Customer Reviews


18 Reviews
5 star:
 (16)
4 star:
 (1)
3 star:
 (1)
2 star:    (0)
1 star:    (0)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


19 of 20 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great music, deep thoughts, amazing result.
I think that this is one of the Who's finest moments.
After Who's Next and Quadrophenia, Pete Townshend proves once more that he is a great composer and lyricist, or if I dare say, poet.
His inner pain comes in harmony in the songs 'However Much I Booze', 'Dreaming From The Waist','How Many Friends' and 'They're All In Love'. The more light-hearted 'Squeeze Box'...
Published on 27 April 2003 by Maria Zervou

versus
5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Portrait of a troubled band
This is by far not the Who's best album - apart from the rather twee "Squeeze Box," The Who By Numbers produced no hit singles at the time (I would personally have chosen "Slip Kid," as it's a much stronger and better track, and still gets plenty of air play on US classic rock radio). They had peaked commercially with the previous 3 studio efforts - Tommy...
Published 20 months ago by William M. Feagin


‹ Previous | 1 2 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

19 of 20 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great music, deep thoughts, amazing result., 27 April 2003
By 
Maria Zervou "i live music" (London, UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Who By Numbers (Audio CD)
I think that this is one of the Who's finest moments.
After Who's Next and Quadrophenia, Pete Townshend proves once more that he is a great composer and lyricist, or if I dare say, poet.
His inner pain comes in harmony in the songs 'However Much I Booze', 'Dreaming From The Waist','How Many Friends' and 'They're All In Love'. The more light-hearted 'Squeeze Box' and 'Blue, Red and Grey' lift spirits up, until you listen to the bonus live performances at the end (from the legendary concert in Swansea in 1976) and you are blown away!
Everyone should listen 'Dreaming From The Waist'. It's an amazing combination of music, lyrics, production and a great example of the chemistry of the four members of the group: Roger's dynamic vocals, John's amazing bass lines, Pete's unbelievable guitar riffs and Keith's incredible drumming.
A chemistry that verifies The Who as the Rock Giants that they are!
A perfect album for every Who and Rock fan!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


31 of 37 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Who's Most Personal Album, 21 July 2004
By 
Will Culp (Greenville, South Carolina) - See all my reviews
This review is from: The Who By Numbers (Audio CD)
(Actual Rating- 4.5 Stars)
The Who By Numbers(1975). The Who's Eighth Album.
After the Massive Success of 'Who's Next' and 'Quadrophenia', The Who, instead of composing a Rock Opera or a Concept Album, decided to just Rock it out, and for that reason, some of
Townshend's most personal songwriting comes out to play. Pete Townshend chronicles his problems with alcohol ("However Much I Booze"), women ("Dreaming from the Waist" and "They Are All in Love"), and life in general. 'The Who By Numbers' was obviously a team effort, with Townshend's personal songwriting and guitar flair, Keith Moon's magnificent drumming, Roger Daltrey's sneering vocals, and John Enthwhistle's smooth basslines(The song "Success Story" is his shining moment here), The Who was ready to rock, and they succeeded well with 'The Who By Numbers'. Over time 'The Who By Numbers' has become a huge hit, going Platinum and spawning the major hit "Squeeze Box" and the minor hit "Slip Kid", showing it's legacy is still intact. So how does 'The Who By Numbers' measure up? Is it a dark moment in the Who's career, or a good one? Read on to find out!
Track Ratings-
Slip Kid- "Slip Kid" starts off 'The Who By Numbers' perfectly, as immediately Townshend's innocent keyboarding and Moon's drumming come on, and Daltrey's sarcastic vocals poke and
prod throughout behind Townshend's piercing guitar. "Slip Kid" is Classic Rock at its best.
However Much I Booze- "However Much I Booze" is Townshend's song, as his cheery vocals and acoustic guitar playing take center-stage. It's odd "However Much I Booze" is played so
happily, as the subject matter is so dark. Nevertheless "However Much I Booze" is an energetic acoustic rocker that won't fail to please.
Squeeze Box- "Squeeze Box" displays Townshend's sultry acoustic riff behind Daltrey's vocals that sound as if they are joking. "Squeeze Box" despite its short lenghth, is one of the Who's most classic songs, with a chorus and vocals to die for.
Dreaming From The Waist- "Dreaming From The Waist" mixes Enthwhistle and Townshend's bluesy beat, Keith Moon's perfectly on-the-mark drumming, and Daltrey's oddly angry vocals to
create an excellent bluesy rocker. Good guitarmanship and chorus!
Imagine A Man- "Imagine A Man" finds the Who doing a ballad, putting the main focus on Daltrey's oddly symphonic and soothing vocals behind a placid acoustic guitar beat, picking up
slightly for the chorus. A tad too slow, but not a terrible track. A pretty good track.
Success Story- "Success Story" finds Enthwhistle's oddly "Country Western" bassline complementing Daltrey's snivelling vocals, making "Success Story" a short but sweet gem.
They Are All In Love- "They Are All In Love" is a keyboard driven ballad, mixing heartbroken vocals courtesy Daltrey and soulful keyboarding. Great musicianship here makes "They Are All In Love" a great ballad. Contains Daltrey's famous "farting" noise!
Blue, Red, and Grey- "Blue, Red, and Grey" is a folk-inspired ballad, mixing Townshend's folk guitar with Daltrey's soulful vocals. "Blue, Red and Grey" is a folk ballad, and it comes out a little slow for me. Nonetheless excellent vocals from Daltrey.
How Many Friends- "How Many Friends" is a keyboard driven rocker, using Daltrey's betrayed vocals(Quite literally, this song's about being betrayed) to make "How Many Friends" a
memorable hard rocker that contains a great chorus!
In A Hand Or A Face- "In A Hand Or A Face" screams out the speaker with Townshend's piercing electric riff, but soon Daltrey's sneering vocals take center-stage behind the delicate
keyboarding. A great end to the album, "In A Face Or A Hand" is Classic Hard Rock at its best, using all of The Who to create an excellent song. Addictive chorus and guitar work!
The 1996 Remaster of 'The Who By Numbers' contains three Extra Tracks, which are Live versions of "Squeeze Box", "Behind Blue Eyes", and "Dreaming From The Waist". The Who have always been revered as a magnificent Live act, as 'Live At Leeds' will show, and these tracks are just icing on the cake, as they are magnificent versions that rival the studio cuts.
Overall, 'The Who By Numbers', while not being The Who's best, is nothing short of great, being only slightly blemished by "Imagine A Man" and "Blue, Red, And Grey", two ballads that drag on forever without much substance. After 'The Who By Numbers', The Who would record "Who Are You", before drummer Keith Moon tragically died, making 'The Who By Numbers' one of The Who's last and most professional albums.
HIGHLY RECOMMENDED FOR FANS OF CLASSIC ROCK AND THE WHO! OFTEN
OVERLOOKED IN THE WHO'S CATALOGUE, 'THE WHO BY NUMBERS' RIGHTFULLY BELONGS IN ANY CLASSIC ROCK OR WHO FAN'S COLLECTION!
Also Recommended-
Who's Next- The Who
Tommy- The Who
Who Are You?- The Who
Thanks For Reading!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Who's Better Than The Who? Who exactly!, 21 Nov 2005
By 
Mr. B. T. Carter "B Carter" (Ely, Cambs) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Who By Numbers (Audio CD)
I can't complement this LP highly enough. Its one of The Who's hidden gems. Many of the songs here have an autobiographical feeling to them. Townshends' lyrics are very sensitive and sung with such strength and character by both Daltrey and Townshend himself. Highlights? Slip Kid, However Much I Booze, the timeless Squeeze Box but the very best track for me personally is Blue Red & Grey. Its a beautiful track sung by Townshend accompanied only by the ukulele.
This is probably the last great Who LP. I pondered over buying it for a long time and I don't know why I waited so long to purchase it.
Well worth purchasing, you won't regret adding this to your collection!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Raging Against The Dying Of The Light, 4 Aug 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: The Who By Numbers (Audio CD)
This album is the closest The Who ever got to producing a sort of personal sensitive record of a singer songwriter, of course any album that has Keith Moon and John Entwhistle involved was never going to be that sensitive however there are moments on this album which are self examining songs such as 'However Much I Booze', 'Dreaming From The Waist' and 'Blue Red and Grey'. The album is not blighted by any Townshend concept. This is The Who raging against its own demise Moon was really in no fit state he had actually collapsed during a concert after taking an elephant tranquiliser!! but the album is great despite these handicaps 'Slip Kid' is excellent, there is a piece of Entwhistle cynicism with 'Success Story', the hit single 'Squeeze Box' and the glorious clatter of 'However Much I Booze'. This is a great band defying/raging against its problems and that is what makes this the last great Who album.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


8 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Powerful, cerebral rock!, 19 Jun 2003
By A Customer
This review is from: The Who By Numbers (Audio CD)
This album holds a very special place in my heart: its the first Who album I bought. Since then I have bought nearly every other, but I always drift back to this one. Many would recommend Who's Next as the best album to start with, but I'd opt for this one. It's without the Lifehouse/concept baggage of the earlier work, and is just an album of collected songs, albeit on a similar theme.
This theme is coming-of-age (not a new theme for the band) but the later coming-of-age that's not late teens but late twenties. It's also the coming-of-age of a rock band that realises they can't go on with the juvenile theatricals much longer. Consequently, song-writer Pete Townshend puts the focus back into well-crafted songs and self-criticism. A tad heavy perhaps for a casual rock fan, but if you know the genre well, this album can be a refreshing eye-opener.
Tracks that rock include "Slip Kid" and Entwistle's "Success Story," but there are other highlights like the guitar textures on "However Much I Booze," a killer chord sequence in "Dreaming From The Waist" and a lush melody in "They're All In Love." Musicians and songs are outstanding on this, and I really recommend you purchase it.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


9 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Classic Album, 2 April 2000
By A Customer
This review is from: The Who By Numbers (Audio CD)
This is a very special CD. Pete Townshend really puts heart and soul into it. It is not like many of the other albims by The Who, it is SO personal. Listen to tracks like "However Much I Booze" and "How Many Friends" they are really excellent. This CD often finds its way onto my player and I am sure it will for many more years... buy it and listen carefully.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Portrait of a troubled band, 26 Dec 2012
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: The Who By Numbers (Audio CD)
This is by far not the Who's best album - apart from the rather twee "Squeeze Box," The Who By Numbers produced no hit singles at the time (I would personally have chosen "Slip Kid," as it's a much stronger and better track, and still gets plenty of air play on US classic rock radio). They had peaked commercially with the previous 3 studio efforts - Tommy (1969), Who's Next (1971) and Quadrophenia (1973) - and with a hat trick like that, how do you follow it up?

Sadly, it would seem, the Who were never quite able to manage that. The songs here are good, not great, to middling - Townshend's demons were getting harder to hold back, all four members were putting more effort into their solo albums (although Pete was much less prolific than Daltrey or Entwistle, and even Keith Moon had made an album) and other projects - and it really seemed as if the band idea was taking a back seat to everything else. It might honestly be said that the best Who album of the mid '70s was Odds & Sods, which collected non-LP singles and outtakes in a manner rarely seen up to that point and which were, on the whole, better-quality tracks. Still, however, By Numbers should not be completely discounted - if you're a Who completist, you'll want this album, as it is a part of their canon. Just be advised that you may be underwhelmed. But even the most dedicated Who fan can find something of value in this long-player; don't pass it up.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Different, but still brilliant, 13 Jan 2009
By 
S. Taylor "Sam@ipodclassic" (Derbyshire) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Who By Numbers (Audio CD)
held back over buying this who album, even though im a really big fan, because it was not as recognised as the others.
However, far from dissappointed. Exceptionally good. A refreshing new slant by Pete Townshend and The Who, even though the stuff before was amazing.

Very impressed and i would reccomend to anyone who likes The Who, a definite 5 stars.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Doubt, denial, punch-ups and peace of sorts, 30 Jan 2009
This review is from: The Who By Numbers (Audio CD)
In August 1975 it had been two years since Quadrophenia, which itself had been two years after "Who's Next", so these were lean times for Who fans. It would be three years the next one. "The Who By Numbers" is a remarkable album, recorded in discord, punch-ups and hospitalisation for Townshend after a Daltrey special to the jaw. May and then August had seen two very honest and confrontational interviews in NME first from Townshend being highly critical of himself and especially Daltrey, (leading to the Big Fight)and then Roger Daltrey laying it on the line about Pete's problems, all caused by Pete himself. Here was the atmosphere for the recording!

Sessions had to be suspended as Townshend, Moon and Entwistle took time out to get their feel again as a working unit. On return the band knuckled (literally) down to produce a work of an extremely rare type for the times, the confessional, almost self-deprecating honesty of a band and specifically a song-writer who had to question whether their time had come and gone, were they still relevant to their ideals, and more importantly in their opinions, were their audience still receptive to The Who?

The answer is a resounding yes, still relevant, still receptive. On release there was much criticism in the letters pages of NME and Melody Maker over the lyrics of "They're All In Love" (Goodbye all you Punks...)while the confessional and self-analytical nature of other songs escaped many minds. Townshend didn't want to go down the same road as the majority of the Rock audience, the It's only Rock 'n Roll, it's entertainment with a few gestures (The Stones,Led Zep, Glam etc), so produced with Glyn Johns a re-statement for grown-ups, we're older but still here, here's my soul so take it or leave it. Funnily enough, it was "Squeezebox" which gave them a return to the Top ten singles charts, a laugh on record and off. The 1975 tours on the back of this showed, as NME journalist Charles Shaar-Murray said at the time "who the real Guv'nors were. Who's the Greatest Rock 'n roll band in the world? The Who, that's who". The audiences at the UK shows were mainly under 20's, so relevancy, not nostalgia, were assured. It's much the same today.

The re-issue/remaster comes with three live tracks from Swansea in June 1976, all excellent, especially Entwistle's bass fingering during "Dreamin' From The Waist". Sure, most Who fans would have preferred the live versions of rarieties performed on the '75 UK tour, but you can't have everything. 'Tho you can ask.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Who slip gracefully into middle age, 17 Feb 2001
By A Customer
This review is from: The Who By Numbers (Audio CD)
I bought this album with some sceptacism, but was pleasantly suprised. It is much mellower and less in your face than other albums and has some imaginative arrangements. "Squeeze Box," and "Slip Kid," are two of the best songs along with the reflective "How many friends," the live tracks round off a superb album.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 2 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

Only search this product's reviews