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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Bleak trilogy of evil
Having read the books first, 1974, 1977, 1980 and 1983, I have to say it's an achievement in itself to bring anything like an accurate adaptation to the screen. The deep, dark frenetic performance of David Peace's epic quadrilogy could not be transferred wholescale to the screen; thus there is bound to be a shortfall and a compromise. If you haven't got Peace's...
Published on 31 Jan 2011 by Eileen Shaw

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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars An interesting tale
I have watched this drama with some intrest. The drama was well cast and the bleakness of the 1970's and 1980's seemed well portayed. Having not read the books I did find the drama at times confusing. I found the 1983 disc was very good , the drama kept my attention as I felt I wanted this to come to a conclusion which I could understand. I think I got the hang of what...
Published on 30 Jun 2011 by Ms. Heather A. M. Moore


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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Bleak trilogy of evil, 31 Jan 2011
By 
Eileen Shaw "Kokoschka's_cat" (Leeds, England) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Red Riding Trilogy [DVD] (DVD)
Having read the books first, 1974, 1977, 1980 and 1983, I have to say it's an achievement in itself to bring anything like an accurate adaptation to the screen. The deep, dark frenetic performance of David Peace's epic quadrilogy could not be transferred wholescale to the screen; thus there is bound to be a shortfall and a compromise. If you haven't got Peace's excoriating prose in your head, what could you have instead?

For a start, some very good acting. Leads in each of the three films were variable: Andrew Garfield was excellent in 1974, Paddy Considine in 1980, was good. In the final film we saw David Morrissey come to the fore, but I was disappointed in what he did with, admittedly, a role that barely gave credence to his weak-kneed turncoat and which produced the betrayal of Peace's work that was the ending. On the whole, the acting was excellent - Warren Clarke's top-dog copper was wonderfully loathsome, as was Sean Bean's property magnate paedophile.

To sum up, it has to be appreciated for what it was able to do. It was inevitable that any attempt to portray the violent anarchy of the books must fail to do them justice. It is true, nevertheless, that the atmosphere, some of the smelly decrepit evil of the books did come through, all praise to Tony Grisoni, who did not compromise too much on the story-lines (until the very end). I would much rather have this trilogy in this format, with these actors and directors, than not have the thing at all.
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28 of 30 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Riding High, 14 April 2009
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Moony (Ipswich, England) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Red Riding Trilogy [DVD] (DVD)
I understand the comments below about this not being true to the literature of David Peace, but then its hard to judge a film against the book as it will always be lacking in certain departments. Kathryn Fletts comments on the 'literary adaption' were highly misguided but then i think she's a bit of a nutbar in an otherwise quality paper, so i don't really listen to what she has to say.

I'm a fan of literature first and foremost, way before TV/films BUT if i took the view that no good TV/films could come from literary adaptions then this genre, and TV in general, would have no future whatsoever. The fact is, its flourishing.

If Red Riding is to be knocked with the age old criticisms of film versions of books then it will always be a non starter. Therefore it has to be judged on its own merits and look at the strengths that it can bring to the table. And judged on its own merits, this is by far the best bit of TV that i have seen in the recent past. If this doesn't sit at the top of the TV pile, then what the hell does? F**k its relation to the books, this is what TV is all about.

It takes the strengths that TV has to offer, in creating mood, intensity and tension from the aesthetics of whats on your screen and uses them to tip top effect. The look and feel of the shows are a credit to the directors and the production staff as i was visually enthralled by them as well as being truly hooked by the pace, action, plots. All the stories are bleak and depressing but i couldn't keep my eyes of them.

TV at the moment is firmly focussed on the gritty series from the states such as the Wire, etc. This trilogy stands up to them no doubt. And in re-creating the mood and detail of the late 70's/early 80's northern mindset, this is closer to home and thus, for me, more instantly compelling.

Loved. It.
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27 of 29 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars To the North where we do what we want ..., 14 Nov 2010
By 
L. Davidson (Belfast, N.Ireland) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Red Riding Trilogy [DVD] (DVD)
"The Red Riding Trilogy" is a quite superb series of films based on David Peace's "Red Riding" books. The three films , 1974,1980 and 1983 ,are all excellent stand alone films , but the complex way in which they are all interlinked is carried off with some aplomb. The films tell harrowing stories about police corruption and child abuse in which decent people are few and far between and who either get marginalised or murdered. The acting in all three films is stunning as is is the stylish cinematography and atmospheric music. The characterisation is immense and there are some of the most dastardly villains in these films that have ever appeared on TV cop series (most of them being policemen). The stories in the films are gripping and intricate,gritty and credible. The police emerge from "The Red Riding Trilogy" in an appalling way (a few good apples in a sea of bad ones) as the sleazy underbelly of West Yorkshire is exposed in a dramatic way. CSI or The Bill this isn't ; instead the viewer is treated to a mesmerising , intelligent and haunting series of films that are vastly superior to most cop shows and films you are ever likely to see.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars An interesting tale, 30 Jun 2011
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Ms. Heather A. M. Moore "FILM ADDICT" (NOTTINGHAM UK.) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Red Riding Trilogy [DVD] (DVD)
I have watched this drama with some intrest. The drama was well cast and the bleakness of the 1970's and 1980's seemed well portayed. Having not read the books I did find the drama at times confusing. I found the 1983 disc was very good , the drama kept my attention as I felt I wanted this to come to a conclusion which I could understand. I think I got the hang of what had happened but like so much Tv drama now it wasnt easily signposted so I feel I would need to read the books to pencil in any gaps in my understanding. But I did think the acting was great , the sinister policeman and the use of there interview skills made me want to shout at the television the films really did have a portyel on all types of cruelty man inflicts on man or in some cases on children so this isnt an easy watch but this does make you think and I would recommed it for the acting.
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33 of 39 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Awesome, 26 Mar 2009
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tallpete33 (London, UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Red Riding Trilogy [DVD] (DVD)
I caught this excellent trilogy on Channel 4 and loved its stark and brutal take on real events in 70's and 80's Yorkshire. It is based on the David "The Damned Utd" Peace quadrilogy of books. Great scripts and a huge cast of the best of British actors make this a must see. All three episodes are linked, linked by the same police officers covering their trail of corruption, violence and dealings with John Dawson (Sean Bean) the "property magnate" whose taste for young girls was their eventual undoing.

From 1974 when Vauxhall Viva driving crime reporter Edward Dunfold discovers more than is good for him, to 1980 when a Greater Manchester detective pays the price for crossing his Yorkshire "colleagues" on the Ripper case to 1983 when more children go missing and the scapegoats for earlier missing children are exposed for being just that, this is a hard and gritty set of films.

The performances are excellent all round. The plot twists and turns and goes back and forth so you have to concentrate but this is not a hardship because it is just so good and so compelling. Sean Bean is an excellent choice as the charismatic but evil Dawson, Warren Clarke is as watchable as ever, ditto Paddy Considine, Mark Addy, David Morrissey - I could go on, trust me. Be warned though, this is dark and often violent stuff -particularly the interrogation scenes in the "belly" - definitely not for the feint hearted.

You can rave on about your Sopranos, Heroes, CSI or whatever, but when British TV gets it right, nobody does it better. Watch them all close together and see why I gave it five stars.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Three fine films; four excellent books., 24 Nov 2013
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M. Joyce (Cairo, Egypt) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Red Riding Trilogy [DVD] (DVD)
I actually saw the TV series before I read David Peace's quartet of novels. It was one of those programmes that kind of crept up on me; I was gripped by the final part, but didn't fully "take in" the first film.

Anyhow, on the strength of reading (and loving) "The Damned United", I turned to David Peace's so-called "Red Riding" quartet of novels and was immediately hooked. They were not an easy read...far from it...due not only to the uncompromising nature of the content, but also to the author's narrative style, but I found them extremely rewarding.

I decided that it was, therefore, time to revisit the TV series, marketed as "The Red Riding Trilogy". Herein lies, perhaps, the major difference between the films and the books; the films are a sequence of three, while the four books form a quartet.

The book that they chose not to film, "1977", was in many ways the most difficult and it is easy to see why this was not included. It focuses on the half-decent copper Bob Fraser and the burnt-out hack Jack Whitehead; one is left with a sense of regret, however, as this latter character is given a tantalizing cameo by the great Eddie Marsan in "1974", the first of the three films.

It is all too easy to make an unfavourable comparison between a film and the book on which it is based and, indeed, many of the reviews of this DVD set have done just that (I've been guilty of it myself, I should add), but while one might regret certain omissions and changes from the original (the ending of the film version of "1983" is rather more upbeat than the book, for example), it has to be said that these three films are very effective in their own terms and, it cannot be denied, have considerable artistic merit. Moreover, they are true both to the spirit and word of their original source, some passages of dialogue being lifted directly from the books.

The same writer, Tony Grisoni, is responsible for the script in all three films, but three different filmmakers are involved. All three do a superb job, but be warned; these films are as disturbing as they are complex and it is far from an east watch. They may on the face of it be thrillers, but we are very much in the realm of "film noir", a million miles away from Hollywood action movies. These are dirty, grimy films and even the colours have a grainy, washed out look to them.

This is especially true of the first film, "1974", in which a cynical young journalist (played by Andrew Garfield, then on the cusp of international stardom) returns home to Yorkshire, where he finds himself thrown into a nightmarish world of murder, sleaze and corruption. Garfield is terrific, as are Rebecca Hall and Sean Bean.
This film lays the foundations for the next two films and introduces us to the recurring characters played by David Morrissey and Warren Clarke (brilliant!).

The star of "1980" is undoubtedly Paddy Considine, surely one of the most underrated actors of his generation. The film focuses on police corruption and once again it makes pretty depressing, if riveting viewing. There is, however, some seriously good acting here; not only from Considine, but also from Maxine Peake (from whom I've never seen a bad performance) and from an actor hitherto unknown to me, Sean Harris, who quite takes your breath away as the corrupt policeman Bob Craven. In terms of acting, this is the pick of the three films.

The third film, "1983', resolves some, if not all, of the plot-lines introduced in the first two films; it is consequently in some ways more satisfying than the first two films and yet at the same time fails to plumb their emotional depths, despite some wonderful acting performances. David Morrissey is, of course, very much a known quantity and he's rarely less than excellent, but I wasn't entirely convinced by his character here. He plays Detective Inspector Maurice Jobson, who is plagued by guilt over his participation in the nefarious activities of the West Yorkshire Constabulary, but it is Mark Addy (whom I had hitherto considered primarily as a comic actor) who holds centre stage as the deeply flawed solicitor John Piggott. These two characters at least achieve some sort of redemption, as does the male prostitute BJ, stunningly played by Robert Sheehan. In a series chock-a-block with fabulous acting, two other actors stand out; Peter Mullan as the insidious Rev. Martin Laws and Daniel Mays, heart-breakingly good as Michael Myshkin, the mentally retarded man accused of the serial killings in 1974. There is also a chilling cameo by Joseph Mawle as the real life Yorkshire Ripper, Peter Sutcliffe.

To return to the point I was making at the start of this review; do I think that the television trilogy is better than the literary quartet? Well, actually, no, I don't. But do I think that these films work brilliantly? The answer, most emphatically, is "yes".
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Whithout subtitles, 31 Oct 2013
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This review is from: Red Riding Trilogy [DVD] (DVD)
The Cds are very good but I very dissapointed with them since they haven't got subtitles.Because of the fact that I'm estuding English, subtitles are very important so I can't understand anything....
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Brilliant, 28 July 2013
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T. Yelland (London, England) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Red Riding Trilogy [DVD] (DVD)
Quite simply put, this was one of the most brilliant things british television has produced in the last fifteen or so years. Though much credit must be passed to David Peace for the fabulous quartet of books, on which this is based, the scriptwriters and directors have done a fantastic job in both slimming this down to a trilogy and evoking so wholly the era in which this was set. It should be noted that while there were three different directors involved, one for each feature length, the plot and character development does not suffer.

The quality of the acting and the production is first class, and the storyline is both gripping and (given many recent revelations about police collusions with the establishment) believable albeit grim.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars This Is The North, 16 May 2013
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prisrob "pris," (New England USA) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Red Riding Trilogy [DVD] (DVD)
'This Is The North, We Do What We Want', so says the policeman in West Yorkshire, England, town of Leeds. What we have here is a trilogy, 3 films of the times, 1974, 1980, and 1983 in this town and the tale of murders of young girls.

Most of the trilogy is about the corrupt police, botched investigations, the brutality and seemingly senseless mayhem that occurs during these nine years. In 1974, it seems the Ripper, aka 'Jack the Ripper' was out and about committing rape and murder of young girls, The public becomes distraught at the inept police force, but they are unable to move on it because of fear. A young reporter Eddie Dunford played by Andrew Garfield, takes on this world. From what Dunford can see, the police are too compromised to catch anyone. And it seems so corrupt that they influence everyone around them.

In '1980', the Ripper is still at work. The Home Office sends an inspector from Manchester to find the killer and clean up the mess in the police department. Peter Hunter played by Paddy Considine is an experienced detective. However, he has personal and family issues that keep interfering. The 'Ripper; is caught but disclaims knowledge of certain murders, which it appears the police were committing under the guise of the Ripper. Peter Hunter is caught in this maze and does not fare well.

In 'Red Riding: 1983' the deaths of the past decade sickens one of the police higher-ups, Maurice Jobson played by David Morrissey. He has been in on the fix all along, and undergoes a gradual awakening. He is joined in the fight by a shabby lawyer, John Piggott, played by Mark Addy, a hard drinking failure who is stricken by his own family connection to the Yorkshire violence. Into this mix and seen throughout the three films, but unable to reveal what he knows, we finally hear the hustler, B.J., played by Robert Sheehan. He witnessed some of the crimes, and narrates some surprises. The cycle of murder and corruption is brought to a close.

The first part of the trilogy was difficult for me to understand, some of the accents were difficult to follow and the storyline did not make sense. It took the second trilogy 1980 and 1983 to clarify the stories. Some of the same players follow throughout all of the trilogy. The greed, brutality and corruption is difficult to take at times. Could this really occur in any town, at any time? The direction and acting are exceptional. Each of the trilogies has a new director, but somehow the storyline was kept very recognizable. The innocents are given their day, and the true heroes are found.

Recommended. prisrob
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Best of British Television, 1 Mar 2013
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Predating those dark Scandi-thrillers by a few years, Red Riding is one of the best examples of home-grown TV drama.
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Red Riding Trilogy [DVD]
Red Riding Trilogy [DVD] by James Marsh (DVD - 2009)
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