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5.0 out of 5 stars The Brian Clough Story, 9 Feb. 2013
This review is from: Clough - The Brian Clough Story [DVD] (DVD)
This DVD is the best one iv seen of Brian Clough. I loved him then now forever Brian Clough. R.I.P Sir Brian Clough!!
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5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars, 24 July 2014
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This review is from: Clough - The Brian Clough Story [DVD] (DVD)
first class dvd
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5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars, 2 Aug. 2014
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This review is from: Clough - The Brian Clough Story [DVD] (DVD)
excellent dvd
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5 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars SEE THE SOARWAY SUN'S JOHN SADLER WITH PIPE, 16 Aug. 2009
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This review is from: Clough - The Brian Clough Story [DVD] (DVD)
Brian Clough was a poet and a magician who, with his strange musical accent, his smiles, his feints and his metaphors, had the sauce to cast spells over his opponents, whether they were players, comedians or viewers; a shaman who, using a strange type of Ericksonian hypnotism, could bring victory on with supplication on behalf of another world. On this DVD you can see him say in front of Don Revie: " I believe in faeries"; and yea, once more hear him again as you never could on the day it was said, because a television replay capability did not then exist.

Clough knew the power of prophecy, particularly at half time. At this point in one World Cup match he said. "There'll be three more goals from this team before the end of the match." He may well have been wrong a dozen times but when, with that wild surmise, he was right, it was as inviolable as Shelley's "Ode to the West Wind". It is in the nature of inspiration for the poet, on first comparing a great work like Chapman's Homer, and faced with his own (or her) inadequate words, in the teeth of defeat by a poor poem, to laugh and to write about the lack; and by that to create something new. This is what magic is. Wavering on the cusp of his and hers, it is the goal of all Olympians, wearing any strip, to be beloved of the muses. We are human. To be so is to be prepared, as we all are, for illusion and enchantment.

On the pitch, Clough as a player, ran to the barbed wire round the goal as if it was not there. Once in a while, as centre forward and as football manager, by attracting the flak upon himself, the wire had been blown away enough to let him through. He took away fear from his nervous companions in the studio, and dismissed it for the audience at home, too overwrought to watch another moment of history about to be enshrined. For Derby County and their supporters who massed in defence of the sorcery of his days there, it must have looked like a belief in old gods; the same immortals that John Peel, the Liverpool supporter, listened for, when he was LOOKING for something he'd "never heard before". One ingredient of laughter and the essence of courage is the sudden reduction of fear.

If you have any doubt of this magic; if you are curious about the fabled powers of Ericksonian hypnotism, communications skills we are all master of at the time of our greatest need, you must see the TV spectacular reproduced on this valuable DVD when Brian Clough confronts the wizard Don Revie on the VERY DAY that the wayward spirit of the broken football star has been cast out by the management of The Damned United. For Brian Clough, we know now, his greatest conjurations as manager lay before him "like a land of dreams, so various, so beautiful, so new." For Don Revie, manager of England that day and cloaked in all of its magic power, his greatest days were then behind him. It is a meeting of magicians at the peak of their powers. Don Revie uses gentle approaches in order to draw the more nimble master to play for his side. "Brian" he says "I won't call you Clough" (as we all do). We watch them as equals strangely matched. While Clough's silly giggle, of sheer exuberance and inexpressible excitement at such a moment, disappears up into the arc-lights and the studio air; Clough had after all, spent the previous seven weeks attempting to exorcise the lumbering spirit before him from the Leeds United team; Don Revie studiously avoids looking Clough in the eye, as a bull bewitches the matador he is about to gore, by looking steadfastly aside at his red rag.

Clough, in a messianic attempt to carve a new back passage for the town, had suggested to the Leeds team that if they wanted to win awards really worth winning, they must start anew, grant him total dominion and throw away the gilded trinkets they had picked up at the thresholds of fortune and follow him alone down the path to immortality and out of the shades. With hindsight we know exactly what Billy Bremner and his men had gathered their feeble football force to deflect. It was the power that would lift the then unknown Nottingham Forest to win The European Cup twice, something no team for Leeds has ever done. We can see clearly now. Don Revie, compared now to Clough up there in the firmament where I belong myself, was a Sir Bedivere. In defence of his cheating heart and the men he had deserted for another Excalibur, he said "There must have been something."

The DVD records for posterity, uncut, this clash of titans. The moment is recalled when Revie is brought under Clough's spell towards the end of the contest. At this point in the journey however it is obvious that the weapons of both chastened magi are the shafts of affection and respect, not hatred. The moment is when Clough moves in close to the rightly suspicious Don Revie. Clough says "I think Don, that when the chance came for the England job, you were in half a mind to stay on at Leeds to have a crack at the European Cup." Revie is entranced. His defence is breached; his guard so far down he gives up the fight and assures Clough that "I am like you", with an enormous YES! Did Clough know of his mesmeric power on anything more than an intuitive level? These two great managers of ignorant armies that clash by night discovered in the wastes of war, a round table between the sides; and not far off, at the edge of what is truly no man's land, Arthur's barge was waiting to take them both away.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars, 9 Nov. 2014
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This review is from: Clough - The Brian Clough Story [DVD] (DVD)
great
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Clough - The Brian Clough Story  [DVD]
Clough - The Brian Clough Story [DVD] by James Williams (DVD - 2009)
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