Customer Reviews


55 Reviews
5 star:
 (24)
4 star:
 (24)
3 star:
 (6)
2 star:
 (1)
1 star:    (0)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


15 of 15 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent release of this underated gem
A gem of a movie that's often discounted as it is one of Star Trek's "odd numbered" movies, popularly believed to all be poor. Star Trek 3 suffers unfairly under this: through directoral flair it succeeds as a film in it's own right while still serving as an excellent sequel to Star Trek 2, and maintains the same high standard that film set. The cast all shine in their...
Published on 29 Jan 2003 by Jonathan Stilts

versus
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Best of the odd numbered trek
I think this film works well as the middle part of the 'trilogy' of Kahn, Search and Voyage (On its own it is nothing more than an expensive TV episode). Despite it being rather flat there are some standout moments - we get to see Spacedock, Excelsior, the Star Trek cantina, the death of Enterprise and the always watchable Christopher Lloyd as Cmdr Kruge. 6/10.
Published on 29 Feb 2008 by T. Williams


‹ Previous | 1 26 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

15 of 15 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent release of this underated gem, 29 Jan 2003
A gem of a movie that's often discounted as it is one of Star Trek's "odd numbered" movies, popularly believed to all be poor. Star Trek 3 suffers unfairly under this: through directoral flair it succeeds as a film in it's own right while still serving as an excellent sequel to Star Trek 2, and maintains the same high standard that film set. The cast all shine in their own moments (especially Sulu), and William Shatner is at his best - performing as well as he did in Star Trek 2 but with a meatier part. Spock may have died at the end of the last film, but here Kirk is forced to risk everything, and looses much. Perhaps Leonard Nimoy observed how Nick Meyer managed to pull so convincing a performance from Shatner in the previous film, because he's certainly never as good after Star Trek 3.
This DVD is a great improvement over previous releases - two dics gives you extras that are always informative and for the most part truly interesting. The directors commentary gives Leonard Nimoy the chance to speak with his directors hat on for a change instead of as an actor, and gives good insight into what it's like for an actor to direct for the first time - it makes me want to buy "Three men and a baby" purely to see how his experiences develop.
All else that can be said is that the sound and picture quality are excellent throughout (especially considering how old this movie is), as are the discs animated menus. Oh, and hunt out for the easter egg - it contains probably the best documentary on this two-disc set.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Star Trek Universe Expands, 29 Feb 2004
By 
Dave (Edinburgh) - See all my reviews
Often derided as one of the poorer Trek films due to its chance place in the broad "odd-numbered film curse," Star Trek III is one of my very favourites. It continues successfully in the vein of "Wrath of Khan".
The character interaction is at its very best, with the possibility of bringing Spock back to life causing Kirk, McCoy, Sulu, Uhura, Chekov and Scotty to steal the Enterprise and effectively end their Starfleet careers in the ultimate gesture of friendship: the needs of the one outweigh the needs of the many. Even the action element of the movie is up there with the more acclaimed Star Trek II; Klingon Commander Kruge is a great bad guy and it's a testament to the actor that after a few minutes I've almost forgotten he was in Back to the Future.
The only flaw with the DVD is that, aside from the commentary and special features, there's little to entice those who already own the much cheaper Star Trek III DVD; although colours are striking and the picture is sharp, it doesn't seem as 'clean' as the re-released Star Trek II, and there are no deleted scenes inserted like in the previous two movies. In terms of the film however, it's a funny ("how can you be deaf with ears like that?") and exciting journey that expanded the Star Trek universe visually for the first time, even if Shatner is still wearing a wig.
The special features are extensive and interesting, for the most part. Klingon language creator and teacher Marc Okrand gives insight into how the language was developed for this film, and altered according to the great Christopher Lloyd's pronunciations, while Industrial Light and Magic effects crew explain how they developed the designs for the U.S.S. Excelsior, Spacedock and Klingon Bird-of-Prey - all of which would be used again and again in the Next Generation. The director's commentary from Leonard Nimoy is also one of the best commentaries I've heard for a couple of reasons: firstly, it is informative and gives insight to how Leonard directed scenes, and secondly it's Spock.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


16 of 17 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars 'Someone is stealing the Enterprise-!', 11 Sep 2003
By 
Amazon Customer (London, United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
MOVIE: Possibly my favourite of these films. Basically a simple story about loyalty and sacrifice, but all the best stories - and films - boil down to such a simple concept, and unlike almost ever science fiction movie made since Star Wars the story is never overshadowed by the visuals. Indeed, part of my fondness for this film is its low-budget look; it has a greater resemblance to the classic series than any of the other films. First-time director Leonard Nimoy gives all directors of science-fiction films an important lesson with the 'stealing the Enterprise' scene - that tension and excitement can be generated far more effectively by having things move painfully s-l-o-w-l-y than by filling the screen with action and explosions. Are you listening, George-?
THE DVD: Isn't it nice when these things are done properly? The clutch of documentaries is entertaining and informative, especially Shatner's contribution... his interviews are becoming the highlight of these discs - is really a egomaniac or is he just teasing us-? There is a lot of duplication of material between the documentaries and the commentary - more careful editing would have been good - otherwise the commentary is excellent - a generous amount of it is Nimoy's own recollections. The text commentary (which takes the form of subtitles) is padded out with a lot of nerdy trivia but also full of intriguing stuff- especially when it points out the little tricks and economy measures in the set design and special effects - also there is one tragically ironic reference to the space shuttle Columbia, evidently recorded shortly before its sad end.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A treat for fans, 20 Nov 2009
By 
K. O'Leary (Milton Keynes, England) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Rightly placed half-way through the classic crew's saga (to match its middling reputation), Star Trek III nevertheless proves to be a stirring if slightly self important adventure. Leonard Nimoy makes a strong directorial debut though, and extracts some pretty good performances from his cast, particularly Kirk's legendary falling over / Klingon cursing / blubbing like a girl scene - surely a highlight of the series (and say what you want about Shatner's acting, the guy certainly has a strong and likeable screen presence). Nimoy also encourages a little more liberty to be taken with the humour, such as Scottie's chucklesome "up yer shaft" quip, surprisingly out of place the first time you hear it, but on reflection is totally in keeping with the character (Nimoy, of course, continues to explore humour even more successfully in the saga's next instalment, The Voyage Home). Budget restraints meant recycling a lot of the sets, costumes and materials from Star Trek II, which are well used, although we do see the guys for the first time out on the town in some pretty camp 23rd century "casual wear" (Chekov appears to feel most comfortable off duty in a pink babygro, while Kirk plumps for the Liberace look. The less said about Sulu's cape the better). Effects still look good though, the CGI in particular is high quality for the time, although the Genesis planet set does have the air of a TV production. Matte work though is barely adequate in some places (check out the simple painted backdrop behind the actors as the conclusion is played out on Vulcan).

Image quality on Blu-ray is very high, with vivid colours, excellent detail and fine grain. Sound is also excellent, punchy with clear dialogue. The mix also goes all the way up to 7.1 for those who are able to enjoy it, and there's a good choice of soundtracks and extensive subtitles. Extra content is generous, and a lot of it is in HD. The commentary is also worth a listen, Nimoy's contribution being the most interesting (he obviously feels a lot of pride for the project), although I would much prefer listening to a group of people watching and commenting together on a film rather than the edited sound bite style used here.

All in all, a very fine release.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars SPOCK DOCTORED, 24 Jun 2009
By 
Amazon Customer (Leeds, England) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)   
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
SYNOPSIS
ADMIRAL KIRK and his bridge crew risk their careers stealing the decommissioned Enterprise to return to the restricted Genesis Planet to recover SPOCK's body.

THE FILM
Directed by LEONARD NIMOY, this is the one where WILLIAM SHATNER really acts. A beautiful, low-key performance (I am not joking), purposely reigned in by a colleague who knew exactly how to handle what is in effect a study about life, death and rebirth. It also has something insightful to say about friendship and sacrifice - huge continuing themes, all of significant importance here (and, if you're into that sort of thing, there are any number of Shakesperian references to be found throughout the television episodes and movies, just by scratching at the surface).

STAR TREK III: THE SEARCH FOR SPOCK was deeply satisfying to me, but not for most of the fans, it seems. Many thought it was too maudlin. But that's their loss, because if ever a STAR TREK film had something to say about the Triumph of the Human Spirit then this was it; Nimoy captured something no other director has managed before or since. And it's still got all the sci-fi trappings you could ever wish for, so what's not to like?

THE DISK
The Blu-Ray transfer is so detailed it actually emphasizes the 'garbage' mattes around the ENTERPRISE in the 'approach to Spacedock' sequence, a particularly harrowing example. Other than that, it's solid and consistent throughout. Colour is vivid, yet lifelike, and the sound is marginally better than the Special Edition DVD release, but dialogue still lacks high-end sharpness.

AND FINALLY...WILLIAM SHATNER
For once, the ham was placed to one side, no lines were carved up and no scenery chewed. The Transformed Man went for it and gave us something truly special.

VERY HIGHLY RECOMMENDED
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4.0 out of 5 stars Trek film No.3 - He's NOT dead, Jim!, 21 May 2009
Beware Spoilers!
Following directly on from the brilliant Wrath of Khan, the third film in the franchise sees the crew going in search of Spock's body to try and reunite it with his consciousness that he apparently left inside Dr McCoy's mind. A clever way to bring the character back after it looked like we'd certainly seen the last of him. The film does suffer from the abscence of Nimoy who only appears briefly at the end, although Spock's prescence is felt very strongly throughout the film. The tension and excitement is somewhat lacking after the nailbiting 2nd film, but this is still a very enjoyable outing for our ageing heroes and it has the added bonus of a strong appearance by old foes the Klingons, the leader, played with relish by Christopher Lloyd, is a thouroughly dispicable character.With space battles, strange planets, klingons, mystical mumbo-jumbo on Vulcan and solid performances from all the main cast, The Search For Spock is probably the most old-skool style Trek film of them all, and surely will not dissappoint any Trekkies. Deforest Kelley gets some good scenes in this, and Shatner gives possibly his finest performance ever in the scene where he learns his son has just been killed by a Kilngon - I think he pitches it just right there. With the good old starship enterprise getting destroyed at the end, and Spock not quite his old self, the film ends with a fair amount of uncertainty and clearly setting itself up for the next installment...
A fine film all round, not the greatest Trek film but far from the worst. This is probably the best DVD version available with some excellent special features and a good quality transfer.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4.0 out of 5 stars The best of the odd-numbered Trek films, 15 Jan 2009
This is kind of an underrated Trek film. It picks up the pieces from the end of the last film and suffers perhaps from the fact that the basic storyline was rather inevitable. Basically, the crew go back to the Genesis Planet to find Spock alive. But the plot has plenty of twists and turns along the way to keep things interesting - including the opposition of Starfleet to Kirk's plan, with results in Kirk and co blatantly defying orders, stealing the Enterprise and in so doing becoming outlaws. It's a fun and unexpected turn of events and very well-executed.

The involvement of the Klingons adds an interesting twist (unlike in Star Trek V where they are utterly extraneous), and Christopher Lloyd makes a memorable impression as the villanous Kruge. Once again, the stakes are spelt out as immensely high and, once again, Kirk and co will have to pay dearly in order to achieve victory. The theme of the Kobayashi Maru (an unwinable scenario) again plays itself out, and in order to rescue his dear friend, Kirk inadvertantly must sacrifice not only his ship, but his son. The destruction of the Enterprise (genuinely shocking) and the murder of David (genuinely sad) cast a rather bittersweet tone upon the film, but certainly inject plenty of drama and emotion.

The climatic scenes on the dying Genesis Planet are suitably fiery and although the restoration of Spock's 'katra' on Vulcan seems a little insipid, the film nevertheless holds together nicely. Leonard Nimoy does a more than adequate jon helming the film and once again James Horner provides a rousing and majestic score. Perhaps there's a slight feeling of emptiness at the end, but that seems appropriate given the film's theme of sacrifice. All in all, an enjoyable and engaging follow-up to The Wrath of Khan - it's not quite in the same league as its predecessor, but it's still a very solid entry into the Trek film legacy...and, as has been noted elsewhere, certainly stands as the best of the odd-numbered films (until, let's hope, the new Trek film is released in May 09!)
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Surprisingly enjoyable, 8 April 2008
By 
T. R. Alexander (East Anglia, UK) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (TOP 1000 REVIEWER)    (REAL NAME)   
I seem to remember that the first time I watched this film, many years ago now, I didn't think much of it but now that I have watched it again my opinion of it has much improved. `The Search for Spock' is a direct sequel for the excellent `Wrath of Khan' and while it is definitely not as good as that film, it is definitely a worthy film in its own right. Following the events of `Khan' the crew of the Enterprise return to Space Dock to discover that their ship is to be decommissioned and the are to be reassigned but when events transpire that Spock might not be as dead as was thought, the crew gamble everything to discover the fate of their lost friend.

While it is true that after the action packed `Wrath of Khan' this film does lack something in the excitement department, this is not what the film is really for. This film is meant to be about the close bond between the principle characters and in my view it does this far better than any of the other Trek films. Christopher Lloyd always gives a good performance and his portrayal of the Klingon Captain wishing to learn of the Genesis project is a highlight of the film. As I have already stated the film is something of a letdown in the action stacks but this doesn't make it a bad film and it is a truly enjoyable, if emotional film.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4.0 out of 5 stars Enterprising, 30 Dec 2007
By 
Mr. S. Kerfoot (England) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Please forgive the title, it's nearly 2008 and here I am reveiwing a film nearly a quarter of a century old. But that's the point of the reveiw. Star Trek II is of course the best ST film. Star Trek III is however also very good. With a retrospective view, this film, one of the so called poor odd ones in ST cinematography, is very fine indeed.

Does it have the tension of ST II? No. It's a different film entirely, the beautiful score is the exception, flowing seamlessly on. Why it wasn't continued in IV, V and VII I really have no idea. But like ST II, there is action aplenty, more thoughtful moments and yes, some superb special effects.

A film where Kirk and crew steal the Enterprise is never going to be the usual Star Trek. This film has one major plotline. Having read the novel of the film, you'd realise what they had to leave out. And that's the main problem with ST films; running time. However, the acting is better than usual in ST, the production values high and if ST IV hadn't started with the comedy moments as much as it did, ST V and VI would have been better too.

So, if new to Star Trek, watch ST II then this film for the two best films in the cannon.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Best of the odd numbered trek, 29 Feb 2008
By 
T. Williams "Maranatha!" (North West, England) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
I think this film works well as the middle part of the 'trilogy' of Kahn, Search and Voyage (On its own it is nothing more than an expensive TV episode). Despite it being rather flat there are some standout moments - we get to see Spacedock, Excelsior, the Star Trek cantina, the death of Enterprise and the always watchable Christopher Lloyd as Cmdr Kruge. 6/10.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 26 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

Star Trek III: The Search for Spock [DVD]
Star Trek III: The Search for Spock [DVD] by Leonard Nimoy (DVD - 2009)
£5.75
In stock
Add to basket Add to wishlist
Only search this product's reviews