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12 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Please-ing, indeed
This is the first, and considered by many fans and non-fans, to be the quint-essential Pet Shop Boys album. Anyone familiar with the popular music of the 1980s will know the dominant track on the CD, West End Girls. Still considered their greatest hit, the Pet Shop Boys capitalised on the synthesizer and sample-heavy sound conjured up for this song by producing a slick...
Published on 28 Sept. 2003 by Kurt Messick

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0 of 9 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Please - pet shop boys - cd
This is the Pet Shop Boys' first album, and their weakest. Truely, it's hard to believe. Weak songs, that have no blue-eyed-soul. If you want to listen to the best album of the 80's, get Actually. All the songs are great, with great depth, and spirit.
Published on 4 April 2010 by John Hamill


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12 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Please-ing, indeed, 28 Sept. 2003
By 
Kurt Messick "FrKurt Messick" (London, SW1) - See all my reviews
(HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)    (REAL NAME)   
This is the first, and considered by many fans and non-fans, to be the quint-essential Pet Shop Boys album. Anyone familiar with the popular music of the 1980s will know the dominant track on the CD, West End Girls. Still considered their greatest hit, the Pet Shop Boys capitalised on the synthesizer and sample-heavy sound conjured up for this song by producing a slick London-based video that catapulted the PSB into the limelight around the world for the next several years.
The music of the Pet Shop Boys defies easy explanation. The lyrics are witty and urbane, very much a product of the disco and consumer-big-money culture of the 1980s. Songs like Opportunities/Let's Make Lots of Money became a sort of capitalist anthem, spawning two different video versions and countless remixes for the disco environments.
Taking a cue from the popular television of the time, the song Suburbia has a piano overlay that sounds similar to the then massively-popular Eastenders, and the lyrics recount a East End-esque storyline which sparks familiarity with those immersed in the pop culture.
The song Love Comes Quickly highlights both synthesizer effects and masking as well as simple and elegant poetic lyric. No base or screaming lines in this disco, no banal or forced words simply to serve as fronting for a drum-machine-produced rhythm, this song perhaps shows the Pet Shop Boys at their early height in development of words to music (that was finally fully developed in the album Behaviour).
Two other songs of note on this introductory album include the first track, Two Divided By Zero, which has a simple introduction and simplistic development that ends up gradually increasing in sound complexity while the sense of 'what does this song mean?' continues to agitate (for the mathematically inclined, anything divided by zero becomes problematic). Tied together with the lyric in Opportunities: 'I doctored in mathematics/I could've been a don', the nuances are subtle and interesting. The almost triumphant yet existential-based Tonight is Forever generates images of glory and failure, pleading and confidence, subtle and direct, an interesting paradox.
Neil Tennant and Chris Lowe have continued their collaboration (with the great assistance of many others) to produce ever more complex and interesting albums, not all of which have been successful, commercially or artistically. While Please is not their best album, it is certain a classic, and very much the seed from which all the rest of their sound derives (a dialogue lyric on a later album states 'you've both made such a little go a very long way'). Everything on any future album of the Pet Shops Boys is present in some form here. A must have for any collector of the Pet Shop Boys or of 1980s pop culture and music.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Classic Piece of Brilliance, 5 Dec. 2001
By 
N R HARRIS (West Midlands, United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Please (Audio CD)
Yep, Please was & still is everything that the Pet Shop Boys started out with to fufil their promise of International Stardom. an excellent album with some high energy beats, mixed with a few ballads. I am a big Pet Shop Boys fan, and still I continue to listen to this album with great enjoyment & the sound that still isn't out of place with today's styles.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Rerelease to end all rereleases!, 9 May 2001
By 
Gabby "Gabby" (Birmingham, Warwickshire United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
"Please" was the first PSB album, and in itself is a rare gem of classy, moody tracks far removed from the "Go West" anthems of recent years. However, this re-release (along with their next 5 studio albums) comes with a new 2nd CD with B-sides, unreleased or until now never released on CD tracks and remixes. This makes it one of the most worthwhile times to buy PSB albums as you can not only sample their old material if you are unfamiliar with it, but also hear their much rarer output over the last 15 years some of which is superior to their better known singles. "Please" is much more raw than their later albums, but doesn't carry too much of that embarrassingly 80's sound. These are songs that are still strong today, and as relevent as ever. This is a classic album not only of the 80's but of the 20th century.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An incredibly accomplished debut, 27 Sept. 2008
By 
L. Green "Feltano" (London, UK) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Please (Audio CD)
Barcode: 0077774627122

It only takes one listen to the likes of West End Girls to know you're onto something special with the Pet Shop Boys' debut album - Please. With it's dreamy, melancholy synths, the single at once perfectly captures the duo's sound as well as the mood of the time. This theme is continued in Opportunities, Tennant's typically witty lyrics offering an amusing take on the capitalism of the 80s.

While the production might sound sparse compared to the sweeping orchestral indulgences of future Pet Shop Boys albums, all the crucial ingredients are here, the fact that all four of the albums' singles placed in the UK top 20 testament to that. The songs are catchy and most importantly, not only the sound of two people enjoying themselves immesnely, but also pushing themselves to acheieve the best possible result.

Love Comes Quickly is a beautiful ballad, Tennant's spoken word intro of 'Sooner or later this happens to everyone' leading into one of his best vocal performances. Please works so well as an album because it flows so masterfully between upbeat tracks and more gentler material like this, showcasing the duo's skill at both. Throughout it all, the sheer poeticism of the lyrics holds true, delivered against beautiful synth backgrounds.

The version of Suburbia on here is interesting, far removed from the version released as a single. This one is more stripped back, synth heavy and ultimately lacks compared to the epic masterpiece that is the single version, but the song is still a joy to listen to, the poignancy of its message reinforced by an instantly memorable melody.

In regards to the album tracks, Please is pleasantly consistent, opening track Two Divided By Zero in particular being a highlight. And as the Pet Shop Boys have always strived, pop melodies are combined perfectly with more adventurous elements, such as the sampling of the Speak & Spell toy in the opening track and the footsteps in West End Girls.

Other highlights include Tonight Is Forever while album closer Why Don't We Live Together explores a more conventional disco flavour reminscent of some of Madonna's early material such as Holiday. Later Tonight is the album's 'synth-lite' moment, an enchanting piano ballad that despite its short length is surprisingly moving.

Please serves as a perfect introduction to the Pet Shop Boys' music, the duo already showcasing a variety of sounds that the duo would go on to develop into a diverse but continually consistent catalogue.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Brilliant!, 18 Jun. 2001
By A Customer
Classic album, now remastered with beautiful packaging and excellent sleeve notes. A great bonus CD with several re-mixes and unreleased tracks. Even if you are just a small fan of the PSB, this is an essential purchase !!
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Pets Arrive !!!!!!, 5 Aug. 2010
This review is from: Please (Audio CD)
This album was for it's time,(and still is), fantastic!

It was perfect to announce their arrival to the world and would form a sequence of great material from the late eighties through to the nineties and beyond.

If you think they are just all pretty synth ditty's, try listening to some of the lyrics : some of the most thought provoking and cutting words around.

You wait till later, 'till later tonight.............
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Tennant and lowes Masterpiece, 27 Feb. 2011
This review is from: Please (Audio CD)
I adore this album this is without a doubt the greatest PSB album ever
two divided by zero - great song for tavelling and just a stylishly cool song
suburbia - this is the original version i think and its more stripped down and simple yet very effective, incredible
west end girls - wow...its impossible to explain how amazing this song is
Why dont we live together - "there comes a time in everyones life, when all the parties every night, there not enough, you want something more...I want you...I want you" and after that line I am in love with Neil tennant, this song is a great example of just how good Tennants vocals are, they are sensational and this song shows them off brilliantly (best song on album) Every PSB fan must own this album.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Pet Shop Boys, Debuts, 24 Feb. 2013
By 
Autonome (London United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Please (Audio CD)
This is the Debut album of PSBs but the two artists were by no means debutantes when they recorded it. Neil Tennant and Chris Lowe started making music together in 1981 and were "educated" in the tricks of the trade by legendary producer Bobby Orlando in New York City in 1984. After having released their first version of "West End Girls", the band broke up with Bobby O, Neil went on to take singing lessons to give his voice (and his remarkable, very original tone) new depth and the "reborn" band released a new version of "West End Girls" in October 1985, their single "Love comes quickly" in February 1986, both being included in this Debut LP, "Please" (released in March 1986).
Because the two artists were not really beginners (having done the job for almost five years by then), the album sounds amazingly mature and well thought-of. Out of the 10 songs there, one can be critical of one, maybe two tracks but that's about it. The rest is simply exceptional. What makes PSB very special is first, an amazing sense of melody (move on Schubert, Mozart and The Beatles) making the tunes memorable and eternal ("Opportunities", "Later Tonight", "Love comes quickly" and "West End Girls" of course), great arrangements and the overall polish of the production (and here it is clear that the band had not the resource nor the money to be as sophisticated as they would later be). The contagious dance rhythm in "Two divided by zero", "Suburbia" and "Why don't we live together" is also great and one will listen with interest to "Tonight is forever" and compare this draft with the diamond that Neil and Chris will manufacture for Liza Minnelli just three years later - with the same song.
In any case a wonderful, memorable first effort.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Pet Shop Boys, Debuts, 23 Feb. 2013
By 
Autonome (London United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Please (Audio CD)
This is the Debut album of PSBs but the two artists were by no means debutantes when they recorded it. Neil Tennant and Chris Lowe started making music together in 1981 and were "educated" in the tricks of the trade by legendary producer Bobby Orlando in New York City in 1984. After having released their first version of "West End Girls", the band broke up with Bobby O, Neil went on to take singing lessons to give his voice (and his remarkable, very original tone) new depth and the "reborn" band released a new version of "West End Girls" in October 1985, their single "Love comes quickly" in February 1986, both being included in this Debut LP, "Please" (released in March 1986).
Because the two artists were not really beginners (having done the job for almost five years by then), the album sounds amazingly mature and well thought-of. Out of the 10 songs there, one can be critical of one, maybe two tracks but that's about it. The rest is simply exceptional. What makes PSB very special is first, an amazing sense of melody (move on Schubert, Mozart and The Beatles) making the tunes memorable and eternal ("Opportunities", "Later Tonight", "Love comes quickly" and "West End Girls" of course), great arrangements and the overall polish of the production (and here it is clear that the band had not the resource nor the money to be as sophisticated as they would later be). The contagious dance rhythm in "Two divided by zero", "Suburbia" and "Why don't we live together" is also great and one will listen with interest to "Tonight is forever" and compare this draft with the diamond that Neil and Chris will manufacture for Liza Minnelli just three years later - with the same song.
In any case a wonderful, memorable first effort.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Brilliant Blast from the Past, 15 Nov. 1999
By A Customer
This review is from: Please (Audio CD)
This is another tape I used to own which somehow got lost in the transition to compact discs! Thankfully, I found it here and returned it to its rightful place in my collection. This is an absolute 80s classic. The synth sounds are excellent and nobody does it better than the Pet Shop Boys. "West End Girls" is one of the best songs to come out of the 80s and somehow remains cutting edge even today. "Opportunities" and "Love Comes Quickly" are 2 more favourites, but "Suburbia" easily takes the spot as the second best song on the album. A nostalgic trip down the 80s techno road.
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