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32 of 34 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Rule Britannia!
We yanks have been waiting three decades for a quality home video release of this lost film. On our side of the ocean, it was critically lambasted on the heels of MURDER ON THE ORIENT EXPRESS, which was, of course, perfection. TEN LITTLE INDIANS wasn't, but the old girl has been filmed roughly once per generation, and mine grew up with this version, despite its blemishes...
Published on 11 Feb 2010 by Alec Howe

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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A fun classic whose style may feel a little too 'stagey' for new viewers
I enjoyed re-watching this old classic, as it's one of the original 'murder by numbers' thrillers. Ten strangers accept an invitation to an expensive hotel in the desert, only to find their host missing and themselves accused of having escaped justice for major crimes by a taped message. And then one by one, they start to end up dead...
The cast are great fun, the...
Published 10 months ago by Benminx


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32 of 34 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Rule Britannia!, 11 Feb 2010
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This review is from: And Then There Were None [DVD] (DVD)
We yanks have been waiting three decades for a quality home video release of this lost film. On our side of the ocean, it was critically lambasted on the heels of MURDER ON THE ORIENT EXPRESS, which was, of course, perfection. TEN LITTLE INDIANS wasn't, but the old girl has been filmed roughly once per generation, and mine grew up with this version, despite its blemishes. The novel was even reissued in paperback with the film's brilliant cover art -- which, truth to tell, promises a sense of class and fidelity to the original that the finished product doesn't begin to deliver. But here it is, in a beautiful widescreen transfer (the aspect ratio is a full 1.85:1, rather than the 1.66:1 stated on the DVD cover or the 1.33:1 listed on Amazon). The Iranian locations finally glisten in daytime and nighttime splendor after so many years of shadowy, grainy darkness on VHS. And, if nothing else, some of Agatha Christie's characters are finally cast according to type -- Richard Attenborough, Herbert Lom, Gert Froebe and Oliver Reed are virtual embodiments of Wargrave, Armstrong, Blore and Lombard as Christie wrote them. The horrendous acting and sloppy overdubbing are exposed all the more by the high quality video and audio resolution, but we'll take it! Thanks Great Britain for releasing this one, and at such a bargain of a price.
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12 of 13 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A Great Adaptation Of The Agatha Christie Novel, 18 Jan 2004
Although there are not really that many adaptations of the Agatha Christie novel 'And Then There Were None', and although the Hollywood version in 1945 is concidered to be the best, my personal favourite is this one, and although it doesn't stick to the original story in quiet a few places, it does not make this film any less enjoyable.
It is basically about ten people who are invited to a big house out in the desert by 'UN Owen'. When they get there, they find that the real reason they have been brought there is to be murdered one by one.
Unlike the other adaptations, this 1975 version has an all-star cast including Sir Richard Attenbrough, Gert Fobe, Oliver Reed, Orson Welles and Herbert Lom, who are all on top form.
As i have already mentioned, this adaptation does not stick to the original story very well at all. Instead of the house that they are all invited to being on an island like it is in the book, it is in the middle of a desert. A lot of the characters have also been changed, not just in their names, but in the crimes that they were supposed to have committed. The ending to the film is different to the book as well, however this ending was written by Agatha Christie herself, because the original ending is just a series of letters from 'UN Owen' explaining how he did it, and this of course cannot be done for the film or on stage, hence why she wrote an alternative.
Agatha Christie saw the book as one of her greatest achievements and the critics and readers agreed. And now i'm sure that you will agree with me that this is a great adaptation and although generally not concidered to be the best, it's still a great adaptation and an even greater movie.
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19 of 21 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Ten Little Europeans, 4 Feb 2010
By 
Mr. Jonathon T. Beckett "vampire lover" (Dracula's Crypt) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: And Then There Were None [DVD] (DVD)
!!WARNING. MAY CONTAIN SPOILERS!!!

Ten people are sent invitations by a mysterious Mr Owen to attend a party. The party is at an Iranian hotel in the middle of the desert, so the guests are flown in by helicopter. The guests are all perplexed as to why they have been invited, as they do not know their host. The mystery deepens when Owen doesn't join the guests for dinner that evening. Then, as they all relax after dinner, a tape recording of Owen's voice booms through the speakers. In the recording, he accuses each of his guests of terrible crimes, and of evading justice. The disparite group first think it a sick joke, but when they start to die one by one, the smiles soon dissapear from their faces, especially when they start to realise that Mr Owen is indeed in the hotel, as he is one of the ten guests present. The nursery rhyme each guest has on their bedroom wall, soon becomes a chilling reality as the 'ten little indians' become nine, then eight, seven....
This film is the third adaptation of Agatha Christie's 'Ten Little Indians'. Both the 1945 and the 1965 versions contained more humour, but I think that this straight laced adaptation works best despite being far from perfect. The location of the story is changed from the island mansion in previous versions to the isolated hotel, but this proves to be an excellent move as the surrounding desert provides a very eerie atmosphere and the hotel itself is full of dark corners and long, twisting corridors. The guests are all given legitimate reasons for being there, some to work for Owen, others to assist him in some capacity and others as guests. There are a couple of great scenes, one being when the tape of Owen's voice accuses each in turn and the camera follows the guests around the room as they listen in stunned silence. The second is a marvellous scene with Dr Armstrong(Herbert Lom) and Judge Cannon(Richard Attenborough) facing each other on either side of the billiards table as the lights flicker dangerously. There's some terrific dialogue here as the two men play mental games with eachother.
On the minus side, the very wide range of accents on display here from the multi-national cast can be distracting at times, and some of the characters are a bit underdeveloped. A couple of the murders are a bit irrational as well seeming more like accidents than planned events.
The film has a distinguished cast led by Oliver Reed, the aforementioned Lom and Attenborough, and many others including Gert Frobe, Elke Sommer and Charles Azvanour. The whole affair reeks of the 1970's with it's all star cast and glamourous locations and style. That is however, a very good thing in my opinion, as is the lack of one of Christie's 'super' sleuths to conveniently work it all out at the end.
If you're looking for gritty realism or biting satire look elsewhere, but if you're in the mood for an old fashioned whodunnit to thoroughly entertain you then look no further, as this charming film fits the bill perfectly.
The Optimum release does the film justice, as it has a lovely picture quality, and decent sound quality too. 5 out of 5
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A fun classic whose style may feel a little too 'stagey' for new viewers, 12 Feb 2014
This review is from: And Then There Were None [DVD] (DVD)
I enjoyed re-watching this old classic, as it's one of the original 'murder by numbers' thrillers. Ten strangers accept an invitation to an expensive hotel in the desert, only to find their host missing and themselves accused of having escaped justice for major crimes by a taped message. And then one by one, they start to end up dead...
The cast are great fun, the famous names including Bond luminaries Gert Frobe and Adolfo Celi, and the mystery retains a degree of Agatha Christie charm and playfulness.
Some moments will seem silly - the melodrama is rather overbaked, and an attempt to flee in the desert is badly filmed and edited so that a character seems to expire within 5 minutes of leaving the hotel. Also, either someone forgot to change a script line, or forgot to shoot "day for night", as one character remarks in wonder: "the ruins are spooky at night" as they walk out of the hotel into bright daylight.
Oliver Reed seems to be having a lark and trots about playfully at unexpected moments (possibly drunk?), and the music score is occasionally inappropriate. However - all that said, it still remains good fun, and is well worth watching.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A good film., 3 Feb 2014
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This review is from: And Then There Were None [DVD] (DVD)
A lot of people have slated this film and while it is not as good as the two earlier versions it is still an excellent film with a good cast. If you do not know the twist in the tale at the end then perhaps the earlier black and white versions might be a better buy, as they are truly superb. However, if you are a fan of Agatha Christie, and this is her masterpiece, you will enjoy this film, if just to compare against previous versions and the book. Still the best whodunnit ever written.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Guest House Homicido, 1 Nov 2010
This review is from: And Then There Were None [DVD] (DVD)
There's something intrinsically Nineteen-seventies about this adaptation of Agatha Christie's classic novel Ten Little Indians; perhaps it's the European cast, perhaps it's the fashions, or maybe the opulent hotel setting; whatever it is it makes for a supremely silly but hugely entertaining 90 minutes or so. 'Dickie' Attenborough is creepily effective as the hanging judge, whilst the film boasts not one but two ex-James Bond villains in Gert Frobe and Adolfo Celi; Oliver Reed and Elke Sommer are the unscrupulous lovers whilst Gallic pop veteran Charles Aznavour gets to display his smooth tones - albeit in a dodgily dubbed style.
Things kick-off pretty swiftly and we are soon treated to the sight of the ten ill-fated guests being unceremoniously offed - the paranoia and sense of foreboding increasing with each grisly slaying.
Overall this is a decent if straightforward telling of the Christie favourite, and is well worth a look.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars And finally it was released!, 17 Feb 2010
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This review is from: And Then There Were None [DVD] (DVD)
I placed an order for this through Amazon when it briefly appeared in the forthcoming releases section as I recall this atmospheric movie from my younger days. As mentioned in another review the idea of the Christie mysteries without the "super sleuth" are quite refreshing and this gem of a movie is wonderfully paced (even if it is a little slow by modern standards). Perhaps, this is a bit of a wild idea but, this was the original "slasher" movie from which the later films such as I Know What You Did Last Summer and so forth took their cues, only they portrayed the deaths more graphically compared to the fact that only two of the actual deaths are even remotely visible on screen in this film. Christie used this plot line frequently but incorporated Poirot and Marple and other sleuths and each time it was ingenious and neatly executed and I think that even with such a star cast this version of And Then There Were None (yes I know it's not the original title -even on the film itself) really worked so well and the menace of the location added to the whole.

As I mentioned this film impressed me when I was much younger and Oliver Reed certainly was exactly as I recall. Great performances, too, from Herbert Lom and (Sir) Richard Attenborough. Even Elke Sommer stood out well as she had one of the more long lived parts and I was surprised by her (albeit) brief nudity which I hadn't remembered but she did play the serious character very well considering my other film featuring her is a Carry On!

The slow termination of a group one by one is a great idea for a mystery and this is one of the best portrayals on film that I have ever seen. The transition to DVD has really given the picture quality a boost too as I recall the film being quite grainy when I last saw it on TV back in the 80's. All in all a must have addition to any collection of Christie.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Agatha Christie story reset in Iran, 9 Jan 2014
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Andrew Banks - See all my reviews
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This review is from: And Then There Were None [DVD] (DVD)
This 1974 film version of the famous Agatha Christie novel takes place in a hotel in the Iranian desert, as opposed to an island off the Devon coast in the original novel. The main location, the Abbasi Hotel, is a good choice and provides an atmospheric back drop for the action. The cast is generally good, too, especially Oliver Reed as Hugh Lombard, and Herbert Lom as Dr Anderson. There are changes to the backstories of some of the characters, in part because of the international nature of the cast, and some of the methods used by the killer to dispatch his victims are changed from the novel, which in my opinion is a pity because the novel's internal logic is a lot more effective than that of this screenplay. However, on the whole, this is a fairly entertaining movie.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Agatha Christy in the movies, 21 Dec 2013
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Good classic British drama by director Peter Collinson (of The Italian Job fame). Never mind the quality - feel the width!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Another neat English mystery, 8 Sep 2013
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Another version of the Ten Little Indians by Agatha Christie...this time in the desert. Always enjoy this story...probably my favorite no matter how it is done
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And Then There Were None [DVD]
And Then There Were None [DVD] by Peter Collinson (DVD - 2010)
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