Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop All Amazon Fashion Up to 70% off Fashion Cloud Drive Photos Shop now Shop Amazon Fire TV Shop now Shop Fire HD 6 Learn More Shop now Shop now Shop now

Customer Reviews

15
4.5 out of 5 stars
Until The Earth Begins To Part
Format: MP3 DownloadChange
Price:£1.98
Your rating(Clear)Rate this item


There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later.

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
Label 4AD are creating quite a stable of fine new talent.

Edinburgh-based band Broken Records have been compared with
Arcade Fire and one can understand why this might be so.
(The Waterboys came to mind for me from time to time).
They have none-the-less a highly distinctive
and persuasive sound all their own.

The unorthodox instrumental line-up includes violin, cello,
trumpet and accordian which when combined with guitar, piano,
bass and drums makes for a rich and diverse sound tapestry.

The album has not been overproduced by Mr Caple and the band.
There is a raw edge to the finished article which conveys an
almost 'live' feel to the proceedings.

Mr Sutherland's voice is a bit rough around the edges too
but this does not prevent him from bringing the music's
inherent emotionality to the surface.
He is at his best in the very beautiful 'A Promise' whose gentle
introduction builds by degrees to become an rousing anthem.

Opening track 'Nearly Home' takes time to establish its principal
musical idea. The drone of the introduction gives way to a
scintillating string ostinato and strident march supporting
Mr Sutherland's plaintively wailing falsetto.
A complex and highly erudite composition.

'Wolves', as you might well understand, is a particularly
interesting song for me (the pack referred to are distant cousins).
The piano/voice opening gives way to yet another martial tutti.
It is a formula which serves them well.

'Ghosts' is the fragile highpoint of the project.
A lilting air with an affecting central vocal performance.

The band's folk roots are no more obvious than on 'A Good Reason',
a ribald and rumbustious number full of gypsy-like energy.

The dramatic closure provided by 'Slow Parade' brought Mr Bowie's
'Rock 'n' Roll Suicide' to mind. A magnificent conclusion.

'Until The Earth Begins To Part' is a powerfully convincing
debut from a fine new band. The future looks bright for them.

Recommended.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 9 July 2009
This is an awesome album for those who enjoy something a little different from the run-of-the-mill indi sounds that we are spoon fed through the mass media.

I'm not big into all guitar based music that's currently in the charts past or present. Neither am I some sort of hardcore critic of music who can pull a whole stack of band names out of the hat that might make you think I know what I'm on about when it comes to songs.

I've heard Broken Records live many times, and somehow no matter when or where they play, hearing their music just seems to make everything else seem rosy.

This album has some slow stuff which I've only heard them play once live, so it's still quite new to me. On an album like this it makes sense. There's a journey to be had through the songs.

But always the highlight are the legendary fast tunes that anyone would be troubled if they don't at least tap their toes along to.

It all has a great Scottish vibe to it, but it also is nothing like the tunes I used to hear when my parents dragged me as a child to beard-ridden fiddle and guitar festivals. It's modern and refreshing, but comforting and welcoming at the same time.

Any music that is good enough to become the soundtrack of the summer deserves great praise. I'm sure that I'll be remembering the Summer of 2009 every time I hear this album in the future.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 5 November 2012
Not only Broken Records is my favorite modern band by far, with an album like Until The Earth Begins To Part, they definitely play with the great ones. This vinyl edition is amazing, and the music is hauntingly beautiful. Definetly a must have.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 20 June 2009
I had heard of comparisons to Arcade Fire but the string arrangements remind me more of Devotchka. But sung with a Scottish accent! I suspect that this might get to 5 stars over time but I'm wrestling with its strangeness for now!
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
on 2 July 2009
This is a remarkably fine effort for a first album. The songs display true originality with thought provoking lyrics and a commendable variety of styles which combine into a coherent set. This band of clearly talented multi instrumentalists deserve a great deal of success. The experience of enjoying the album is enhanced by the fact that even after several repeat listenings, there are still new subtleties to be discovered. Particular praise should go to the drummer, Andrew Keeney whose solid yet sensitive performances are a great asset to the band.
Highly recommended for those seeking a refreshingly original album.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
on 29 May 2009
Having teased us for too long with a series of lovely limited edition 7" singles, with a rush and a push Edinburgh's Broken records finally release their astounding debut album for the beguilingly hip record label 4AD, home of all your favourite bands.

'Until The Earth Begins To Part' is a record very much of the moment, but also one step removed. Yes,in the wonderful array of instrumentation on display there are distant echoes of the achingly current, such as Beirut and Arcade Fire, but this album resonates far more deeply. A series of Springsteenesque narratives are backed by a whirling eclectic mix of organ, strings and horns, the melodramatic swoop of God Speed You Black Emperor! having a wee birl with the Celtic soul vision of The Waterboys.

Simply irresistible - this is the Sound of Young Scotland - file under 'Your New Favourite Record'!!!
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
on 1 June 2009
Finally an album by one of my favourite live bands! Living in Edinburgh, I've had a chance to see these guys a number of times, and they just get better and better. Forget the pat comparisons to the Arcade Fire and Beirut, as they really don't do these songs justice. Like the aforementioned bands, they use a number of different instruments and don't just rely on guitars, which is always a good thing. However, there's just as much of the Waterboys' celtic rock going on here, as well as some lovely post-rock influences. There's a wonderful mix of raw emotion and self-confident swagger to this album, which does a great job of capturing the excitement of the band's live shows. From the great recent single "Until the Earth Begins to Part", to the rousing yet aching slow-burn of "The Slow Parade", this album is a gem and perfectly justifies all the hype!
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
For this reviewer , Edinburgh's Broken Records have proved to be as elusive as an honest M.P. .I have heard their name intermittently over the last couple of years without ever actually hearing anything by them.( Yes I know I could have trawled the net , but for some reason I just never got round to it) They sounded terrific, right up my particular street in fact , so their debut album is as welcome as some after sun lotion to the bald idiot ( i.e. me) who's stayed out in the sun too long without wearing a hat. And guess what dear reader? It is terrific. And it is right up my particular street. If you've got any sense it'll be right up your ,s too.....shoved right up tight against the ruddy wheelie bins .The council won't like it but what do they know? They probably like Coldplay and Snow Patrol.
The seven piece have produced an album that is as tasteful; and lovely to own as the exquisite (4AD ..wouldn't you know it ) packaging. The music is a vertiginous or considered sombre concoction of strings, piano ,guitar, brass and walloping /sensitive percussion that adjoins other esoteric elements. So as well as drawing comparisons with Arcade Fire you may well hear Broken Social Scene, Beirut or maybe the great Devotchka .I also sense a divergence with the great band Jack and on some of the up-tempo tracks also catch juicy hints of My Life Story or even The Divine Comedy at their most ornate.
Singer James Sutherland has a voice that wrings every last drop out of every line ,often keeping just the right side of histrionic. The lacerating dramatics of "Nearly Home" , the strident rock chords "It Would Sound Like This " the quivering hollowed out emotion of the title track, the straining strings and echoing piano of " "Thoughts In A Picture( In A Paper January 2009)" the fervent brass and artful strums of "A Promise" all make for truly great songs. And that's before I mention the gleeful hoedown of "If Eilbert Loveborg Wrote A Song " , the perambulating instrumental synthesis Of "A Good Reason " and the final track , the distension and ebb and flow of "Slow Parade" which brings the album to the sort of peak it fully deserves.
The bad have been around a bit now so a debut this accomplished , this confident , lets not mince words this brilliant shouldn't come as too much of a surprise. Yet even though i had extremely high hopes for Broken Records this album surpasses my expectations rather than falls short of them . It's is breathtakingly complex but wholly accessible , it is resonantly emotive without resorting to cliché, bombast or trite sloganeering .it's a completely realised piece of work , it is a great work of art taken from any angle. Along with the MummersTale to Tell ,Melody Gardot,sMy One And Only Thrill and Soap&SkinsLovetune for Vacuum ,this is music to illuminate your life. 2009 may be a complete bust in so many ways but what a year for albums so far ,of which Broken Records astounding debut is the latest.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
on 24 September 2013
I bought this 1st album after having listened to their second album ,Let me come home, for 2 years.. That one is one of my favorite CDs of all. Until The Earth Begins To Part is a great album too , kind of an earlier stage of evolution leading to the second one.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
on 5 June 2009
There is an ambition and bravery on display on this album that is all too lacking in the current British music scene, and this makes for a thrilling listen. Tracks like 'A Promise' and 'Wolves' manages to combine classical, folk, pop and (post) rock influences while still being coherent and entirely original. Some reviews that I've read elsewhere have used the Ibsen references and string-laden crescendos as criticisms. Should we be put off by intelligence? I suppose it depends on what you want from your music, but I'm fed up of the two currently dominant camps: Friday night down the pub music, or 'ironic' bands making knowing nods to past decades. In recent years, for music like that being made by Broken Records, I've had to look to North America (say, Godspeed and BSS), or Europe (say, Sigur Ros). Well now its being made a lot closer to home as well. And that is most definitely a cause for celebration.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Send us feedback

How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you?
Let us know here.