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108 of 115 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars "...I'm Glad You're Out Sir...I Mean Back..."
I ripped the shrink-wrap off this little gem this morning with the glee of a six-year old delinquent given a day pass to Cadburys. I then sat down to watch it and emerged two hours later with the grin of a 51-year old Cheshire cat on Viagra.

We all know "The Italian Job" is a Sixties classic, but what you don't know is that this 40th Anniversary reissue of it...
Published on 11 May 2009 by Mark Barry

versus
9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Good restoration but shame about the low sound
The picture quality on this one is really fantastic - especially when you consider that the movie is forty years old.

However, like at least one other reviewer, I find the sound is far too low when played on a normal HD TV (Panny Viera). Using an AV receiver helps: but not everyone has one of these. So, to hear this film clearly, you may have to jack the volume...
Published on 13 Dec 2009 by MacAvity


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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Best of British., 18 Feb 2008
This review is from: The Italian Job [DVD] [1969] (DVD)
`The Italian Job' is the quintessential British comedy heist movie. Advertised as `The Car's the Star' due to the use of three Mini Coopers as the ideal escape vehicles which, admittedly, did perform magnificently. However Michael Cane as Michael Cane, err sorry Charlie Crocker, Noel Coward as Mr Bridges and Benny Hill as Professor Peach takes some beating. Event the supporting cast are fantastic Irene Handle as Miss Plum and John Le Messieur as a faultless prison governor.

The biggest star is however the cracking dialogue, the obvious line to quote here is of course `I only said blow the bloody doors off!' however equally impressive is Crocker's tailor on viewing his shirts `What did you do? Life?', and the timeless `The only way to get through it if we all work together and that means you do exactly what I say'

Since it has been recorded elsewhere that you cannot beat perfection then why anyone would want to remake this film beats me. `Hang on a minute, I've got a great idea...'
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars a classic that has survived the test of time, 12 Mar 2000
By A Customer
Caine, Coward and Hill in crazy car chase capers. Charlie Croker(Caine)inherits the blueprint for a heist to lift $4m of gold en-route to Turin. Bankrolled by Mr Bridger(Coward), an underworld Mr Big, Caine recruits a team to pull off the job. A manufactured traffic jam, three minis, and the architecture of Turin are the ingredients of this classic sixties movie. How does it end ? If you don't know, I won't spoil it for you
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars you must have shot an awful lot of tigers sir ......yes i use a machine gun, 15 Aug 2007
By 
M. A. Canavan "maca" (Ireland) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Italian Job [DVD] [1969] (DVD)
there are so many marvelous quotes from this film you couldn't count them all, Caine at his wonderful best with a cast and crew to match , Noel Coward gives us a real cracker with his performance of Mr Bridger , the one liners about his aunt nelly will always raise a titter, don't read the negatives and just enjoy the crack. You'll love it.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Fantastic DVD, 27 Aug 2002
By A Customer
This review is from: The Italian Job [DVD] [1969] (DVD)
..I received it for my birthday yesterday, and watched it with a Martini in my hand.
And by jingo, it's a treat. The quality of the picture on the DVD is fantasticly vivid - watching the opening credits it was difficult to remember that the piece of film I was watching was filmed the best part of 34 years ago! The job they've done on the sound is equally impressive, with the full Dolby 5.1 stream as clear as a bell. They've clearly spent some time cleaning this baby up - it makes the print the BBC have look very lacking!
The extras on the disk aren't a let down - the documentary is thorough and quite fascinating, the one deleted scene is a joy to watch and made more interesting with the commentary, and the original trailer is great to see, especially for those of us too young to remember it coming out. The animated menus just add to this and are great fun.
I could mention how great the film is, but if you're reading this chances are you already know that. However, you can be assured that this DVD - which I've been waiting four years for, all in all - more than does the film justice.
Superb!
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Amazing, 11 Dec 2009
This review is from: The Italian Job - 40th Anniversary Edition [Blu-ray] [1969] (Blu-ray)
I'm not going to go on about the film, apart from it being one of the greatest British movies of all time. The Blu Ray edition is worth every penny a great transfer thanks to the BFI. Sound is excellent and the bundled extras make this a worthy Blu Ray for any collection.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Up there with the best ever british films.., 25 Aug 2003
This review is from: The Italian Job [DVD] [1969] (DVD)
This is one of those classics everybody likes, and that will always be known. Michael Caine at his best but the true performance comes from the three mini coopers. Each one part of the best car chase sequence ever made. However it does have its sad moments.....an Aston Martin DB5 and 2 Jaguar E-Types destroyed.....heart breaking sob,sob......sorry.
An all out British flick which you will laugh, cringe and smile at over and over. Not a bad ending either.
-Shame about the new version coming out- (imagine setting it in Los Angeles...tsk tsk)
Once agian, great film. A must see and buy!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars look out! here comes the minis!!, 25 Nov 2003
By 
Deborah MacGillivray "Author," (US & UK) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)    (REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Italian Job [DVD] [1969] (DVD)
This film really showcased Michael's comedic talent, and with the backing of the super cast right down to Benny Hill, it's a super time. Michael plays the mastermind behind a gold heist, while Benny Hill is the technical genius making Michael's scheme work. Where most films of "the big heist" is on the actual job, this film set itself out by using humour and the Coopers escape to make it one fabulously funny time.
Caine is at his best as the freshly out of jail, but far from reformed crook. The end is just so droll!!!
Glad to add this one my Michael Caine collection!
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A miracle, 9 Dec 2009
This review is from: The Italian Job - 40th Anniversary Edition [Blu-ray] [1969] (Blu-ray)
If you get extra points for being older, this has to be the greatest Blu-Ray of them all. The quality is unbelievable. This is a 40 year old film offering reference level sharpness and very good depth and plasticity. When you take into account that the format cannot guarantee that for films from the last five years, this disc ends up looking like a miracle. There is nothing to criticise on the picture quality side. Nothing. Colours and contrasts look perfect to me. Just a beautiful picture from start to finish that sucks you in.

The Dolby True HD 5.1 soundtrack is not at the reference level of the best modern films, but it is still very high quality with a genuine sense of surround. The music comes across superbly and the scene in jail where the inmates are clapping to the football supporters' tune 'dah-dah dah-dah-dah dah-dah-dah-dah ENGLAND!' is truly thrilling. When you think that England were world champions when this film was made, it takes on an extra piquancy too.

I was also surprised by how modern the film seems. Humour can date horribly, but the irony of the film still manages to seem quite contemporary. The general, classic attitude of the English to foreigners (especially foreigners who have the cheek to think they stop being foreigners when they stay in their own country :-)) is wonderfully captured. And the line "Now, remember, in this country they drive on the wrong side of the road" was probably the funniest of the lot; I cannot understand why the "blow the doors off" quote became this film's most famous legacy.

Michael Caine is brilliant and just manages to avoid crossing the line over to an all-out impersonation of himself. But the star of the film is, no, not the Mini, Noel Coward! He is just perfect in every scene and lends the film priceless style and gravitas.

If you want to have an evening of great fun in absolutely up-to-date HD quality, then buy this classic film. There are also fun extras, with plenty about the Mini's role in the film. Enjoy!
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5.0 out of 5 stars The Italian Job - 40th Anniversary Edition [Blu-ray] [1969], 20 Oct 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: The Italian Job - 40th Anniversary Edition [Blu-ray] [1969] (Blu-ray)
THE ITALIAN JOB – 40th Anniversary Special Edition [1969] [Blu-ray] A Film That Exuberantly Celebrates The Fact That It’s Ace Being British!

Join Sir Michael Caine and his gang of crooks for the ultimate British caper movie packed with fast cars, beautiful girls and swinging 60’s action. In his final screen appearance, Sir Noel Coward joyfully sends up his own patriotic persona, and there are small though priceless cameos from the likes of Irene Handl and John Le Mesurier.

‘The Italian Job’ 40th Anniversary Special Edition blows the doors off with astonishing array of BRAND NEW extras, including EXCLUSIVE INTERVIEWS WITH SIR MICHAEL CAINE, QUINCY JONES and others, as the tell us what really happened making ‘The Italian Job.’ PLUS HOST OF STUNTS, MINIS and MORE, in this thrilling set of DEFINITIVE DOCUMENTARIES and COMMENTARIES.

Cast: Sir Michael Caine, Sir NoŽl Coward, Benny Hill, Raf Vallone, Tony Beckley, Rossano Brazzi, Maggie Blye, Irene Handl, John Le Mesurier, Fred Emney, John Clive, Graham Payn, Michael Standing, Stanley Caine, Barry Cox, Harry Baird, George Innes, John Forgeham, Robert Powell, Derek Ware, Frank Jarvis, David Salamone, Richard Essame, Mario Valgoi, Renato Romano, Franco Norvelli, Robert Rietti, David Kelly, Arnold Diamond, Simon Dee and Henry McGee

Director: Peter Collinson

Producer: Michael Deeley

Screenplay: Troy Kennedy Martin

Composer: Quincy Jones

Cinematography: Douglas Slocombe

Video Resolution: 1080p

Aspect Ratio: 2.35:1 [Anamorphic]

Audio: English: 5.1 Dolby TrueHD, English: Dolby Digital Mono, French: Dolby Digital Mono, German: Dolby Digital Mono, Italian: Dolby Digital Mono and Spanish: Dolby Digital Mono

Subtitles: English, English SDH, Danish, Dutch, Finnish, French, German, Italian, Norwegian, Portuguese, Spanish and Swedish

Running Time: 95 minutes

Region: All Regions

Number of discs: 1

Studio: Paramount Home Entertainment

Andrew’s Blu-ray Review: In this classic crime film, small-time crook Charlie Croker [Sir Michael Caine] organises a motley group of thieves to steal four million worth of gold bullion from an armoured car in Turin, Italy. The mastermind of the heist is Mr. Bridger [Sir Noel Coward], an experienced convict who has come up with the idea, but can't take part in its execution because he's in jail. To pull off the plan, the gang must tie up traffic in the centre of the city to divert attention from the robbery, and ultimately make off with their booty undetected. The caper leads to one of the most exciting and fantastic automobile chases ever filmed.

I can’t stress enough how wonderfully, quintessentially ‘60s ‘The Italian Job’ is. The cars, the clothes, the music, the camera work, the exuberance. And the women — ironed down hair, goofy underwear, and every one of them as beautiful as a Bond girl, with even less dialogue. Because the film is essentially quirky British attitude, the robbery is not simply a capitalist venture. The heist comes across, however vaguely and misguidedly, as the last hurrah of some youthful social rebellion. The films light-hearted tone turns briefly revolutionary as the lad's club police officers and smash pickaxe handles through cop car windshields. ‘The Italian Job’ also makes light of the antagonism Britain has always had with the rest of Europe (“bloody foreigners” one of the crooks mutters as he wanders Italy). Words and phrases like “anarchy” and “angry young man” would not be inappropriate. This was the ‘60s, after all, when even action movies were allowed to have social commentary.

Enter the legendary Sir Michael Caine, in one sharp suit after another, whose name is deservedly painted like the Union Jack in the re-release trailer. He plays Charlie Croaker, fresh from prison with absolutely no compunction about turning to crime again. The prize is a half-ton of gold being transported through a giant traffic jam in Turin during an Italy-UK soccer match. To this end, Croaker enlists a small army of Cockney crooks, and soon it’s “bloomin’” this and “bloody” that as the lads soup up three mini Coopers. There’s bugger-all we can do about it as we’re off to Italy where our heroes can short out computerized video cameras, cross the Mafia, and walk nonchalantly past jaw-dropping Renaissance architecture. The movie doesn’t bother developing the gang too much; Tony Beckley is the prissy one, Stanley Caine (Michael’s brother) is the lummox, and Benny Hill is… well, Benny Hill, and let’s all thank God for that.

Blu-ray Video Quality – Top shelf image from Paramount on this classic brilliant British film. All the stunning 1080p encode image and with the breath taking 2.35:1 [Anamorphic] aspect ratio has a stunning bright, happy colours, and impressively high detail for a film celebrating its 40th birthday, which you would thought was filmed today. It shows some depth, strong contrast and black levels. It looks almost brand new and seems to have greatly benefited from the move to hi-def. The visuals approach the spectacular with over 26 Gig being filled on the dual-layered disc for the feature film. All in all Paramount has done a sterling impressive job.

Blu-ray Audio Quality – On the English language front we have a brilliant 5.1 TrueHD Master Audio Surround mix or you have the option for the restored mono track. The disc starts by giving you a choice of about a dozen different languages for menus and optional DUBs and subs. I'm usually a fan of the original but I switched to the 5.1 TrueHD mix as it gives you a much more natural sound and it suited the film well with so many more subtle effect noise and sympathetic music tones sounding crisp and clean. The car chase scenes are dramatic and evenly separated with some action to the rear speakers.

Blu-ray Special Features and Extras:

Commentary with screenwriter Troy Kennedy Martin and Mathew Field, author of "The Making of The Italian Job" – A great, very informative commentary. The two gentlemen discuss the history of the film, what it took to get it made, how it resonated with critics and audiences, etc. With optional German, English, Spanish, French and Italian subtitles.

Commentary by producer Michel Deeley and Matthew Field, author of "The Making of The Italian Job" – A new commentary recorded for the special edition of the film. Once again, a wealth of information is supplied. With optional German, English, Spanish, French and Italian subtitles.

Self Preservation Society: Making The Italian Job [1080p] [89:00] A selection of behind-the scenes episodes where many of those who were involved with the film talk about its history, legacy, appeal, style, etc. A terrific supplemental feature. With optional Danish, German, English, Spanish, French, Italian, Norwegian, Portuguese, Finnish and Swedish subtitles.

Mini Adventures [1080p] [17:00] A look at the history of the Mini Cooper and its appeal. Some of the key chase sequences from the film are addressed. With optional Danish, German, English, Spanish, French, Italian, Norwegian, Portuguese, Finnish and Swedish subtitles.

Music Video [1080p] [4:00] The Self-preservation society.

The Deleted Scene with commentary by author Matthew Field [480i] [2:00] The only deleted scene from the film is deconstructed by Matthew Field. With optional German, English, Spanish, French and Italian subtitles.

Original Theatrical Trailer [1080p]

Re-Release Theatrical Trailer [1080p]

Finally, this is such a fun film and Sir Michael Caine is totally perfect. ‘The Italian Job’ is a fun British Comedy Caper. Excellent performances, and one of the most memorable car chases ever filmed make this a very enjoyable movie. Paramount presents this film in a special collector’s edition with some interesting added features. The menu sequence is also nicely done, with a 3D animated rendering of the three Minis. This Blu-ray is close to perfect – impeccable image transfer, great audio options and, possibly, the most complete extras of the year. Super job Paramount and Wow - what a package! The other amazing aspect of this film, is hearing the silky smooth voice of the amazing British Singer Matt Monro singing over the opening credits, that was composed by Quincy Jones, and includes "On Days Like These" and the lyrics were penned by Don Black, another brilliant Brit. Very STRONGLY Recommended!

Andrew C. Miller – Your Ultimate No.1 Film Fan
Le Cinema Paradiso
WARE, United Kingdom
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5.0 out of 5 stars Absolute genius, 5 Dec 2008
By 
Andrew Rossiter (Halesowen, England) - See all my reviews
What three films could be better placed together than these three? Michael Caine looks swish and stylish in all three. In Zulu, his first major motion picture, it is astounding how easily he pulls of the arrogance that he does. A superb film, Zulu is an epic film about an epic battle. Modelled very closely on the actual events that took place at Rorke's Drift unlike lots of Hollywood epics, there are a few minor alterations to the real story but they by no means take anything away from the film. Unlike the blurb above says, this battle actually took place during the 19th century in 1879. A brilliant film.

In Alfie Michael Caine plays an rougish antihero. As he is the narrator and the film is all about him, Alfie starts off seeming like a loveable sort of guy, but the more you learn about him, the more you realise that he should be thoroughly unlikeable. A great plot line with great acting, presents an image of the "everyday person" living in the sixties. With humour throughout, this film really is a must see.

Italian Job. Brilliant. Such a happy-go-lucky film. Although (in essence) dealing with organised crime, it a really light hearted caper with Michael Caine and Noel Coward both in excellent form. As with Alfie it has touches of the sixties about it that could not happen in a high budget remake (as happened for both films). For example in Italian Job Benny Hill plays a professor who likes really big women, and in Alfie his women aren't all the "perfect" looking women that you get in modern films.

All three films are worthy of the title classics, and will always remain so.
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