Customer Reviews


32 Reviews
5 star:
 (19)
4 star:
 (8)
3 star:
 (4)
2 star:    (0)
1 star:
 (1)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


11 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Pointless Nostalgic
This album is extremely versatile and highlights Culums vocal talents. In particular the cover of Radioheads 'High and Dry' which has a sweet and soulful touch in contrast to 'It ain't necessarily so' which for me is just waiting to be pumped up for a live performance.
I am more of a fan of the original songs and feel 'Pointless Nostalgic' is one of the most...
Published on 15 Oct 2002 by ponce1980

versus
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Classy Debut From Jamie C
An interesting debut album from Mr. Cullum.
There are the usual takes on the standards which go down well though it has to be said Jamie’s own song writing is not quite the finished article on this album.
The best track by far is his version of Radiohead’s High And Dry, Which was originally on their classic album, The Bends. Jamie C. puts his own...
Published on 11 Dec 2005 by scoon2


‹ Previous | 1 2 3 4 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

11 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Pointless Nostalgic, 15 Oct 2002
This review is from: Pointless Nostalgic (Audio CD)
This album is extremely versatile and highlights Culums vocal talents. In particular the cover of Radioheads 'High and Dry' which has a sweet and soulful touch in contrast to 'It ain't necessarily so' which for me is just waiting to be pumped up for a live performance.
I am more of a fan of the original songs and feel 'Pointless Nostalgic' is one of the most beautiful ballads I have heard over the last year (comparing Cullum to the expertise of Ryan Adams, Coldplay etc.) This is the direction I am hoping Cullum will take, developing his own style which I'm sure will broaden his appeal. I have played the c.d to friends who despise Jazz/Swing and all have found something in the album which they can enjoy.
If artists such as Geoff Gascoigne and Ben Castle are happy to share a stage with this artist then surely a successful future beckons. The next album is crucial, if the same feeling I get from listening to 'Pointless Nostalgic' can be recreated in future songs then he deserves everything he is rewarded with, the lifestyle, the money, the girls etc.
The talent of Jamie Cullum can only be totally recognised if you are to witness his performance live, so keep checking the website and go and watch wherever and whenever you can.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


20 of 21 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars grown up Robbie Williams meets diminutive Frank Sinatra, 23 Mar 2003
By 
Grant Westall-Reece (London, United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Pointless Nostalgic (Audio CD)
A year ago I bought the Robbie Williams old song compilation album (can't recall the title - "Swing while you're something") and I liked it. Not too heavy, a little tongue in cheek and easy listening.
Jamie Cullum's latest release now makes me realised that Robbie was just playing at being a grown up. With a combination of his own material and some clever adaptations of the great classics this is a superb album which demonstrates Jamie's mellow but strong and crisp voice. Always in control, each word is sung with meaning. A whole mix of Sinatra, Nat King Cole, Dean Martin, Bing Crosby and even a touch of Stevie Wonder.
Buy it NOW. I guarantee you'll be following this young man's meteoric rise in the coming months....
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Amazing Talent!, 1 May 2003
This review is from: Pointless Nostalgic (Audio CD)
A fantastic and refreshing musical masterpiece! The talents of this young man have gone unnoticed for far too long he is a musical genius destined to go far. Pointless Nostalgic is a contemporary and distinctive album incorporating the best sounds of jazz with a modern twist. This album contains the perfect combination of up beat tracks and classic ballads plus an outstanding cover of Radioheads High and Dry, which just blew me away. Do not be without this album it is an absolute must for anyone’s C.D collection.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An Exciting Debut Release, 2 Oct 2002
By 
Mr. A. Day "CornishHobbit" (Cornwall) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Pointless Nostalgic (Audio CD)
Jamie Cullums first set a brilliant mix of standard songs with original compositions and contemporary songs.
His vocal is smooth and toned to the music.
Coupled with his infectuous piano playing and the guesting musicians each piece is an accomplished track that will have you yearning for more
Do not get put off by the jazz theme, this CD is meaningful and has a style and tone that is now and is so awesome that you will be playing for many years to come.
Do not be without this.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Simply amazing!!!, 24 Oct 2004
By 
Melanie Beale (Taunton, Somerset, United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Pointless Nostalgic (Audio CD)
Wow! I thought that Twentysomething was good, but that is nothing on this album. If you enjoyed the style and energy of the music in Twentysomething you'll love this album. I can't turn it off. Jamie Cullum delivers again!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


13 of 14 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars watch this space..., 10 Oct 2002
By 
P S Hedley (Oxford United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Pointless Nostalgic (Audio CD)
A must for anyone interested in vocal jazz, particularly as there aren't too many male jazz vocalists around at the moment. Surrounded by some fine instrumentalists, Jamie is impressive to say the least. A stunning debut disc. Every track is noticeably original and musically rewarding, most notably his own compositions (of which there are 2 on the album). If you like this, go and see him live - it's even better.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars a new star on the horizon, 2 Oct 2002
By 
Videl Bar-Kar (London, United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Pointless Nostalgic (Audio CD)
This is so much more than just another jazz record. Jamie Cullum is truely a star in the making. His voice swings effortlessly in the uptempo numbers (reminiscient of Mark Murphy in his early prime) and draws you into the ballads with natural phrasing and a refreshing emotional honesty. The choice of material is spot on (a mixture of standards, a beautiful Radiohead cover, two originals) and the band swings like a mutha! You get the feeling that Cullum is not just a great singer/pianist, but a born entertainer - I wouldn't be surprised if he goes a long way.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


38 of 43 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Lookin' good, 16 Nov 2002
By 
M. M. D. Holman (London) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Pointless Nostalgic (Audio CD)
There can be little doubt that the career of Jamie Cullum is one to watch. Appearances at numerous London venues since summer 2002 reflect the faith of backers and bookers in both his performance and his promise - and that includes two solo slots at the 606 Club in less than four months: a real accolade. Now this album, his first commercial outing but not his debut recording, gives a wider audience the chance of catching a rising wave, and the investment will be worth it. Cullum sings and plays the songs he selects, including his own sharp material, with a warm voice and a cool head for making even familiar material sound new again. He may become the leading British male vocal presence in jazz venues in the coming decade, in which case, in a few years' time, we'll be nostalgic for this early offering, but not pointlessly. Give it for Christmas.
What Cullum does best here is contemporary or recent material. With his brother, he contributes two new songs, including the title track, which put a useful new songwriter on the scene. The Radiohead "High and Dry" is a good cover as much for the more intimate arrangement for piano, bass and drums, as for Cullum's mellifluous vocals; it's easily susceptible to Cullum's light jazz take. On these tracks, his vocal influences (especially the sometimes distracting shadow of Harry Connick) are less pronounced and somehow you feel you are hearing the real McCoy. Here, as elsewhere, he's supported by players with whom his studio rapport is apparent; Geoff Gascoyne(bass)and Sebastiaan de Krom (drums) stand out in great company.
The album also has what makes the new crop of recordings by younger jazz vocalists so rewarding. (You see it with Ian Shaw, Claire Martin, Trudy Kerr, Liz Fletcher and others in Britain in whose company Cullum will belong.) The repertoire spans at least three generations - from Gershwin to Monk to Radiohead - and shows once again that contemporary jazz musicians care for and are immersed in today's well-written songs as well as their medium's sparkling back-catalogue. And Cullum treats the standards robustly, like a man who's lifted the musical bonnet on this one and seen what the melody can do. The Gershwins' "It ain't necessarily so" gets a sound going over, and so does the lovely Vernon Duke melody "I can't get started". On ballads, as much as when he's up tempo, he's not put off by the thumb prints of greater singers which cover the score. So he seeks his own meaning in "In the wee small hours of the morning", not unduly deterred that Sinatra's sleepless eyes blinked heartachingly through this one 47 years ago.
What prevents me from adding a fifth star to what is a really accomplished recording are two reservations. The first is that to be really top-notch, his interpretations need greater depth - it would, for instance, have made a better job of Johnny Mandel's terrific "A time for love"; this track and Bob Dorough's now-oft-sung "Devil may care" (not Harry Warren's as stated on the sleeve) are a bit routine. And the second is that Cullum has, with his prodigious talent at 23, already reached a crossroad and the route he'll take is not entirely clear. One way is real, unique jazz quality to compete in time with, say, Kurt Elling's or Ian Shaw's; in the other lies that phenomenon where a great voice blunts its edge on mainstream commercial success. (Is this happening to Diana Krall?) The two seldom seem to co-exist, and there's a little bit here of that ambiguity. Jamie's own wry lyric declares "I want to be a popstar". I think his tongue was in his cheek.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Classy Debut From Jamie C, 11 Dec 2005
By 
scoon2 "scoon2" (Scotland) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)   
This review is from: Pointless Nostalgic (Audio CD)
An interesting debut album from Mr. Cullum.
There are the usual takes on the standards which go down well though it has to be said Jamie’s own song writing is not quite the finished article on this album.
The best track by far is his version of Radiohead’s High And Dry, Which was originally on their classic album, The Bends. Jamie C. puts his own mark all over it and it almost comes over like a new song, a quite fantastic cover-version.
The album, however, has tracks that do sound quite ‘samey’ and the whole thing is not as slick and polished as his two subsequent ‘big label’ albums.
Overall though, this is a really enjoyable collection which introduced us to the great potential that was soon going to bear fruit.
It clocks in at fifty-five minutes long.
A decent way to spend an hour.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


15 of 17 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars .....simply the best modern male Jazz vocalist of our time!, 24 May 2003
By A Customer
This review is from: Pointless Nostalgic (Audio CD)
This guy is on the verge of becoming very successful indeed!
If you enjoyed the simplicity and beauty of 'Norah Jones' last album you will love this album with a passion.
In my opinion he is simply the best modern male Jazz vocalist I have heard......and he's only 23 years old!!
His voice shows amazing maturity and depth. Surely it's not possible for someone who is so young to have so much talent.
The title track 'Pointless Nostalgic' (co-written by the man himself) is great. I'm certain from this track alone that there will be plenty more excellent songs in the pipeline.
Good luck to him. Not that he needs it.... he recently signed a very big record contract with a major label.
Expect BIG things!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 2 3 4 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

Pointless Nostalgic
Pointless Nostalgic by Jamie Cullum
Buy MP3 Album£5.49
Add to wishlist See buying options
Only search this product's reviews