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6
3.5 out of 5 stars
Last Exit
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14 of 16 people found the following review helpful
As it turned out, this was only Traffic's first exit. Rather like Cream's "Goodbye", it is a cobbled mixture of studio and live tracks, and it is not up to the standard of their first two outings. For me, the main attraction is the live version of "Feeling good" - not quite as good as the classic Nina Simone version, but still inspiring and very adventurous. The three best of the studio tracks are available elsewhere, e.g. on the excellent "Smiling Phases" compilation or the 2000 CD re-issue of the second album "Traffic", so unless you want "Feeling good" (which as far as I know is not on any other release) "Last Exit" cannot be regarded as essential. It is off catalogue at the time of writing, and I can't imagine there is huge demand for its re-release.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
on 8 August 2009
"Last Exit" was originally thought as a farewell album from Traffic, as the band had split just prior to its release. Later when Steve Winwood was working on his first album, both Chris Wood and Jim Capaldi helped backing him, so eventually it turned out to be a new Traffic album; and Traffic was reborn. This time without Dave Mason, who had already been walking in and out of the band several times.
Dave is only partly present on this album. "Medicated Goo" and "Shanghai Noodle Factory" was recorded late 1968 without Mason. The 2 live tracks "Feeling Good" and "Blind Man" are also Winwood, Capaldi and Wood alone.

"Just For You" is more or less Mason solo. "Withering Tree" had already been released a B-side. The instrumental "Something`s Got a Hold on My Toe" is probably a studio outtake from the sessions for their second album.

As for the music; The new songs "Medicated Goo" and "Shanghai Noodle Factory" are great . "Withering Tree" and "Just For You" are classic Traffic. The live-tracks are interesting, but the sound is not so good as could be wished for. The instrumental "Something`s Got a Hold on My Toe" has probably just been included to add to the playing time.

I would have preferred some more singles-tracks like "Paper Sun", "Hole in My Shoe", "Coloured Rain", "Here We Go Round The Mulberry Bush" and "Am I What I was, or Am I What I Am". This would have made the album much better, and the album could have completed the first era of a great band.
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on 10 February 2014
I love Traffic. This is not one of their finest albums. Welcome to the Canteen, Low Spark of High heeled Boys, Shoot Out at the Fantasy Factory and On the Road, are, in my opinion, all five star albums. Enjoy them.
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3 of 5 people found the following review helpful
on 2 September 2003
Originally released as a posthumous album during the band's first break-up, 'Last Exit' is a collection of live tracks and studio outtakes much in the format of the Who's 'Odds and Sodds'. That isn't to say that the listener is forced to feed on scraps--far from it in fact. 'Last Exit' is (in places) Traffic at their surreal, psychedelic best--particularly on Medicated Goo and Shanghai Noodle Factory where Stevie Winwood's laid-back, joyous vocals almost radiate sunshine. The addition of two live tracks (the standout being their cover of Nina Simone's Feelin' Good) gives the listener a taste of what concerts used to be like in the days when experimentation (on stage and off!) was heartily encouraged. Perhaps not the best album to buy if you're just getting into Traffic, but a worthwhile addition to any comprehensive collection.
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on 24 December 2014
Again no tack info, whats the point?
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0 of 3 people found the following review helpful
on 14 February 2013
I heard Alan Freeman play one track off this album in the 60s and it has taken me this long to get a copy
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