Customer Reviews


72 Reviews
5 star:
 (44)
4 star:
 (23)
3 star:
 (2)
2 star:
 (1)
1 star:
 (2)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


55 of 61 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Fantastic - but beware
I've loved Luc Besson's Nikita since the first time I saw it - even with the abysmal American dubbing. The second time I saw it, I was lucky, and caught the original language version - still visually stunning, but so much better without shonky dubbing.
The DVD is more of the same - Nikita is a beautiful film, absolutely fantastic. The storyline is well, there, and...
Published on 16 Dec 2003 by Lyle

versus
3.0 out of 5 stars Movie is ok but ...
Movie is ok, video and sound quality is good but extras department is lacking. There should be more but producers have been lazy.
Published 18 months ago by Sculder


‹ Previous | 1 28 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

55 of 61 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Fantastic - but beware, 16 Dec 2003
By 
This review is from: Nikita [DVD] [1990] (DVD)
I've loved Luc Besson's Nikita since the first time I saw it - even with the abysmal American dubbing. The second time I saw it, I was lucky, and caught the original language version - still visually stunning, but so much better without shonky dubbing.
The DVD is more of the same - Nikita is a beautiful film, absolutely fantastic. The storyline is well, there, and the rest of it is just pure entertainment.
But be warned, the DVD is the shonky dubbed version. It's still a good film - but try to keep an eye open for a subtitled one if possible.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Stylish, Sleek, Captivating, French Thriller., 17 Nov 2011
By 
Ryan S.Cord (United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Nikita [Blu-ray] (Blu-ray)
First time i saw this film on tv, many years ago it had me repeating scenes in my mind. So i watched it again and it still impresses me with it's style and flow. Screenplay is very well paced, like most of Besson's films and captures your attention so well. Many films today do not have that directorial talent to draw you into a film aswell as Besson does, and Nikita is no exeption despite it's age.
The action scenes flow so fluidly, mounting tension, with moving cameras and fantastic score, thanks to Eric Serra who scores most, if not all of Besson's films. Besson loves the style and power of guns and this film is a good example of that, although he knows when to stop and when to pick up the pace. In all his films though, the emotion of LOVE is always there to finally blossom in the later scenes. Nikita has all of this and is a stylish thriller that has inspired and copied, but never bettered. Just a shame he hasn't directed any more films like this, as opposed to the kids films he has directed recently. Nikita should be in everybody's dvd collection.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


17 of 19 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars I Love Only You, 15 Sep 2009
By 
fireblue (Sheffield, UK) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Nikita [Blu-ray] (Blu-ray)
This is my favourite film of all time from Luc Besson my favourite director.

Nikita is a bit of an accident waiting to happen. A drug addict she kills someone is a drug store raid gone wrong. This sets the tone of the first half of the film, gritty, harsh and full of polar extremes. It's difficult to to get attached to her character or feel anything for her. One minute she is falling in love and the next she is killing an embassador.

There's a great scene where Leon the 'cleaner' turns up and this is testemant to Bessons skill and he created a whole movie out of this 5 minute appearance.

A lot of people will be put off by the subtitles but worry not, this is a simple and energetic film with very little dialogue. Perhaps this is why I like it so much as Besson leaves you to fill in the blanks and portrays the film through emotion and action.

I won't spoil the ending but this is one of the very few films which makes me cry, such is the emotion as the film reaches its climax. Absolutely awesome, well worth a refresh on blu-ray, especially as the DVD version I had was pretty basic with just the movie on it.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Bourne before Bourne, 30 Dec 2011
By 
Michael Badu (London) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Nikita [DVD] (DVD)
I watched this film for the first time recently after having had it in my head since I saw the trailer when the film first came out about 20 years ago. I've seen the various tv dramas in the mean time, and I have to say that the original movie beats the tv versions any day of the week. The sequence where Nikita goes out for a birthday meal with her handler, only to receive a rather big (deliberately too big?) handgun as a gift; an event which presages the 'mission' that the 'night out' was actually the prelude too, is truly bravura in the truest sense of the word. The despair (childlike joy and excitement a split second earlier) on nikita's face as she first sees the gun and is given her orders; the images of the weapon in her delicate hands; the soundtrack; the brutality of the deed and the comedy of the 'kitchen scene', and the beauty of the ballsy efficiency of her subsequent escape. It's balletic. The sniper sequence from Venice is the other gem that makes the film; the tears as she lifts the automatic rifle from beneath the bath bubbles; visual poetry. The plot is a little strained by the standard of the current 'Bourne' films (the latest purveyor of that familiar combination of vulnerability and power in a central character) but this is really about the art of film, not storytelling. It makes you wonder about all the slightly unsatisfying films you've seen with perfect plots. Capturing the 'feeling' of a story is perhaps the most important thing. This is something that is done well in this film. Very stylish, very French, up their with the best thrillers of all time.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Visually exciting and thematically captivating film that blends action with drama., 20 Feb 2008
This review is from: Nikita [DVD] [1990] (DVD)
Nikita (Anne Parillaud) is a teenage delinquent, street punk and heroin abuser, who - as a means of securing another fix - participates in the robbery of a pharmacy owned by the parents of her fellow junkie friend. Unfortunately for them, the robbery goes horribly awry, degenerating into a gunfight with the local police, during which, her cohort is killed. Suffering from severe withdrawal symptoms, she shoots a police officer. Nikita is then arrested, tried, convicted of murder, and imprisoned for life, with parole considered after thirty years. In prison, she is drugged to simulate a death sentence; eventually waking up in an anonymous room, where a well-dressed hard man (Tchéky Karyo) enters and reveals to her that, although officially dead and buried after a suicide by overdose, she is, in actual fact, in the custody of the DGSE, the French intelligence agency. She is given a choice: work as a DGSE assassin or be killed. After some resistance, she chooses the former and proves a talented killer. One of her trainers, Amande (Jeanne Moreau), transforms her from grimy gutter trash into a stylish femme fatale.

La Femme Nikita, or "Nikita" as it is more commonly known (1990), was very much the prototype for director Luc Besson's subsequent film, the similarly stylish hit man-themed thriller Léon (1994); albeit, on a smaller scale and with a slightly more feminist edge. Here, alongside certain visual motifs and preoccupations with movement and rhythm, we can already see the thematic fascination with hit men, mob bosses, hotel room shoot-outs and the juxtaposition between femininity and a degree of required masculinity - as well as an early appearance from Besson regular Jean Reno as a character that very much prefigures the one that he would subsequently go on to portray - all taking shape as the foundation for something much more substantial. Not that La Femme Nikita is simply a mere experiment for that later work; on the contrary, this is possibly Besson's true birth as a filmmaker of real emotional depth, and the first of three flat-out masterpieces that he directed in the 1990's.

Previous Besson films, such as those tied fairly rigidly to the confines of the "cinema du look" movement - a brief cinematic resurgence in 1980's French cinema that saw a younger generation of filmmakers looking back to the days of Godard, Truffaut and the Nouvelle Vague, to create pop-culture referencing films dealing with doomed love and alienated Parisian youth - were high on style but low on plot. Take for example his first feature film, the wordless, black and white science fiction surrealist parable, Le Dernier Combat/The Last Battle (1983), which created an entirely authentic post-apocalyptic future world on an incredibly limited budget, but then fell back on having its lead actors, Jean Reno and former pop star Pierre Jolivet, do nothing for the remaining ninety minutes, other than attempt to outwit each other in a series of physical and mental tests. His second film, the much more colourful and lively Subway (1985) developed the visual ideas established in the first films of Jean Jacques Beineix and Leos Carax - alongside elements of action, comedy and revisionist film noir - though again, often at the substitution of routine plot and easily identifiable characters.

Both of those films are enjoyable, unique and eclectic in their own little way, but really, for me, fail to make an impact when compared to the sheer rush of pure adrenaline presented to us by La Femme Nikita. Nikita is not only a fascinating story about a woman coming to terms with the end of her life and she once knew it, but is also a perfectly rendered drama; dealing with the emotional and psychological implications created by her newly-acquired double life. Besson perfectly juxtaposes the sweet-natured and likeable Nikita and her relationship with the amiable Marco (Jean-Hughes Anglade), with the cold and calculating assassin who thinks nothing of executing her target for the exchange of cold hard cash. It's also an impressive action film; one that drips with the cool French chic of Subway or Le Grand Bleu (1988), creating an interesting and exotic approach to the scenes of violence and gunplay that would echo through to the subsequent Léon, as well as Besson's later science-fiction piece, The Fifth Element (1997).

Another interesting factor is the possible relationship between Nikita and Matilda from Léon, with the potential future scenario for Matilda echoing the present situation of Nikita here. I wouldn't necessarily recommend viewing this as a prequel in any sense of the word; however, it does present an interesting duality between the two films that is further suggested by the character of "the cleaner", here played effortlessly by the aforementioned Jean Reno. Ultimately though, La Femme Nikita is about pure entertainment; taking an interesting story, some fine performances and Besson's unique stylistic flair (especially when it comes to capturing scenes of blistering action) and blending them together to produce a film that delivers on all fronts. Unlike his earlier films, Le Dernier Combat, Subway and Le Grande Bleu, the excessive use of style and occasional stabs of humour are here applied to a rich and rewarding plot and a collection of characters that are interesting, intelligent and, above all else, believable! For me, La Femme Nikita was Besson's first truly great film, and one that still, to this day, could and should be evaluated alongside his other great works, specifically Léon, The Fifth Element and the recent Angel-A (2005).
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


12 of 14 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Luc Besson's masterpiece, 18 Sep 2003
This review is from: Nikita [DVD] [1990] (DVD)
There are films Noir, and there are thrillers. But Luc Besson gives us possibly the greatest film of all of these in "Nikita", the original film which later spawned a US clone titled "The Assassin", and a Canadian TV series.
Nikita, a drug-crazed killer off the streets, is sentenced to death for murder but wins a fatal reprieve - waking up after a supposedly lethal injection, and with the world believing in her demise, she is offered a choice: kill for her government or be killed in accordance with her sentence. This film follows her life as an assassin as she struggles to stay alive, but will her humanity - and her sanity - last that long?
This film is a true classic, possibly one of the greatest films of all time, which is a rare accolade for a non-US production. Besson's cinematography is at its peak here and he brings out the dark, wet, dirty streets of Paris to great effect, as well as creating the claustrophobic interior's of the section's training facility and cells. Combat is fierce and realistic, and may not be very suitable for younger viewers. The "18" rating is there for a good reason.
Any person considering themselves a true expert of cinema or anybody who wants to own the best there is should get a copy of this film as soon as possible. As far as I am concerned, this film ranks alongside "Seven Samurai" as one of the best non-US productions ever made, and should definitely be in the top 100 films of all time. Buy it.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


16 of 19 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The original and still the best, 27 Jun 2006
This review is from: Nikita [DVD] [1990] (DVD)
A gritty, violent but also romantic and very sexy film. Luc Besson's work is brilliant and been copied a number of times (Black cat, the assasin, La Femme Nikita TV Series) but this is head shoulders above those. Anne Parillaud is sizzling as the title character while the supporting cast is great, Jean Reno, Tceky Karyo, Jeanne Moreau all give stellar performances. Besson's direction and writing is first class, especially the action scenes while the romantic storylines bring the film to another level. Definately worth the money unlike the many remakes (especially the assassin which is nearly scene for scene)
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


25 of 30 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Fantastic, 30 Jan 2001
By A Customer
This review is from: Nikita [VHS] [1990] (VHS Tape)
This film certainly gives subtitled films a good rep. I remember watching this film on TV a few years back and it has stuck in my mind ever since. The plotline is so fascinating and it keeps hold of you the whole way through. The acting from all cast members is outstanding. Hollywood tried doing a copy of it with 'Assassin' and totally destroyed it. V. good film, watch it
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Only the French......., 20 Nov 2009
This review is from: Nikita [DVD] [1990] (DVD)
Only the French could invent a heroine like Nikita, tragic, mad, dangerous but ultimately vunerable. Watch this film, the scene where she is walking home from her 'date' with the rain pouring down, her stockings shredded and mascara streaming down her face. If this was Hollywood, she would have a slightly torn dress and a tiny cut over one eye.

A shocking film but a must see. One of my favourites but only watch it with subtitles, not the dubbed version.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great classic, 8 Mar 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Nikita [DVD] (DVD)
The film was another gripping production of Luc Besson,and fabulous performance by Anne Parillaud. Way better than the US version which followed. Great photography and film score. It does help to watch the French version as parts get lost in translation.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 28 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

Nikita [Blu-ray]
Nikita [Blu-ray] by Luc Besson (Blu-ray - 2009)
£7.15
In stock
Add to basket Add to wishlist
Only search this product's reviews