad intense, but the bawdy bits, including a botched sexual initiation, are funny and human. Oliver Lee's 'Baby' is genuinely scary. Elvis and Carty's friendship is troubled but convincing. Flawed, but noble.
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2.0 out of 5 stars Scores an own goal....Several times..., 16 May 2015
This review is from: Awaydays [DVD] (DVD)
Another year, another film about football, and the cult that is hooliganism.

This time, they have Stephen Graham in a del-boy jacket and cool moustache and a quite good soundtrack to try and sell the film. It all fails miserably.

It's the everyday story of a young lad who is bored with life, is at a football match and sees some violence and wants in, and starts to ignore his family in favour of the football (or rather the fighting).

it's your typically clichéd movie. and the one that stands out the most is the fact that the one who lets him into the group 'Elvis', is rejected by Carty halfway through.

In the films favour though, it's realistically filmed, Bell is very good in his role,and Stephen Graham may as well change his name to Robert Carlyle, as now he will always be remembered for his role in 'this is england' as Carlyle is for Trainspotting.

the story doesn't really go anywhere, we just see Carty sink deeper an deeper into the abyss, all the while not realising that Elvis is blatantly in love with him.

there really hasn't been a good 'Firm' movie since Clarks TV drama 'the firm', and this is just another nail in the football movie coffin.

give me when Saturday comes any-day
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21 of 26 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Homoerotic Football Thugs at Large, 15 Feb. 2010
By 
P. Frizelle (England) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Awaydays [DVD] (DVD)
Set against the Birkenhead docklands in 1979, Awaydays is the story of a group of disaffected young Merseysiders living in a working-class environment at the beginning of Margaret Thatcher's Prime Ministerial reign over Britain. The North of England in the late Seventies was, not a particularly nice place to be it was as an incredibly dark, violent place with the closure of indigenous industries, the rise of heroin and football violence. Liverpool Football team were supreme however and were riding the crest of a wave al over the UK and Europe, and there Legion of Fans followed, hence "Awaydays". The natural successors to the Mods who came before "The "Casuals" as they became known adopted the wearing of expensive European sports gear. Sports gear that they had stolen from all over Europe. The football hooligans here are represented in their regulation wedge haircuts, Peter Storm cagoules and Adidas Forest Hills attention to detail is very good and convincing. Awaydays also attempts to draw in cultural connections between music and football; both of which adhered to strict rituals, fashions and codes of behaviour. The football hooligans are represented in their regulation wedge haircuts, Peter Storm cagoules and Adidas Forest Hills attention to detail is very good and convincing. But the Music is Wrong, It's right for the City but wrong for the Hooligans. The film focuses on Post Punk Echo and the Bunnymen. Joy Divison. Gang of Four. This was the Music of the City, but the favoured Music of the hooligan was "Disco" and "Jazz Funk".

The core of the story concerns the relationship between art school student and emergent hooligan Carty a bright young man suffering from the recent loss of his mother and an adolescent disillusionment in urban life and Elvis, a charismatic if troubled member of The Pack. Both share a passion and love for all things post-punk.
Carty's wish to be accepted in society manifests itself with a yearning to be a part of a crew of football hooligans (The Pack). They're a bunch of guys of similar age to Carty, all kitted out in the same Adidas trainers and tracksuit tops and sporting wedge haircuts that make them appear more like bunch of petty pretty boys rather than hooligans. Eager to gain a place alongside The Pack on the terraces, Carty befriends Elvis (one of The Pack's front men) who lives alone in a house where all kinds of drink and drug debauchery takes place. Carty also adopts the same clothing in the hope of being noticed and asked to join the crew. But it's not as easy as that, The Pack are a hostile bunch and Carty has to prove his worth, before he can be classed as one of the boys. Tagging along with Elvis at an away game, Carty puts himself on the frontline and doesn't disappoint in showing his metal when The Pack take down a rival crew. Carty becomes the toast of the crew and is determined to take the bull by the horns and enjoy life, indulging in the rock and roll nature of his new lifestyle. But Carty's life of pleasure can't last for long and he soon begins to alienate both his family, and new friend Elvis, who grows jealous of Carty's popularity within The Pack and with the local girls. Relationships implode as Elvis starts to hate him self for his sexual deviations and the realisation he can never have his desire is seduced by the dark world of heroin. Carty's realises that life with the Pack isn't as sweet as it first seemed.

In Fact The whole of the Pack have this undercurrent of Homo attraction bromance thing going on. The intermittent scenes of violence are visceral and tough to watch in their own right, but at the same time they're not so horrific and explicit that they become unwatchable. Combining awayday punch-ups with bedsit brooding, the tortured relationship between the lads is generally lifeless. The film creates an atmosphere of sheer gloom and desperation as if a layer of dust and grime lies over the camera lens and the evocative sense of hoplessness of social mobility is overwhelming.

Better than you average hooligan Film
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8 of 10 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Joggers Not Runners, 24 Sept. 2009
By 
J. Buchanan - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Awaydays [DVD] (DVD)
If the late seventies into the early eighties were part of your (misspent) youth, then Awaydays will transport you right back there with its rites of passage tale set in 1979.

Carty (Nicky Bell) is tired of watching Tranmere Rovers in the company of his Dad and the other Steady-Eddies at Prenton Park, and decides that getting amongst the ranks of "The Pack" - a notorious hooligan element that follow Rovers home and away, will bring the necessary excitement to his life that he craves. At the same point, Elvis (brilliantly played by Liam Boyle) - a key member of "The Pack" is looking for a way out of his existence, and yearns for a more stable life than the mixed up world of drugs, violence, and loneliness he currently dwells in. Each wants what the other has, but both also have common ground by way of the team they support, and their love of the music and club scene that was on offer just over the water in Liverpool.

Awaydays takes you along on the journey that these two very different people embark on, as they attempt to find what they're looking for, and invariably both find that you should be careful what you wish for.

The film is set to a superb soundtrack of classic songs from the period (Echo And The Bunnymen, Joy Division, The Cure, Wire, and OMD to name check a few, and the opening sequence which is set to "Young Savage" by Ultravox! along with the one of the fight scenes set to the Magazine track "The Light Pours Out Of Me" are two of the high points of the film.
The is also a cameo appearance from Wirral band - The Rascals, who play the part of an embryonic Echo And The Bunnymen playing a gig in Eric's club on Mathew Street.

If you're looking for a stereotypical brain-in-neutral football hooligan film then you may well be disappointed, but if a story set to the background of your youth gets you interested then you're in for a treat.

Awaydays on DVD faithfully converts the story played out in the cult novel to the screen, and you could do a lot worse that getting hold of a copy of the soundtrack to go along with it.
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3.0 out of 5 stars NOT "THIS IS ENGLAND ", 1 Mar. 2013
By 
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This review is from: Awaydays [DVD] (DVD)
A tame but still a bit bloody version of engilsh football fights
a young man with anger issues needs a place to vent his anger
a gang of hooligans is just the place to pick on other team supporters
i'm not to sure what team they supported if any its just about the fight
the reason i bought this was a friend wanted it. he said it was ok to good hence three stars
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3.0 out of 5 stars No extra time needed, 11 April 2015
This review is from: Awaydays [DVD] (DVD)
Like so many films it's not a patch on the book,The book is amazing a very good read the hooligan element is secondary it's more about the music the fashion the need to be part of something,the main character is a very clever lad and is stuck in a dead end job so needs some excitement make "friends" at the match, It's a shame the film doesn't quite match the book
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Better films out there..., 22 Jun. 2014
This review is from: Awaydays (Amazon Instant Video)
Didn't do it for me this one, Story is very slow and not a great story either.. Give it a miss
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2.0 out of 5 stars pretty bland, 23 May 2012
By 
sean paul mccann "mccanns23" (ireland) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)   
This review is from: Awaydays [DVD] (DVD)
This film is set amongst working class footy hooliganism set in the late 70s but the film has a crafty eye for character building, trouble is that its all a bit boring. There are good scenes here but the plodding pace and poor me , poor me crys of desperation. Before long i was drifting in and out, not very good.
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3.0 out of 5 stars Brutal, 13 Mar. 2014
This review is from: Awaydays (Amazon Instant Video)
Football hooligan film. Nostalgic. Dark. Good soundtrack. Takes you back diesel trains and old-fashioned pubs. Violent. Worth a watch, but definitely a bloke's film.
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13 of 18 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Independent cinema at it's best!, 13 Aug. 2009
By 
R. Barter (London, England) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Awaydays [DVD] (DVD)
If you are expecting Awaydays to be nothing more than a footie violence film along the lines of Green Streets and Football Factory you're very wrong! This is a beautiful coming of age film about two young lads (Elvis & Carty), who, in 1979 NW England, find themselves members of "The Pack", a gang of football fans who follow their team across the country (hence the title Awaydays) to cause trouble and fight rival fans. A pure independant British film, a friend of mine put it perfectly when he said "Awaydays doesn't look like a no-budget film as much as it looks like it was actually made in 1979". The film makers have gone to every effort to make the set, costume, haircuts and even the shots and lighting of the film feel like something thats come right out of 1979 (just look at the soundtrack to confirm this!), and as a result Awaydays has achieved something special that it's fellow genre films dont even attempt let alone succeed in doing. There is sex and violence that will appeal to fans of Football Factory etc (it didn't get Nuts film of the week for nothing) but this is also a film that has a depth that any lover of cinema will appreciate. Destined to become a cult classic along with the book, this is possibly this is the first DVD that is a must have for both art students and football fans.
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