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18 of 19 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Marooned
This trilogy covers the Doctor's adventures in E-space, a smaller universe accessed by the TARDIS after it accidentally slipped through a CVE. In the first story "Full Circle", Romana has to be taken back to Gallifrey. But following the mishap with the CVE, they end up on Alzarius instead, just as the legendary Mistfall is setting in. This is where we first see the...
Published on 3 Sept. 2003 by Greg Hughes

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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars The E-Space Trilogy. Hmmm...
The E-space trilogy was a series of three seperate adventures linked together into a 12 episode story arc, and came in the middle of Tom Baker's final series as the Doctor.

The three stories contain therein are a mixed bunch. Full circle would have been a decent tale, with some interesting ideas, good supporting cast and an above average script. Trouble is, it...
Published on 30 July 2009 by Victor


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18 of 19 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Marooned, 3 Sept. 2003
This trilogy covers the Doctor's adventures in E-space, a smaller universe accessed by the TARDIS after it accidentally slipped through a CVE. In the first story "Full Circle", Romana has to be taken back to Gallifrey. But following the mishap with the CVE, they end up on Alzarius instead, just as the legendary Mistfall is setting in. This is where we first see the mathematical whiz Adric, who a lot of fans found annoying. I actually liked Adric.
My favourite story out of the trilogy is the middle one, "State of Decay". I found this story quite scary when I first saw it as an impressionable child back in the 1980s. "State of Decay" takes place after "Full Circle" but it was actually filmed before "Full Circle", so strictly speaking this is the first time Adric appears in the show. The setting is quasi-medieval, a backwater planet where peasants toil for the sinister Lords - "The Three Who Rule". For over a thousand years things have been the same. A primitive society where learning is forbidden. The vampire Lords rule from a rocket-shaped Tower which looms over the village. Young people are periodically selected from the village to "serve" the Lords. A band of rebels survives in the wastelands. If you look at this story too closely however, you will find plot holes. For example, Lord Aukon could detect the presence of strong alien minds (the Doctor, Romana and Adric), yet he failed to notice the rebellious streak in Ivo's mind. This is especially disturbing when Aukon said "We have bred dullness, conformity, obedience into those clods for twenty generations." Aukon couldn't locate the rebels' hideout either. Nevertheless, the Doctor is up against a formidable enemy in this adventure. Isn't he always?
The trilogy concludes with "Warriors Gate", where the TARDIS literally lands in the middle of nowhere. To be more precise, the gateway that leads back into N-space (our universe). Slavery is dealt with in this adventure, as the lion-like Tharils are cruelly exploited for their sensitivity to Time. Stephen Gallagher wrote this story. Apparently he was influenced by Joe Haldeman's novel "The Forever War". We see some sophisticated special effects (for 1980) as Biroc's mind forms an animated wireframe image of the TARDIS. Look at his "afterimage" as he runs through the white void.
The E-space trilogy is a strong set of stories. This is also where we say goodbye to Romana and K.9. as they decide to help Biroc and the other Tharils fight slavery. K.9.'s departure was a sad loss for fans, but a blessed relief for the technical crew, who sometimes found the robot dog hard to control. It may sound like a cliche, but after "Warriors Gate" things would never quite be the same.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Doctor Who - The E-Space Trilogy (1980-1981) - When the 4th Doctor says goodbye to Romana and K-9, and hello to Adric, 3 Sept. 2013
This review is from: Doctor Who: The E-Space Trilogy (Full Circle / State of Decay / Warriors' Gate) [DVD] (DVD)
Tom Baker's last series of Doctor Who was the beginning of changes starting with `Full Circle', the third story of the eighteen series when the 4th Doctor (Tom Baker), Romana II (Lalla Ward) and K-9 (voice of John Leeson) meets young mathematic genius `Adric' (Matthew Waterhouse). `Full Circle' is a classic 1980 epic about genetics and evolutions on a whole society have to contend and how species evolve in civilised humanoids. Both main cast and supporting cast work well together, such as James Bree (Nefred), Alan Rowe (Graiff), Leonard Maguire (Draith), Tony Calvin (Dexeter), June Page (Keara), Richard Willis (Varsh, Adric's older rebel brother), Bernard Padden (Tylos), but all acting glories goes to I,Claudius and Inspector Wexford actor George Baker as Login, Keara's worried and concerned father who is scared about his missing and rebellious daughter is outside the 'Staliner', and mistfall has come, and the Marshmen have awakened...

The second story is my favourite `State of Decay', this classic epic is Doctor Who homage to Bram Stoker's `Dracula'. With the vampires `three that rule', I have always have been a huge `Hammer Horror' fan, I am reading `Anno Dracula' by Kim Newman, and I enjoyed the Hinchcliffe and Holmes era of `Doctor Who' who gave Tom Baker his change to shine during 1975 to 1977. I enjoyed the gothic atmosphere in this adventure from the fright villager played with perfection by Clinton Greyn as town leader Ivo, who sadly sees his son taken away by the `Three who Rule' royal guards to scientist and hermit Kalmer played excellently by Arthur Hewlett to the evil Vampires `The Three that Rule' who are played excellently by William Lindsay as `Zargo', Racheal Davies as `Camilla' and special acting glories goes to Emrys James as `Aukon' as his dark eyes as he summons his bats minions. The only niggle is the portray of the great Vampire, it's a pity the DVD didn't have CGI option as it would have been great to have a gothic, giant vampire flying in the sky threatening the 4th Doctor, Romana, K-9 and new companion `Adric'. In my mind a lost opportunity.

The third and final adventure `Warrior's Gate', the 1981 adventure is the swansong for Romana and K-9, and says goodbye to Lalla Ward and John Leeson. It tells the story of slavery and how an alien race `The Tharils' attitude towards other races have changed when the humanoid start enslaving them meaning a timelord or a timelady needs their help to free them. Both humanoids, Clifford Rose (Rorvik) and Kenneth Cope (Packard), and David Weston (Biroc, `the Tharil Leader) all shine in this classic episode.

I would like to give this triple boxset a full `5' stars as it says goodbye to a Timelady and a Tin Dog, and a finally goodbye Tom Baker in his next two stories `The Keeper of Traken' and `Logopolis', but that in the next boxset `New Beginnings'.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A return to form for Doctor Who, 14 Feb. 2013
This review is from: Doctor Who: The E-Space Trilogy (Full Circle / State of Decay / Warriors' Gate) [DVD] (DVD)
After season 17, which featured dodgy scripts, some woeful monsters and many production mishaps, it was clear that Doctor Who was in dire need of a revamp. In Season 18 new producer John Nathan Turner and new script editor Christopher H Bidmead made sure this happened. These three stories are all excellent examples of Doctor Who's early 1980's renaissance.

Full Circle is a clever story with some convincing monsters, superb direction from Peter Grimwade and some lovely location filming. Some of the acting, particularly from the young characters, isn't brilliant. This is the weakest story of the trilogy and yet it is still well above average.

State of Decay is a superb story from veteran Doctor Who writer Terrance Dicks. The music is wonderful, there are some great guest performances and some surprisingly impressive model shots. Admittedly the manifestation of the Great Vampire isn't great and the execution of the ambitious climax to the story is a bit flat but almost everything else about this story is very enjoyable.

Warriors Gate is a stunning piece of television; It looks fantastic and is brilliantly acted by virtually the entire cast. It's one of the most complex Doctor Who stories ever and one of the most often criticised aspects of story is that some plot points aren't explained as well as they should be, but really this is only a very minor complaint that does almost nothing to detract from this story's excellence. The direction courtesy of Paul Joyce is also breathtaking; he may have caused some tension on the set but looking at the end result shows that it was worth it. Romana also gets a great departure.

This is possibly the best classic Doctor Who box set ever as there is no weak link, all three stories are strong.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Real science, great fiction, 30 Nov. 2011
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This review is from: Doctor Who: The E-Space Trilogy (Full Circle / State of Decay / Warriors' Gate) [DVD] (DVD)
A very good value way of getting three stories that at worse are above average, and at best are quite brilliant at times. Production values are elevated from the three prior seasons. Tom Baker is still strong as the Doctor, although appropriately jovial, depending on the script writer.

The set is made up of three stories, which were only "linked" as the "E-Space Trilogy" many years after transmission. There is a connection - in the first story they fall into an alternative universe, and by the end of Warriors' Gate have returned to the original universe. There are consequences all round to the falling into and coming out of the E-Space (as opposed to N-Space) universe.

Full Circle may be written by an 18 year old, but wow, what a piece of insightful writing for someone so young; whilst script editor Chris Bidmead may have helped somewhat there is still a huge amount of clever writing by the original author both in terms of concepts and in characterisation. State of Decay is by Terrance Dicks, who wrote several stories, but is perhaps best remembered as either the script editor for the Pertwee era, or as the writer of so many Doctor Who novels in the 1970s and 1980s. Warriors's Gate is written by Stephen Gallagher a famous name perhaps more synonymous with horror/fantasy writing. All three scripts are very well written and fresh. All feature some guest actors who are well known from other programmes, such as George Baker in Full Circle, and Clifford Rose and Kenneth Cope in Warriors' Gate.

Three very good Doctor Who stories at a very good price is worthy of 5 stars, however, not all fans like 1980s Doctor Who, believing, for example, Adric to be the worst companion, which is very hard to see in these stories as he is still very amiable. Lalla Ward as the second Romana is a wonderful companion and very sad to see her go, but a very appropriate ending for her, bearing in mind the back-story.

Well, in 2011 what single description can we add to summarise The "E-Space Trilogy"? Perhaps they are the best three consecutive 1980s stories; they are certainly all well above average; they embrace and enhance the very thing Doctor Who is about; quality science fiction, of which the E-Space trilogy yields in bucket loads. One of the best, if not the best classic Doctor Who DVD sets.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars The E-Space Trilogy. Hmmm..., 30 July 2009
By 
Victor (Hull, England) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Doctor Who: The E-Space Trilogy (Full Circle / State of Decay / Warriors' Gate) [DVD] (DVD)
The E-space trilogy was a series of three seperate adventures linked together into a 12 episode story arc, and came in the middle of Tom Baker's final series as the Doctor.

The three stories contain therein are a mixed bunch. Full circle would have been a decent tale, with some interesting ideas, good supporting cast and an above average script. Trouble is, it introduces Adric, the companion we all love to hate. On the rare occassion I can see through the red mist that descends whenever he's on the screen it's not a bad series.

The second story - state of decay - is good, but is unfortunately vastly overshadowed by the big gothic tales, such as 'Talons of Weng-Chiang', 'Terror of Fang Rock' and 'The Brain of Morbius'. This seems a pale shodow when compared to those earlier triumphs. It's not bad though, and the central premise is one that I've always quite liked.

The final story - Warriors Gate - is one of those wierd stories, where you have to watch it about 15 times to figure out what the script writers had in mind. And even then you're still not sure you've got it. It marks the departure of Lalla Ward, and my favourite companion K-9, in slightly rushed scenes at the end. The confusing plot aside, this story does stand out for one reason - the special effects and set design. The whole thing is very imaginatively done, one of the best in the whole series for that sort of thing.

The central premise lonking all three stories is also a bit confusing at first. I'm still not convinced I understand it. It doesn't matter much in the forst two stories, but is important in the third, where things get so confusing I usually give up on what passes for the plot and just enjoy the photography.

So, three stories, all with good and bad points, so a pretty average 3*. All of them watchable, but no stand out classics here. The DVD's come with the usual excellent range of commentaries and extras, but even after these I'm still not entirely sure what the script writers were on about....
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12 of 13 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A wonderful Box-Set of 3 videos with Adric, Romana and K9, 23 Feb. 2002
In the first video "Full Circle" the Doctor and his companions Romana an K9 arrive on the planet Alzarius not there intended destination as the Tardis was knocked off course and is now in Exo-Space a completely different universe, there is plenty of intrigue in this appealing story which also marks the beginning of the companion Adric (Mathew Waterhouse).
In video 2 "State of Decay" the Doctor meets the Timelords greatest foe the vampires who were banished into exo-space by Rassilon himself. This story is one of my favourites as there is such a great dark secret laying underneath the tower ruled by the three.
In the last story "Warriors Gate" the Tardis is brought to a place by the Tharils who are a being hunted down and enslaved. Can the Doctor help? You'll just have to watch and see.
This story also marks the end of the much loved companions K9 who first appeared in "The Invisible Enemy" and the female timelord Romana who first appeared in the episode "The Ribos Operation" in the "Key To Time Season" it is a very momentus episode and so I would urge anyone to watch it, as well as the two episodes leading up to it.
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32 of 36 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The Bidmead/JN-T vision - for better and worse..., 9 Feb. 2009
By 
John (London, London United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Doctor Who: The E-Space Trilogy (Full Circle / State of Decay / Warriors' Gate) [DVD] (DVD)
Chris Bidmead (who wrote Tom Baker's swan-song Logopolis) as script-editor, & John Nathan-Turner, as producer of Doctor Who, favoured a return to 'hard' sci-fi (that is, the foregrounding in the narrative of quite elaborate & difficult scientific concepts such as Charged Vacuum Emboitments) for Tom Baker's final season. Hence this 'trilogy' - very loosely framed by the Doctor & Romana becoming trapped in E-Space, a smaller universe somehow external to our own, & having to escape from it back into our N-(normal)-Space. I'm ambivalent about the merits of this approach. The final story in the trilogy, Warriors' Gate, has, to my mind, a near-incomprehensible denoument, and throughout lacks proper attention to the basic story-telling. Script-editor, writer and director all laugh on the commentary-track about how now it's on dvd you can watch it over & over & perhaps finally understand it, but the fact is that it barely makes sense, & less chat about CVEs and the like, and more attentio to dramatic & psychological density and depth, would have produced a more gripping result.

Interesting, in State of Decay, the vampire story, Bidmead rewrote Terrance Dicks' script massively (to Dicks' chagrin) in line with his more science-fictional vision and the director, who'd originally agreed to direct the story because of its Hammer-Horror gothicism, refused to do the job unless they went back to Dicks' original script, which they did - a singularly rare occurrence in television or film. Dicks does concede that Bidmead contributed the entertaining rocket denoument.

Everyone is quite candid about Tom Baker & Lalla Ward's tempestuous off-screen relationship, pointing out that on a bad day Tom refuses to look at Lalla in their scenes together. Lalla is fairly cold about Adric as a character, & I did feel a bit sorry for Matthew Waterhouse being thrown into such an emotionally-wrought setting. He himself in his interviews is quite endearing and unpretentious.

Rewatching the stories I actually enjoyed all of them: all contain nice ideas and the odd sharp line and image, and Lalla's outfits are rightly celebrated. But I found the pace and use of language stodgy by comparison with the Graham Williams/Douglas Adams stories. I was also struck by the similarity of set-ups in all three stories. In Full Circle the characters moulder away in an endless round of pointless maintenance chores on a crashed Star-liner. In State of Decay the vampiritic Lords moulder away in courtly parasitism in the ruins of a crashed rocket. In Warriors' Gate the crew moulder away on a crashed space-ship unable to escape the inertia of their situation. Perhaps this reflects that late-70s sensibility that Britain itself was mouldering away inertly, the crashed ruin of its imperial glory...

I like actors, so didn't want to find Adric such an unappealing character on re-viewing his debut, but I just don't take to Matthew Waterhouse's performance. But then I also feel he wasn't really given a proper character to play. Nathan-Turner's original concept was of an 'Artful Dodger' - but then he cast the utterly public-schoolish Waterhouse - who wondered after being offered the part if he was going to be asked to affect a Cockney accent. Certainly there seems to have been little attempt to integrate him psychologically into the trilogy - Tom & Lalla don't become stand-in parents or older siblings or scary magical figures to Adric: everyone just blodges through the dialogue, which is somewhat randomly assigned.

Everyone seems to hate poor old K-9, who is rather side-lined here.

Overall, I enjoyed the E-Space Trilogy but feel that the price of pushing up the level of scientific conceptualisation proved to be letting the psychological maturity of character & dramatic situation deteriorate.

Interestingly, despite a certain amount of technobabble, the next story, The Keeper of Traken, worked almost entirely as a fable and has almost no scientific feel to it at all: it's only with Tom Baker's final story that Bidmead gets to fully express his vision for the show - & does so very effectively, I think.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A curiosity of stories..., 25 May 2014
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Geoffrey Cole (London) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Doctor Who: The E-Space Trilogy (Full Circle / State of Decay / Warriors' Gate) [DVD] (DVD)
Full Circle, State of Decay & Warrior's Gate.

Tearing my hair out with ambivalence.
The Tom Baker era is the most frustrating; the change in producers and the wildly varying vision for the programme, the change in Tom Baker the human, the pointless robot dog, the giant top-heavy burgundy costume from which Mr. Baker only just seems to be able to gasp for air. Urgh... Those bloody question marks!!!

Yet these stories are interesting, marking as they do the gradual procession toward Logopolis.
Here comes Adric, there goes Romana. The Doctor as galactic buffoon is suppressed for a calmer, subdued persona. The aura is beige and the music is electronic.

I don't like any of these stories; the science of Full Circle is laughable, the giant vampire of State Of Decay is embarrassingly realised and Warrior's Gate barely understands itself.

BUT, there is a charm to the eighteenth season, the new look/sound/atmosphere is refreshing, the gradual changes before the introduction of Peter Davison are interesting to follow, and the pay-off is the largely successful sequence of stories; Keeper Of Traken, Logopolis and Castrovalva.

And there are always positives; in particular Warrior's Gate is a most intriguing story which constantly throws up interesting imagery, it's such a disappointment that the tone is confused, there's no lack of ambition in terms of direction.

Buy this and watch it within the context of the other season 18 stories. Watch it because, even though Baker is lessened, he's still an amazing presence performing at time when the show was trying to leave him behind.

Interesting episodes if not good ones.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Adventures in E-Space with the Marshmen, Vampires and Tharils!, 15 May 2014
This review is from: Doctor Who: The E-Space Trilogy (Full Circle / State of Decay / Warriors' Gate) [DVD] (DVD)
Early January 2009 and the `Doctor Who' DVD range began with a brand new box-set release.

This is `The E-Space Trilogy', a series of adventures set in a pocket universe during the seventh and final season of Tom Baker's era in `Doctor Who'. It introduces us to new companion Adric (Matthew Waterhouse) and the last to feature Romana (Lalla Ward) and K-9 (John Leeson)

I enjoyed this trilogy very much as I was intrigued how things changed in 'Doctor Who's history.

`FULL CIRCLE'
The first story sets the trilogy very well.

The Doctor, Romana and K-9 are summoned back to Gallifrey. But on their way, the TARDIS slips through a gateway into E-Space. They arrive on the planet Alazarius and the Doctor and Romana have to find a way back to their own universe as Mistfall begins.

This story was by Andrew Smith (who I've had the pleasure of meeting). He submitted many story ideas before his story 'The Planet That Slept' got accepted and became `Full Circle'.

Matthew Waterhouse makes his first appearance as Adric, another young 'Who' fan who wanted to be in the show. This is a great introduction for Adric, a boy genius with a badge for Mathematical Excellence. He seizes his chance to stow aboard the TARDIS with the Doctor and Romana.

Tom Baker gives a terrific performance as the Doctor, despite being on his way out of the series. Tom's Doctor helps the people of Alazarius and works out the mystery of the Marshmen. He strikes up a good friendship with Decider Login and relies on Adric when Romana gets taken over.

Lalla Ward is pretty good as Romana. There was friction between Lalla and Tom during making this story, but their performances are standout. I liked the opening scene when the Doctor checks on her and she doesn't want to go back to Gallifrey since 'The Key to Time'.

I enjoyed K-9, voiced by John Leeson. K-9 does get abused pretty badly on-screen and off. K-9 has trouble controlling the TARDIS slipping into E-Space and chases the Marshmen through the boggy ground. The Marshmen behead K-9, which shocked and upset me when I saw it.

The supporting cast include the tennage Outlers (Richard Willis as Varsh, Adric's brother; Bernard Padden as Tylos and lovely June Page as Keara) and the three Deciders (James Bree as Nefred; Alan Rowe as Garif and George Baker as Login).

I was absolutely delighted George Baker was in this, since I'd seen him in an episode of `Some Mothers Do `Ave Them'. Login is a likeable character who becomes a Decider on Alazarius.

I found the Marshmen pretty daft. I did like that shot of them coming out of the water at the end of `Part One'. But when you look at them, they're guys in costumes and masks and didn't convince me.

This was director Peter Grimwade's first `Doctor Who' story, and he does a pretty good job making the action sequences exciting. I like the location scenes of Alazarius and the interior of the Starliner.

The special features include a commentary with Matthew Waterhouse, Andrew Smith and Christopher H. Bidmead; an isolated music option by Paddy Kingsland and an info-text commentary option. There's a making-of documentary called `All Aboard The Starliner'; a featurette called 'K-9 in E-Space' and a `Swap Shop' interview with Matthew Waterhouse.

There's also a documentary called `E-Space - Fact or Fiction?'; 'continuity' announcements; a photo gallery and a Radio Times listings for the story.

This story is a great start to the E-Space trilogy and is well-written by Andrew Smith. It's a great introduction for Adric, and is an exciting start of a journey for the Fourth Doctor and Romana to get back home and escape this strange universe they're in. Will they survive?

`STATE OF DECAY'
This is the second story of trilogy and it's a gothic tale full of blood-curdling proportions.

The Doctor and Romana arrive on an alien planet whilst journeying through E-Space. They discover the planet under the rule of vampires who want blood and rise up into the sky.

I don't like vampires, but I enjoyed watching this story and the world Terrance Dicks created with the vampires. It's wonderfully directed by Peter Moffatt and suits the Tom Baker era beautifully.

This story was by Terrance Dicks, and was originally called `The Vampire Mutation'. In 1980, producer John Nathan-Turner asked Terrance Dicks to write this story for Tom's last season.

Peter Moffatt was chosen to direct this story on the basis it was to be a gothic tale. Peter managed to get JNT to revert the script back to its gothic form after it became too futuristic.

In the story, Adric returns who's stowed away aboard the TARDIS. Adric soon gets lured by the vampire lords who offer him immortality. Will he be a servant of the vampires forever?

I like Tom Baker's Doctor as he's pretty aloof and given some funny lines. I like it when the Doctor says hello to one of the villagers and he runs away. I also like it when he and Romana climb down the bowels of the Hydrax ship and cries in pain saying, `You jumped on my toe!' which made me laugh.

Lalla Ward as Romana is pretty good too. Tensions between Lalla and Tom are on and off by this point. I love it when the Doctor and Romana climb in the inspection hatch. Both are horrified when they witness the chamber of dead bodies and fuel tanks dripping with blood.

K-9 (voiced by John Leeson) spends most of his time in the TARDIS. But he becomes useful helping the Doctor to find out more about the vampires and gets into overthrow the vampires' castle.

The Three Who Rule vampires are pretty terrifying including Zargo the King (William Lindsay); Camilla the Queen (Rachel Davies) and Aukon the Councillor (Emrys James).

The frightened village is led by Ivo (Clinton Greyn), who is a weary-beaten man looking after his people; keeping the village together and selects those who are to be taken for feasting.

I like the design work on this story as it feels pretty gothic in the village and the castle. I love the idea of the castle turning out to be a spaceship.

The special features include a commentary with Peter Moffatt, Terrance Dicks and Matthew Waterhouse; an isolated music option by Paddy Kingsland and an info-text commentary option. There's a making-of documentary called `The Vampire Lovers'; `film trims' and two vampire documentaries called 'Leaves of Blood' and 'The Blood Show'.

There's `The Frayling Reading', an analysis on 'State of Decay' by historian Sir Christopher Frayling; continuity announcements; a photo gallery and a PDF Radio Times listing for the story.

`State of Decay' is a chilling; disturbing gothic tale that started a trend of vampire stories in 'Doctor Who'. You'll need a strong stomach and a bolt of steel to brave your fears against vampires!

Take a side-step adventure with the Doctor, Romana and Adric in 'The Invasion of E-Space'.

`WARRIORS' GATE'
The third and final story of The E-Space Trilogy and it's one of the complex stories ever to be made.

If you find this story puzzling, don't worry! You're not alone. This story was by Steve Gallagher, whose script got turned inside and out by Christopher H. Bidmead and director Paul Joyce.

The story has the Doctor, Romana, Adric and K-9 arriving at the gateway between two universes to try and get back home. But the price of returning home will mean the loss of friends.

The story was fraught with problems. Although enthusiastic, director Paul Joyce was pretty slow on getting the shots. As a result, Joyce was sacked by producer JNT before he was reinstated.

This story feels pretty dreamlike, especially when passing strange environments in a white void and some of the dialogue doesn't make sense. The conflict is between humans and the lion-like Tharils.

The human slave traders are led by Rorvik (Clifford Rose) a bad version of `Dad's Army's Captain Mannering. There's also Packard (Kenneth Cope, from 60's `Randall and Hopkirk (Deceased)).

The main Tharil is Biroc (David Weston) who's a lion-like time sensitive being that breaks into the TARDIS. There's also Lazlo (Jeremy Gittins, who played the Vicar in `Keeping Up Appearances').

There are the Gundan robots that keep watch in the stone Gateway. I found that moment creepy and frightening, when one Gundan wakes and makes it way to kill the Doctor! It moves!

Adric (Matthew Waterhouse) is rather limited in terms of character. He joins K-9 in the white void and eventually meets up with Romana. I was shocked when Adric sat on K-9 at one point.

Tom Baker as the Doctor is grand as ever. He manages to have some defining moments as he gets caught in the crossfire between two Gundan robots and challenges Biroc and his kind over how they used to be rulers of slaves once, and knocks over a full couplet of wine to prove it.

This happens to be Lalla Ward's last story as Romana. I found it rather abrupt when Romana announced she's leaving the Doctor. It happened so fast and wasn't well-deserved for Romana's exit. But at least she does a noble thing staying behind in E-Space to free the Tharils from slavery.

This also is K-9's (voiced by John Leeson) last story in the series. K-9 becomes delirious when affected by the time winds. But at least the Doctor gives K-9 to Romana to keep when staying behind with the Tharils. K-9 helps Romana in her mission to free the Tharils from enslavement.

The special features include an audio commentary with Lalla Ward; John Leeson; Paul Joyce (director); Christopher H. Bidmead (script editor) and Mat Irvine (visual effects designer); an isolated music option by Peter Howell and an info-text commentary option. There's a making-of documentary called `The Dreaming'; an interview with Matthew Waterhouse called 'The Boy With The Golden Star' and a frockumentary called `Lalla's Wardrobe' looking into Romana's costumes.

There's some `extended and deleted scenes'; `continuity' announcements for Warriors'; a photo gallery and a PDF document of the Radio Times Listings for the story.

'Warriors' Gate' is a startling, eerie and bemusing tale to finish off The E-Space Trilogy. It's a story I still can't get my head around, but it's a decent swansong for Romana and K-9 who leave the series.

I've thoroughly enjoyed `The E-Space Trilogy'. It was fantastic watching these stories and the special features to go with them. I found it interesting exploring how `Doctor Who' was changing. Each story is different in the trilogy, but they are so worthy of the entertainment for a `Doctor Who' fan!

There's a 'coming soon' trailer on all three stories for the `The Rescue' and `The Romans'.

The next story for the Doctor and Adric is 'The Keeper of Traken'.
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3.0 out of 5 stars Bidmead Space, 13 Jun. 2013
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This review is from: Doctor Who: The E-Space Trilogy (Full Circle / State of Decay / Warriors' Gate) [DVD] (DVD)
OK, we're in a multi part thing again, so to deal with the thing in multiple parts...

Circle: Clever idea. Very clever idea. Well done, Smith; take a half-holiday and a gold star - just like Adric's.

I found Adric difficult to like, and even Matthew Waterhouse admits he doesn't come across like the Artful Dodger in this (or in much else to be honest); excellence in mathematics is a very good thing, but it doesn't endear you to many teenagers, or grown ups come to that. And I'd have thought that he'd have learned that - with big brother's older, cooler mates - keep quiet about the star.

That said I'm not sure about the Outlers either; Varsh is very good, but I can't believe Keara isn't his girlfriend, nor that Tylos isn't jealous. Apparently this was considered at one point, but why not adopted as obvious? Teenagers without sex? Don't be silly.

That's my problem with it; I'm inclined to believe Dexeter, I believe that the whole society is run by three really quite dull men, and I believe that they are all basically marsh creatures under varying amounts of evolution, and it niggles me because I'm being asked to believe all that, while I cannot believe that Varsh and Keara don't have something going.

So there we are, it looks great, it's got a great concept, and the shot of the Marshmen emerging from the swamp is brilliant, but the one thing I could engage with emotionally, I'm not allowed to. 3/5

What a State to get in: Vampires Dr? Are you sure?

You've got to feel for Terrence Dicks; he does the Frankenstein one and Robert Holmes re-writes it, then he does the Dracula one and CHB tells him to re-write it. As it is Peter Moffat refused to direct the CHB version, and we got this one. I'd like to see what CHB did with it, because this is dull!

The villagers are flat, the rebels are plodding, the vampires lack vamp, and even Emrys James is ponderous; someone in The Making Of talks him 'giving it a bit of hoyle as we say in Wales' - that'll mean 'acting in a not particularly interesting way', then?

The story is unremarkable; in the end it depends on finding out that the Time Lords had the whole vampire thing sewn up ages ago, and that all the tools for sorting it now are still lying around now. Not a lot about the Human Condition to learn from this one.

The key failure is that it's dull - in a story about a huge batty thing consuming humans, the humans are drawn so faintly as to be barely worth our care. This, of course, may be what's meant by 'The Wasting'. Waste of something, that's for sure. 2/5

That Gate - I don't fully understand Warrior's Gate, but I do like it. My befuddlement has a lot to do with the science that CHB seems to have been so keen on, but that's OK because Clifford Rose and Kenneth Cope are eminently watchable, and the two clowns are great fun, and I love the Gundan robots, especially the scene where they smash up the banquet, and it looks great - even the bits in the white void - especially the inside of the ship, even if part of it is the Vogon ship from HHGTTG. And even if I don't get the science, I do get the story - cruelty. oppression, slavery, greed and stupidity - good Dr Who story stuff.

The monochrome stills of Powys Castle as Romana's new home work really rather well too. My only puzzle with WG is 'If so much of it's shot on green screen, where did all the budget go?' 4/5

The Making Of stuff is interesting - if only to learn just how badly certain people were behaving while all this lot was being made. Certain people just didn't *deserve* to be making Dr Who.
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