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14 of 14 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The colour of our planet from far far away...
It's been three years since Regina's last album, "Begin to Hope", was released, and her new album has finally arrived...

The album's lead single "Laughing With" was, I think, an excellent choice for first single. It's delicate, soft and very pretty. "Eet" also shows that same side of Miss Spektor.

"Machine" sounds like what I imagine Regina would...
Published on 23 Jun. 2009 by Mr. Cm Mcclelland

versus
2 of 28 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Makes Bjork sound sensible
What are you lot thinking? 5 stars? At a stretch, there might be two songs on here. the rest of the album is like listening to somebody sitting at a piano and making up stuff as they go along... - Oh, I'm sorry, apparently it's SUPPOSED to sound like somebody sitting at a piano and making up stuff as they go along.
I'm 50 this year and I've been buying music since I...
Published on 16 Aug. 2010 by The Com


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14 of 14 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The colour of our planet from far far away..., 23 Jun. 2009
By 
This review is from: Far (Audio CD)
It's been three years since Regina's last album, "Begin to Hope", was released, and her new album has finally arrived...

The album's lead single "Laughing With" was, I think, an excellent choice for first single. It's delicate, soft and very pretty. "Eet" also shows that same side of Miss Spektor.

"Machine" sounds like what I imagine Regina would have made if she had a top-notch producer at the time of recording her 2002 album "Songs". "Genius Next Door" and "Man of a thousand faces" are other songs that have a darker sound than the others.

"Blue Lips" is a bit different. It's a ballad with an epic, sweeping sound thanks to the very good production by Jeff Lynne (who has produced for artists such as The Beatles and Roy Orbison).

"Human of the Year" is a very nice track with a "church-gospelly" kind of sound that works nicely for Regina's voice and piano. Go to 2:17 in the track to hear how beautiful Regina's voice can really sound (it actually gave me goosebumps).

Fans of Regina's quirky, upbeat songs can't be dissappointed with this album. "The Calculation", "Folding Chair", and "Dance Anthem of the 80's" are possibly Regina's most catchy and fun songs to date. "The Calculation" is very radio friendly to be honest but Regina's piano and beautiful vocal styling and quirky lyrics just make it impossible not to like. "Folding Chair" is really fun and sweet; a very feel-good song that brings a smile to my face each time I hear it. "Dance Anthem of the 80's" starts out with familiar Regina territory, but the song develops and has a circusey, slightly eerie, sound with beatboxing to add more effect to it; a nice surprise...

Fans of Regina's early work might be worried that this album might be too overproduced and radio-friendly with the new producers; Jeff Lynne (The Beatles, Roy Orbison), Garret "Jacknife" Lee (R.E.M., U2, Snow Patrol, Bloc Party, The Hives, Weezer), Mike Elizondo (Dr. Dre, Eminem, Fiona Apple). Yes, the album has a lot of extra production but it compliments Regina's personality perfectly and really adds to the songs. Regina's piano and vocals are up in the forefront where they should be.

The special edition of the album comes with a DVD of four music videos and two extra tracks "Time is all around" and "The Sword & The Pen" so I'd suggest paying a few more pounds to get it instead of the standard edition.

Regina has definitely matured over the last three years. Her voice is clearer, prettier, and she really SINGS her heart out on this album. Overall, I'd say this is a beautiful, emotional album that should please Regina Spektor fans. I'd be surprised if it didn't.

I'm really hoping her label promote her well; she deserves more attention than she gets.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Human of the year? Not quite, but definitely a contender..., 6 Nov. 2009
By 
Andy Sweeney "music was my first love" (Brighton, East Sussex) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (TOP 100 REVIEWER)   
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Far (Audio CD)
I love this album. OK, I admit it, that isn't the most impartial way to start off a review, but it's the truth. I love everything about it, the interesting, witty lyrics, Regina's gorgeous vocals, the superb songwriting, the way some of the compositions have a powerful emotive message and yet still have the ability to make a smile involuntarily creep across your face. Such is the appeal of "Far", I have literally lost count of the amount of times I have played this album since I've bought it, so not only does this album have an immediate impact on the listener, it has real longevity.

There are so many brilliant songs on this collection, I could quite easily go through each track and would probably run out of superlatives, so I'll just stick to my absolute favourites. The bouncy opener, "The Calculation" is infectious and charming. "Eet" is both delicate and then magnificent, reminding me a little of Ben Folds, as does the excellent "Two Birds". The sinister, near-Orwelian, "Machine" is another stand-out, managing to be both chilling and yet undeniably beautiful. I'm reminded of Alanis Morissette at her most poignant best when I hear "Laughing With", a song wryly commenting about the perversion and misuse of religion whilst managing to stay cleverly neutral. "Dance Anthem Of The 80's" is almost annoyingly catchy but most certainly amusing. "Wallet" is a beautiful song, describing the brief insight into someone's life finding their wallet would give you. In fact, every single track on "Far" has something special to offer to the listener.

It's a testament to the album's four producers that you can't tell that the songs have different people behind the helm - it's a very cohesive album and they all simply seem to bring the best out of Ms. Spektor. Even the great but often-criticised Jeff Lynne, who isn't renowned for his production subtlety, tailors his sound and the instrumentation to enrich and enhance the performance rather than to leave any trademark stamp on it. In fact, even the keenest ears would have trouble picking out which producer was behind which track. That, I believe, is a huge compliment to all involved in this record. What's more, I've managed to get to the end of a review about a Regina Spektor album without using the word "quirky". Until now. Damn.

A wonderful, wonderful album.
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14 of 15 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The colour of our planet from far far away..., 23 Jun. 2009
By 
This review is from: Far (Special Edition) (Audio CD)
It's been three years since Regina's last album, "Begin to Hope", was released, and her new album has finally arrived...

The album's lead single "Laughing With" was, I think, an excellent choice for first single. It's delicate, soft and very pretty. "Eet" also shows that same side of Miss Spektor.

"Machine" sounds like what I imagine Regina would have made if she had a top-notch producer at the time of recording her 2002 album "Songs". "Genius Next Door" and "Man of a thousand faces" are other songs that have a darker sound than the others.

"Blue Lips" is a bit different. It's a ballad with an epic, sweeping sound thanks to the very good production by Jeff Lynne (who has produced for artists such as The Beatles and Roy Orbison).

"Human of the Year" is a very nice track with a "church-gospelly" kind of sound that works nicely for Regina's voice and piano. Go to 2:17 in the track to hear how beautiful Regina's voice can really sound (it actually gave me goosebumps).

Fans of Regina's quirky, upbeat songs can't be dissappointed with this album. "The Calculation", "Folding Chair", and "Dance Anthem of the 80's" are possibly Regina's most catchy and fun songs to date. "The Calculation" is very radio friendly to be honest but Regina's piano and beautiful vocal styling and quirky lyrics just make it impossible not to like. "Folding Chair" is really fun and sweet; a very feel-good song that brings a smile to my face each time I hear it. "Dance Anthem of the 80's" starts out with familiar Regina territory, but the song develops and has a circusey, slightly eerie, sound with beatboxing to add more effect to it; a nice surprise...

Fans of Regina's early work might be worried that this album might be too overproduced and radio-friendly with the new producers; Jeff Lynne (The Beatles, Roy Orbison), Garret "Jacknife" Lee (R.E.M., U2, Snow Patrol, Bloc Party, The Hives, Weezer), Mike Elizondo (Dr. Dre, Eminem, Fiona Apple). Yes, the album has a lot of extra production but it compliments Regina's personality perfectly and really adds to the songs. Regina's piano and vocals are up in the forefront where they should be.

The special edition of the album comes with a DVD of four music videos and two extra tracks "Time is all around" and "The Sword & The Pen" so I'd suggest paying a few more pounds to get it instead of the standard edition.
Regina has definitely matured over the last three years. Her voice is clearer, prettier, and she really SINGS her heart out on this album. Overall, I'd say this is a beautiful, emotional album that should please Regina Spektor fans. I'd be surprised if it didn't.

I'm really hoping her label promote her well; she deserves more attention than she gets.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Kooky that I can stomach, 29 July 2009
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Far (Special Edition) (Audio CD)
Quietly in the distance I thought I heard Robbie Williams' "Rock DJ" intro start on the radio. Then a woman started singing and the song didn't turn into a full on pop song. I suspected it might be Regina Spektor. I was right as it was "The Calculation" from her new album. I had heard a few of her songs in the past and I loathed her. Not merely disliked, but seriously hated her music. So I was very surprised that I liked her new single.

For reasons of perverse masochism I decided to buy her album. I was expecting to like two or three songs while hating the rest. I was more than a little surprised that I loved it. It's a monster of an album. By far and away the best new release I've heard so far in 2009. And her voice is not annoying.

1. "The Calculation" - 3:13 (4 out of 5 stars)
Good, joyful, funny, bouncy, up-beat pop song. It has no similarities to "Rock DJ" now that I've heard it properly.

2. "Eet" - 3:54 (4 stars)
Good up-tempo track. Of no great merit but nothing wrong with it.

3. "Blue Lips" - 3:34 (3 stars)
Starts as a slow song but picks up the pace for most of the second half. It's good.

4. "Folding Chair" - 3:35 (4 stars)
A real nice feel good song. She makes bizarre dolphin sounds but it's not anywhere near as daft or as kooky as it could be - it works as well as can be expected as it fits the song seamlessly.

5. "Machine" - 3:51 (3 stars)
Loud and fairly heavy. Feels like a minor track but very enjoyable with some interesting lyrics about our place in the past, present and future.

6. "Laughing With" - 3:18 (4 stars)
I got a tingle up my spine despite the silly lyrics. Her performance sells the words. I like the song maybe more than I should.

7. "Human of the Year" - 4:12 (2 stars)
This slower, more ponderous track does nothing for me.

8. "Two Birds" - 3:23 (4 stars)
Sounds like a children's song with bright up-beat music. Borderline brilliant.

9. "Dance Anthem of the 80's" - 3:44 (5 stars)
Brilliant song about boys and girls watching each other and wanting more. The highlight of the album.

10. "Genius Next Door" - 5:10 (3 stars)
Lyrics are a bit silly and the music is sadder and slower. I didn't care for it to begin with, but it gets better as it progresses. Nice echo on her voice at some points. Feels like a key album track. The story reminds me of the Disney cartoon version of Winnie The Poo.

11. "Wallet" - 2:30 (4 stars)
Kooky song about finding a wallet and looking through it to get an idea of who the owner is. Feels like a scene from a quirky indie film such as Me And You And Everyone We Know or Eagle Vs. Shark. Not a great song but very charming and sweet. I can easily imagine some people hating it.

12. "One More Time with Feeling" - 4:03 (3 stars)
Good song with interesting lyrics.

13. "Man of a Thousand Faces" - 3:12 (3 stars)
Okay song with a darker, heavier piano sound but slightly weaker than most of what's gone before. Has a bit of a non-ending which is a shame as it's the climax of the whole album.

The 47 minute album might be too perky for some but I really, seriously, unapologetically like it. And it's very rare for me to like eccentric kooky music. Her music exists in its own little world much like the two movies I mentioned earlier (and the more male-centric films of Wes Anderson). I guess you either love it or hate it.

The CD seems to have been better mastered than most new releases. I'm pretty certain I could hear proper dynamics between the loud and quiet sections which is rare with modern CDs. Oddly the booklet says "Lyrics Reprinted by Permission" but there are no lyrics in the booklet.

I like to make EP playlists out of albums on my iPod. Tracks 1, 4, 8 and 9 made the cut.

I didn't buy the two disc deluxe edition. I don't regret it as the two extra songs seem very much like off-cuts (I've heard them on Spotify) and I have no interest in her music videos.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Possibly the best album by anyone, ever., 14 Jan. 2010
By 
This review is from: Far (Audio CD)
If you're familiar with "Samson", probably Regina's most famous song so far, well, this album contains 13 songs that are at least as good, and some of them are better.

Any review is of course subjective, but among female singer-songwriters, Regina is a colossus, and this album is by far her best (no pun intended). Why? For a start all 13 songs are brilliant, and totally original, and not one sounds remotely like any other. The pace varies from offbeat, uplifting ballads (Laughing With, The Man with 1000 Faces) to Dance Anthem of the 80s which is very difficult to not get up and dance to. Some are beautifully melancholy, others delightfully odd (at one point on 'Folding Chair' she briefly sounds like Bill Oddie doing 'Funky Gibbon'). She also plays with expectations by wedding sad themes to jolly melodies: "One More Time With Feeling" sounds like a singalong but in fact is an entreaty to a terminally ill loved one. Amazingly, even this song, perhaps the saddest here, succeeds in creating a warm feeling inside.

Every song tells a story, too. A lonely woman tries to reunite a lost wallet with its owner, a reluctant hero is forced to come forward to accept an award, and a shy clever man strives to understand a strange event in a country village. Many of the songs leave powerful images in your mind as well.

It's only fair to warn you though, by the second or third listening you're likely to be addicted, and playing this album again and again, neglecting everything else in your music collection for several months, and possibly getting death threats if you have housemates or spouses with less refined music tastes!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Far - a long wait, a triumphant return, 8 July 2009
By 
I. Curry "IDC" (London, UK) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Far (Special Edition) (Audio CD)
Regina Spektor is one of my favourite singer songwriters, and I've been looking forward to this new album for a while. It has been three years since Begin to Hope, and, since then, Spektor has moved further away from the quirkiest extreme of her anti-folk leanings into something more commercially palatable. But would opening this music out to a wider audience kill the very innocence, charm and uniqueness that has maintained a legion of devoted fans?

On first listen I was a little crushed to suspect that it might have. The songs seemed friendly enough, a little insipid and not particularly memorable. I was inclined to give it a disappointed 3 stars. But it soon became apparent that this album was a gem that just needed a little attention, a little polishing through listening to become a shining and beautiful addition to my collection - certainly worth four stars. It is a grower of an album, and, after a short while, a whole clutch of songs will have bored their way into your mind, catchy choruses and soulful verses that replay in your mind before you go to sleep, and demand playing as soon as you wake up. By this point I had decided to award a rare (for me) five stars.

In fact, this is an example of that most rare and exciting of musical experiences when you fall in love with an album, when it captures your imagination and passion and becomes the must-hear thing, the soundtrack to your day and is then inexorably and indelibly linked with the whole period of time for which it is the favourite record.

Spektor's piano compositions have always amazed me, but this is the first album when I've properly considered how beautiful her voice can be. She really does blast out in some of the songs, holding perfect, melodic notes and enchanting . The compositions and arrangements are also noteworthy - cellos in Laughing With, a pair of Oboes in Two Birds, tambourine in Blue Lips, drumming (that is never overly intrusive) combine with the ubiquitous, delicious piano to produce memorable soundscapes. There is more production, yes, but this time these values seem to add to Spektor's music rather than threatening to overshadow it.

Spektor is a polarising artist; people seem to either love her imaginative, quirky and sometimes downright bizarre music or hate it for being saccharine and weird. I have always loved the strange world view Spektor brings, lyrical stories that unfold over crashing piano and strained strings. Spektor has not lost her ability to compose catchy tunes, but this catchiness is not at the expense of a complex arrangement that, for me, retains interest in the songs long after any novelty has worn off. And in a world that can seem far too serious, escaping into Spektor's world, where we can laugh at god's sense of humour, sing along with the dolphins and meditate on blue being the most human of colours, is no bad thing.

In summary, this album is a grower, but one that from mean shoots develops into a beautiful flower. I think it will appeal to existing fans and new listeners alike - although Spektor's appeal will always be somewhat limited given the Marmite effect she has. It may be a turnoff for those longstanding anti-folk music fans who thought that Begin to Hope was far too commercial - I imagine this record already has the advertisers and TV execs waiting to make it the soundtrack for summer. But, for the rest of us this is another chance to enjoy 47 minutes 39 seconds in the company of one of the most imaginative, technically expert and melodic composers around today.

Track listings:

The Calculation - Spektor opens with a bouncy, up tempo number which has the familiar elements of a bizarre lyrical story (a couple pulling out their own hearts to make them come alive, making a computer out of macaroni pieces). In sound it is somewhere between On The Radio and Hotel Song but with the slicker production that is a hallmark of this album. It is super catchy, the only song from the album which I immediately loved.

Eet - given the chorus features only the word 'eet' you might think that this is a song on the more ridiculous end of Regina's already bizarre-tilting spectrum. But instead this is one of the more soulful, melancholic pieces, delivered with the slicker production and faster beats that have been noted, but still provoking an emotional connection. This is the first of alternating pairings which see comic songs placed next to more emotional reflections (such as with Blue Lips/Folding Chair).

Blue lips - probably my favourite song on the album (at the moment, at least!) this song combines the rhythmic verses with a strangely haunting and captivating chorus ("blue lips, blue veins, blue the colour of our planet from far, far away").

Folding Chair - Spektor descends back into silliness with a delightfully upbeat song featuring her imitating dolphins (which sound more like seals) singing the chorus. I thought this might get a little twee and annoying after a while, but it still brings a smile to my face along with her observation that her body is perfect because she has eyelashes that capture her sweat.

Machine - darker again, with a catchy, hooked into the machine chorus and staccato vocals to evoke a robotic existence at some point in what seems a darker, oppressive future. Not my favourite track, but perfectly listenable.

Laughing With - this was the lead track from the album, and it is easy to see why it was chosen. It is a evocative mix of minor keys and a rumination on the comic quality of god's cosmic plan, moving from the emotionally wrenching situations where god is very serious to the everyday comic situations that Regina's god seems to allow. It is beautifully composed, and affecting, even if it does sound more than a little like a Joan Osborne tune. This song produces some of Spektor's most arresting observations, that "No one laughs at God on the day they realize that the last sight they'll ever see is a pair of hateful eyes", or that "no ones laughing at God when its got really late and their kids not back from that party yet" - that last one in particular sending a fearful shiver down my body.

Human of the Year - this is a big, soaring, gothic song that posits that there is a Human of the Year award. It isn't entirely clear that this is an award anyone would want to win! A strangely dark tale unfolds, in the best tradition of Mary Ann Meets the Gravediggers

Two Birds - one of the best songs on the album, an upbeat romp that elicits thoughts ranging from birds to two friends or brothers that can't decide whether to leave their home towns, with a delightful comic edge provided by the trumps of a pair of oboes and a racy chorus.

Dance Anthem of the 80s - pop beats on Regina's necessarily odd take on a dance anthem. Perfectly poppy, catchy and listenable.

Genius Next Door - by far the longest song on the album, weighing in over 5 minutes. A flowing, low-key with the memorable lyrics that the "lake had turned as thick as butter".

Wallet - Regina's ability to make a song out of the most minor seeming events is brought out in this tune considering how someone would feel if a lost wallet was returned.

One More Time With Feeling - not as memorable as some of the others on the album, and struggling to get my attention being placed so late on the album! Perfectly listenable, but nothing special.

Man of A Thousand Faces - the album finishes on a high with a delicious, whimsical track that rounds off the CD nicely. A wispy, repeated rift punctuated with heavier chords that build into a big vocal key change half way through.
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14 of 16 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Far Out Ms Spektor, 22 Jun. 2009
By 
The Wolf (uk) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (TOP 100 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: Far (Audio CD)
Anyone who appreciates good songwriting will find much
to enjoy in Ms Spektor's splendid new album 'Far'.

The thirteen tracks in this collection build admirably
on the foundations of her past work ( I retain enormous
affection for her 2006 release 'Begin To Hope' ).

Despite creative input from four different producers the
recording and general ambience is remarkably coherent.
( Even Mr Lynne manages to keep his tendency towards
excess in check ).

The relatively simple instrumental format lets the songs
speak for themselves. Unpredictable in construction and
delightfully quirky in delivery.

Ms Spektor has a charming voice. Fragile, tentative at times
( in a beguiling way ) and entirely suited to her material.
Comparisons will doubtless follow from
those more knowledgable than myself.
I am more entranced by what makes her different to other
performers than by what might make her, in some ways, similar.

There are many treasures to be found here.
Notably the enigmatic and strangely moving 'Eet'.
A strong, simple and affecting melody and powerful chorus
driven along by echoing piano and solid four-square percussion.
(The emphasis on all those little "t"s made me smile).

'Laughing With' is another musical and lyrical highlight.
An argument neither for nor against god in spiritually starved times.

'Dance Anthem Of The 80's' is bonkers in the nicest possible way.
I tried to dance along but got my paws crossed and embarrassed
myself in front of Mrs Wolf and The Cubs.
An Old Wolf should know better !

'Wallet' captures a strangely random event with extraordinary pathos.

Likewise 'One More Time With Feeling' which conveys the experience of
an intensely personal moment in a surreal, quasi-vaudevillian manner.

Final track 'Man Of A Thousand Faces' winds up the project on
an unresolved and melancholy note. A musical question mark.

Heck ! There is really not very much not to like here.
In its own quiet way Ms Spektor has delivered a small gem of an album.

Highly Recommended.
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5.0 out of 5 stars In our minds until forever, 18 Mar. 2010
By 
E. A Solinas "ea_solinas" (MD USA) - See all my reviews
(HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)    (TOP 500 REVIEWER)    (REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Far (Audio CD)
I have to hand it to Regina Spektor -- she actually has managed to refine and further her unique anti-folk/pop sound, but also keep the unique qualities of her older style. Her third studio album "Far" is all about this -- lots of multifaceted, fluid expanses of piano, weird little songs about computers made of macaroni, and a quirky little voice. It's a more polished piece of work, but still has the twists and edges to keep it interesting.

"We sat there looking at the faces/Of these stranges in the pages/'Til we knew 'em mathematically," Spektor says over a powerful, bouncing piano melody. She sings of creating pasta computers that "counted up our feelings/And divided them up even/And it called that calculation perfect love" and cutting out their own little pebble-hearts that they "struck 'em so hard/So hard/Until they sparked."

Well, it's nice to see that she isn't writing your average MTV goopy love-ballad about kissing.

It's followed up by a wistful little ballad with a title like a hiccup ("Eeeee-eeeeee-eeeeet!") , a horn-and-synth-riddled pop melody that bounces and swirls alternately, a stompy piano-rockers, mellow slower songs, soaring ballads about the ultimate prize ("Human, human of the year, you are"), a dance song or two, sprightly sunny pop melodies, a pair of rambling anti-folky songs.

It's nice to see that greater exposure hasn't taken away the weird from Regina Spektor's work. Rather than your usual silly love songs and personal laments, she tackles the loss of familiar things, God's sense of humor, a society full of chipper automatons ("They started out beneath the knowledge tree/Then they chopped it down to make white picket fences") and a 1984-esque story about being "hooked into machine." When it's not bizarre, she inserts little quirks and strange images that stick in your mind ("Blue lips, blue veins/The color of our planet from far away").

She also has become more polished musically, with everything a bit smoother and nimbler than before. Her piano is still the centerpiece -- it jabs, flows, bounces, ripples and elegantly twists -- and it's accompanied by the occasional swirl of synth, some horns, and plenty of subtle drumming. Listen carefully and you can hear a bit of violin in songs like "Laughing With," and some tambourine in "Blue Lips," just enough to flavor their sounds.

The song that doesn't fit in is "Dance Anthem of the 80s," which sounds like a token dance song, which tries to fuse anti-pop and dance. It doesn't quite work. The jabby jangling "Machine" (with its eerie synth and jingling chains) doesn't entirely fit either, but taken alone it's a brutally memorable song.

Well, enough of that. Spektor's slightly creaky vocals weave easily between clear high sweetness and quirky murmurs, and she's got a special knack for evoking a slightly magical, bittersweet worldview -- genies, a genial deity, love games, balloons, a lake that turns "thick as butter," and rainy streets. Lots of delightfully odd phrases ("and the pride inside their eyes/is synchronised to a love you'll never know") and images (sparks flying from a pair of pebble-hearts).

Despite a couple of ill-fitting songs (one awkward and one awesome), Regina Spektor's "Far" is a solid follow-up to her anti-folk and anti-pop tunes of the past.
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5.0 out of 5 stars What's not to love?, 2 July 2009
By 
Holly Ford - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Far (Special Edition) (Audio CD)
Ahh, Regina. I adore her, I really do. She's just tiny, cute little ball of fluff, but with a sharp wit and immense musical talent to go with it. I was lucky enough to see her live on 29th June, and she was just beyond incredible. I wanted to go and see her again the minute the concert ended, and couldn't stop thinking about it for days.
Anyway, back to Far. What can I say, this is one hell of an album. Not to everyone's taste, but if you like your music original, intelligent and fun, then you're bound to love this. When I first heard it I was slightly disappointed though, I have to admit. I just thought it sounded a bit too glossy and over-produced. However, whilst I still do slightly prefer her Soviet Kitsch days, this album is a perfect chance for Regina to show the world that behind all the chair banging and silly lyrics, she has one of the most amazing voices I've ever heard, which was entirely reflected when I saw her live.
Standout tracks for me, although there's honestly not one song I dislike, are Human Of The Year, Genuis Next Door, Eet, Machine and Blue Lips. Each are classic examples of how Regina's music can be enjoyed on different levels: as background music, as a pretty melody, a catchy song, or read deeper into, understanding the deeper meanings in all her songs. For this exact reason it's hard to ever imagine getting bored of this, and I haven't stopped playing it since I bought it.
Just incredible. I can't write anything that would do this album justice, it's just incredible. If you ever get the chance to see Regina live, for Pete's sake do, you won't regret it!
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5.0 out of 5 stars A WORK OF ART, 4 July 2009
By 
B. A. Woolhouse (Leeds, West Yorkshire United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Far (Special Edition) (Audio CD)
Ok i admit i am a Jeff Lynne addict and that is why i perchased the album. I could and probably would have totally ignored this masterpiece if i had'nt found out that JL had produced a few songs which has not destracted me from this talented purist.
Like myself i think its about time we woke up and celebrate a master musician, vocalist and composer. Composer being the right word. Yes it is a production compilation of which all have done themselves proud and let Regina's innovations and vocals shine through.
Every song on the album are works of art dare i say musical masterpieces. Shear perfection. Each having a contrasting range of melodies with their own special sense of mortality. Some are delicate `Laughing with', intrigueing and haunting `Genius Next Door'& `Man of a Thousand Faces', joyfull `One More Time with Feeling', agressive `Machine', upbeat `Dance Athem of the 80's'& `Two Birds', commercial `The Calculation', bizarre `Human of the Year',sophisicated and de-stressing `The Sword and the Pen'& `Time is All Around', cute `Folding Chair', Alzheimatic `EET', beautiful with self-belief `Blue Lips', warm hearted `Wallet'.
Not experiencing or having the pleasure of hearing her previous recordings. I will take on board all the comments i have read and believe they have to be respected nad investigated into in the very near future. In the meantime i will live `FAR' away in Reginas ecstatic world of total brilliance.
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Far (Special Edition)
Far (Special Edition) by Regina Spektor (Audio CD - 2009)
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