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4.3 out of 5 stars
No Reason To Cry
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
This, for me, is one of Clapton's best solo albums. In his earlier solo career he seemed to be looking for a musical identity, while trying to leave the guitar god image behind. His first few albums saw him trying out a wide range of musical styles, and bringing his singing to the fore. Some great stuff resulted, but here it just seemed to click and a really great album resulted.

Clapton has always been at his best when working with other artists of the same stature, his work with Cream or Derek and the Dominos for example. And I think it is the impressive roster of guest artists on this album that pushes Clapton to do something special. With guest appearances from Bob Dylan, most of the Band, Ronnie Wood and Georgie Fame, there was a lot of talent floating around the recording studio.

The tone of the album is largely laid back and reflective, bluesy but with a pop element. The presence of Danko, Manuel and Dylan ensure that there is a strong feel of country blues to proceedings, especially on the songs they wrote.

Clapton finds the right blend of guitar and vocals, and both are pretty good on this album. Leaving the guitar pyrotechnics behind he still manages to weave rich musical tapestries with his more understated style, all the more impressive as it is so understated. The guests add to the album, but never take over. And, unusually for an album with so many big names contributing, it feels like a very unified album. It's an old friend, and one that goes on the record player quite regularly.
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15 of 16 people found the following review helpful
on 25 September 2003
On listening to this album, what's clear is that the quality of the song takes precedent over guitar solos. This makes a refreshing change from many of EC's other albums. Highlights include "Innocent Times", "Hello Old Friend", "Black Summer Rain", "Sign Language", and "Carnival". This album has become one of my favorites over the last 12 months and i thoroughly recommend it.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
on 19 January 2007
The other reviewers have hit the nail on the heads really. It sounds like Clapton fronting a jam. If you've come to this album because of the collaborative nature, and an interest in particular in hearing Bob & God in the same tune and maybe liked the Bob & George bootlegs or the unreleased Derek album this is for you. If you want another "Blues" or "461", look elsewhere. If this is your first Clapton purchase, listen to a clip or two on itunes if poss.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on 4 August 2011
I first bought this album when it came out in 1976, but has remained unplayed for the past 25 years or so due to lack of a turntable. Recent interest in the Shangri La studios, where it was recorded, led me to re purchase on CD format. This is a must for any fan of The Band as well as Clapton fans. Recorded roughly the same time as the Last Waltz concert when the Band were about to disband, and bearing mind Clapton's longstanding appreciation of The Band, there was plenty of opportunity to produce some great songs. Watching Clapton's Further On Up The Road in the Last Waltz concert film demonstrates how together they all were as musicians. Stand out tracks are Sign Language, All Our Past Times and Black Summer Rain. The rest are all very good but the slightly lame Last Night (an CD extra) is wasted opportunity to expand the CD version, there must be other tapes from the sessions around....
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TOP 500 REVIEWERon 11 April 2015
Dating from 1976 this is album is very much in the country rock/pop/blues mould of releases like 'Slow hand' and '461 Ocean Boulevard' that typified much of Clapton’s work since leaving Cream. Even Eric’s most devoted fan (I count myself as one of his more reserved admirers) would have to say that ‘No Reason to Cry’ that while it could be considered a ‘very good ‘ effort does not quite reach ‘classic’ status. The blues tunes ‘Country Jail Blues’ and ‘Double Trouble’ are nicely done. Tracks like ‘Beautiful Thing’ and ‘Hello Old Friend’ are catchy and have a certain vim about them. However it is the wonderful ‘Black Summer Rain’, the Gospelly ‘Innocent Times’ and the emotionally resonant ‘All Our Past Times’ that show that this album does have a beating heart beneath the production sheen and skilled playing.

‘No Reason To Cry’ is one of those ear friendly albums that you turn to from time to time when a fillip is required. I have always enjoyed this album and every time I put the disc in my player some little musical detail always seems to pop up and delight. Ps: listen out to Robbie Robertson on ‘Black Summer Rain’, he really lifts things. The remastering adds clarity and depth. Shame this CD edition could not have included an essay offering insight into the album itself, or even a few photo’s!!!
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8 of 10 people found the following review helpful
I consider this album very under-rated. If it is atypical of Clapton, then all the better for it. The highlight of the album for me is "sign language", the Dylan collaboration but the laid back "black summer rain" is a superb track, laid back Clapton at his best. "Hello old friend" was a successful single and again, it's a fine track.

Double trouble doesn't really pull it off for me. Some may like it and it's not a bad track, just done better by others.

Carnival is a bit of fun but not a bad track nonetheless. The other tracks are ok and generally the whole album is worth a listen.

It seems that the best tracks on this are the Clapton originals and the Clapton / Dylan collaboration. It's a shame that EC couldn't write some more original material like this.

Note that by modern CD standards this album is also fairly short.
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5 of 7 people found the following review helpful
Slotted as it is between the magnificent 461 and Slowhand,albeit with another fine album....there's one in every etc, this is not clapton's best but it sure has it's moments.All in all a laid back and bluesy album during EC's drunk period......I think Yvonne conceived round about this time....Eric's mind was elsewhere.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on 1 June 2013
No Reason To Cry is not so much an album by Eric Clapton And His Band as Eric Clapton And His Band And A Whole Bunch Of Musician Mates - including Bob Dylan and nearly all of The (actual) Band. It's arguably E.C.'s most 'musicianly' solo album and has a relaxed feel which reflected the concept of The Band's Shangri-la studios, where it was recorded. Eric had long admired that group, which had been an important influence on him since the end of Cream (when he and George Harrison wrote "Badge") and he had played alongside The Band at The Last Waltz. If you play something yourself, I think this album will definitely appeal but it's also accessible on a more casual level, with a couple of great blues covers - "County Jail Blues" and "Double Trouble" and fairly familiar numbers in "All Our Past Times" and "Hello Old Friend".

Eric wrote, or co-wrote, half of the original 10 tracks and the album was superbly produced by Rob Fabroni. For me, every song has something going for it and particular highlights are "Sign Language" which features Bob Dylan and E.C. on vocals (although I think the spectacular lead guitar is by Robbie Robertson), "Black Summer Rain" and the aforementioned "Double Trouble". Marcy Levy's "Innocent Times" is perhaps best listened to with the volume turned down low if you're prone to migraines.

The CD has an extra track, "Last Night", a fact cunningly disguised on this release to the extent of even being included on the reproduced inner sleeve (!) - not quite 'original artwork' then and cleverly done. The song itself is a typical out-take - interesting to hear but you can see why it didn't make it onto the original album.
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on 14 August 2013
Was Eric down when they played this songs, yes he was, he was down but genius , brilliant feel , so involvement
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on 5 June 2015
Good stuff they were having a party here georgie fame the band and mr dylan all on hand great stuff
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