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4.1 out of 5 stars
Inkheart [DVD]
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22 of 24 people found the following review helpful
Mortimer "Mo" Folchart (Brendan Fraser) makes his living as a repairer of old books. He and his daughter Meggie (Eliza Bennett) travel all over Europe stopping in antiquated bookshops. And in each one, Mo searches the entire collection for one book in particular, Inkheart.

Mo finally finds a copy, but just after he does, he is confronted by Dustfinger (Paul Bettany), one of the characters from the novel. Mo manages to run away, and he and Meggie flee to great aunt Elinor's (Helen Mirren) in Italy. But they aren't safe there. Dustfinger appears again, says he is working with Capricorn (Andy Serkis) now, and kidnaps the three of them.

Only when the group reaches Capricorn's castle does Mo explain what is happening. Seems he is a Silvertongue and has the ability to read characters into and out of books. Dustfinger and Capricorn are characters in Inkheart, but Mo wants to find a copy for a very personal reason. What do the characters want? Can Mo and his family escape?

The previews for this movie made it seem like I would love it. Heck, as a reader, the premise of characters traveling between a novel and the real world appeals to me. But the movie just seemed off to me.

And it's mainly a matter of expectations. I expected lots of references to characters from famous novels. There are some, but the main focus is on the characters from the book in question. I expected a fast paced action story. Yes, there were action scenes, but there were also long passages between them where the story moved forward rather slowly.

I did find myself getting lost in the story. The acting was top notch, and the special effects were jaw dropping. Heck, even the cinematography held impressive shots of lakes and castles.

A word of warning to parents. There are some frightening creatures and intense action sequences, including the climax. You might want to preview it before your let your young kids watch it, especially those who frighten easily.

I half expected to rush out and read the books after I caught this in the theater, and that still hasn't happened. If you watch the film, you'll enjoy it, but there's not reason to rush out to do so.
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42 of 46 people found the following review helpful
I saw this at the cinema, and I couldn't take my eyes off the screen during the whole feature.

Of course it not EXACTLY like the book. It has taken parts out, switched things around, but all book-to-movie adaptations do that.

It is purely incredible to watch, the characters are perfect, and the special effects are brilliant.

As a huge fan of the Inkworld trilogy, I am definately NOT dissapointed with this film. And am now waiting impatiently for the DVD.
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31 of 35 people found the following review helpful
on 23 April 2009
This is a neatly made, solid little movie, very competent, well acted, capable of holding a grown up's attention. I have got (had) to see a lot of these fantasy type films recently, and after the Harry Potters it holds its head up with the best of them. It is more coherent and whole as a story, with better changes in dramatic pace, and characterization than the let-down Golden Compass, say - and absolutely head and shoulders above the utterly dire "Secret of Moonacre" and Bridge to Tarabithia. Better than Five Children and It, and the Water Horse. Better than Nanny McPhee, which was OK itself. It really stands the test, actually. Oh, and the main child character is a girl.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
on 27 December 2010
This is a really amazing film and so very clever the way it weaves several well known stories and the characters from those stories into the story itself. It's not often that I will quite willingly watch what I consider to be a 'childrens' film but my 11 year old daughter and I both love this film and will watch it again and again - and I keep buying additional copies for other people as presents - that's how much I like it!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
VINE VOICEon 27 July 2009
I'm a total sucker for fairy tales and the like, so Inkheart appealed to me from the off. Based on the novel by Cornelia Funke, Inkheart is about a man who brings characters out of books when he reads. Sounds great, right? Unfortunately, when "Silvertongue," as he's known, reads people out of books, someone or something goes back in. Who or what, he has no control over.

Mo Folchart (played by Brendan Frasier) discovers his gift when reading to his young daughter from a book called Inkheart. An innocent enough pastime, but when Mo starts to hear voices, he falters but then carries on regardless. Suddenly, he's presented with the very character he's just been reading about. Confusion ensues, and when things calm down, Mo realises that his wife Resa (Sienna Guillory), has gone. It takes him a while to work out what happened, but it's already too late - the book has been taken so he can't read her back out. In another stroke of bad luck the novel has been out of print for many, many years and so copies are difficult to come by. Regardless, Mo is determined to get the book, and his wife, back. So he devotes his life to locating another copy of the book and refuses to read aloud until then.

This is the story of Mo's search for the book and what happens when he finds it. Because of course, it's not going to be as simple as just reading Resa back out, is it? It wouldn't be a story then...

With an all-star cast, Inkheart promises much. And in my opinion, it delivers. It's not aimed at adults, so it's not particularly dark or scary - but if you just take it for what it is, you'll be entertained. It's an interesting story, well-acted, good special effects and with a light sprinkling of humour. You could do much worse on a quiet night in. It just depends what you're into. If you like folk and fairy tales, you'll likely enjoy this.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
`Inkheart' is a pretty decent fantasy adventure about a man (called a Silvertongue) who can read books aloud and make then come alive. He did exactly this many years ago and lost his wife into a book, whilst setting some rather unsavoury characters free. As you can imagine this would lead to many adventures and how they are resolved is where this film leads. There are numerous literary references throughout this film, from Peter Pan to The Wizard of Oz, Huckleberry Finn to The Minotaur and more besides and this aspect makes the film more magical as the main characters interact with characters from classic fiction of the past. Andy Serkis plays an excellent baddie and the strong fantasy elements make the battle between good and evil all the more potent. Having not read the original book I came to his film with no preconceptions and also had the luxury of not being disappointed by any changes to the storyline. As a stand alone film this makes good viewing and just over 100 minutes of fantasy adventure suitable for all the family. I have seen better fantasy films (`Stardust' being one of them) but this still isn't bad and it is a good way to spend an afternoon. Worth a viewing.

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54 of 63 people found the following review helpful
on 8 February 2009
Brendan Fraser's been having a rough old time of it lately. Both The Mummy 3 and Journey To The Centre Of The Earth were shocking awful. Really, really woeful. And it's a shame because Brendam Fraser is actually very good, and seems to be painting himself into a bit of a corner. (Look at his performaces in Scrubs and The Passion of Darkly Noon to see how talented he really is.)

The trailers for Inkheart make it seem extraordinary - like a The Neverending Story for the noughties - and while it lives up to its promise visually, it falls a little flat elsewise. I've not read the books, and am beginning to understand they have a huge following, so if you're a fan of the books and want a review that will be able to contrast and compare, hopefully one of the other reviews will be able to do that.

Back to Fraser: he's very good. We've grown accustomed to seeing him in comedy roles, and I can't remember him smiling a single time here. Along with him the cast comprises of Paul Bettany, Eliza Bennett, Helen Mirren, Andy Serkis and Jim Broadbent - it's an exceedingly British cast - and all play their parts well.

The problem is, aside from the astoundingly good visuals, it's all a little listless. You keep expecting something amazing to happen and it never does. If you've seen Jumper, you'll know what I mean. It always seems to be on the very precipice of something exciting taking place, but it never does; like being on the brink of a sneeze for an hour and a half. It's a little confusing and disappointing.

Fraser is a "silver tongue" - someone who, when he reads a loud, brings the characters into the real world. Reading Rapunzel makes Rapunzel appear, etc. The only problem is, when someone is brought across to our world, someone disappears into theirs. The universe, I suppose, seeks to balance itself out. The person who disappeared into the other world is Risa, Fraser's wife, and the mother of his daughter, Meggie.

She disappeared when Meggie was 3, and he has been surreptitiously searching for her ever since. You would think that would involve huge amounts of adventure and excitement, however, much of the film takes place in the front room of an old castle somewhere. With every fantasy world out there to choose from, setting the bulk of it all in one dusty old room seems like a strange decision to make. And that may well be why the film never really takes off.

It is not, however, a bad film. It's jolly entertaining, and were my expectations not so high, I perhaps would have enjoyed it more. And, again, the effects really are excellent. Having looked up Inkheart as a novel, have discovered it's a trilogy. The film is good enough to make me want to see the other 2 brought to the screen, but if the Inkworld books are as good as they sound, the film-makers may have to do more to make sure the next two do the books justice.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 4 February 2010
This comes across as children's story where you read a book and soon as you speak the words, you suddenly see the book has come to life with the characters from a book suddenly appear in our world and hoping that the reader can take them back.
For one father and daughter who has this talent find they have to find wife/mother who suddenly went into the book, for as one item or person comes out, one goes back.
they have to find before the main enemy throws all copies of the book Inkheart away forever. The author even gets in the act to help near the end to try to everyone back and help get rid of the enemy forever.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 20 July 2010
I really enjoyed this movie! I went to see it at the cinema and it was great! A girl called meggie loves books. And whenever her father reads one to her, something in the story comes to life! Soon Meggie and her father fall into a deadly trap as a greedy villain attemps to use this power for evil. The book Inkheart perticularly grabbs his attention. He tries to welcome a dark monster back but Meggie manages to stop him! Its such a fantastic film, though some acting could have been better. 9/10!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 20 May 2009
Inkheart is a film based on the book about a man hunting for a book. This is no ordinary book though and leads to another world. All sorts of people live in this world. He is looking for his wife in this world.

This film is aimed at all ages and is a great family film. The graphics are very good. I gave it a 3 as I thought that the plot wasn't very exciting.

I think if you enjoyed the film The Secret of Moonacre or Bedtime stories you will enjoy this.

***
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