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4.6 out of 5 stars
All Things Must Pass
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
on 19 October 2011
When this album was reissued ten or eleven years ago, part of me was hoping that George had taken the trouble to strip away some of Phil Spector's heavy production which for me hasn't aged at all well. The Wall of Sound is somehow unsuited to George's introspection and his lovely slide guitar work is often buried under the brass and other forceful clutter that Spector was so famed for. When the production is relatively spare, such as in Behind That Locked Door, I'd Have You Anytime and Let It Roll the melody has a chance to breathe. The extra track I Live For You is a sweet and puzzling omission from the original album and a nice surprise here. George had stored up quite a few strong songs in the late sixties and this album is a clear high point for him, which he never reached again despite some other great songs later in his career. It is an album well worth returning to despite Spector's blitzkreigs, though the jam session at the end is best skipped.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
on 16 May 2012
For some reason I have not reviewed this album 'til now. First thing to be said, it is NOT a triple album. The third disc of jams is pretty forgettable and so I see this as a double album. And on that basis, it is a classic. Whilst not quite approaching The Beatles' White Album in sheer diversity, it nevertheless stands as one of the Top 5 Beatles solo albums.
I'd Have You Anytime: co-written with Dylan this is a subdued classic. 9/10
My Sweet Lord: forget the He's So Fine lawsuit, this song works because of its mighty production and mighty message. A song for all seasons. 10/10
Wah Wah: again, mighty production, the lyrics somewhat bitter (against Paul..and perhaps John?) but what a great guitar solo! 8/10
Isn't It A Pity - for the first four minutes it is sublime, I can't understand why The Beatles didn't recognise it's potential in 1969...but there you go. Not sure about the elongated ending, mimicking Hey Jude, the long ending of which was its weakest link. Perhaps. 8/10 (10/10 for the first four minutes)
What Is Life: decent pop song, though time has not treated it too kindly 7/10
If Not For You 9/10: lovely and way superior to Dylan's own version and also the bootleg Dylan/Harrison version which is slow and unrehearsed.
Behind That Locked Door: 10/10. A Harrison gem.
Let It Down: weak, over produced and I hate to say, forgettable 5/10
Run Of The Mill: 10/10 Another Harrison gem. Despite the negative lyrics (aimed at Paul?)
Beware Of Darkness. 10/10 Say no more. (What another gorgeous solo).
Apple Scruffs: 10/10 Ditto. A song for the fans.
Awaiting On You All: good fun, but over-produced 7/10
Let It Roll: mostly sublime 8/10
All Things Must Pass: Classic 10/10 (The Beatles attempt at this in 1969 is pathetic)
I Dig Love: weird but great 8/10
Art Of Dying: over-produced and not too much a song here in the first place but not bad 7/10.
Isn't It A Pity (Version 2): pointless 5/10
Hear Me Lord: sublime closer 9/10, such hearfelt lyrics! Where is the Bangla Desh 1971 live version (performed at the first concert)??
Apple Jam (all songs): self indulgent jam 3/10

So all in all, a bit of a classic n'est ce pas? :- ) I appreciated the lyrics being included, which did not happen with Paul's first, or Ringo's for that matter.

The best solo Beatles album ever? Very possibly. If not then very close. Worth 5 stars for the many highlights here :- )
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
VINE VOICEon 31 October 1999
In the dark days of 1970, this triple album, produced by Harrison and Phil Spector emerged as one of the first and at the time most expensive Beatle solo efforts. Subsequent solo albums from the other Beatles tended to overshadow the "Quiet One's" magnum opus. But like a good wine this album has had time to mature and is well worth revisiting.
"I'd Have you Anytime", co-written by Harrison and Bob Dylan, provides a gentle but beautiful kick off, followed by the infamous but still great "My Sweet Lord" (Phil Spector must have know what was going on!). Later on you get to hear the original and best version of "What is Life" used so effectively in 'Goodfellas' and most recently in 'Big Daddy', it's great track that has stood the test of time - better than some of its contempories. There's also the Dylan composition "If Not For you", covered at the time by Olivia Newton John. For the record, Harrison is in great voice and knocks Livvie's version into a cocked hat. "Apple Scruffs" is an affectionate nod towards the dedicated Beatle fans who used to congregrate wherever the Beatles held court, while "Awaiting on you All" heads into happy clappy, tambourine, gospel country. The real stonker is "The Art of Dying" that sees Clapton and Harrison sparring over a killer riff and a thunderous back beat. There's some great tracks in between but the remainder of the album is taken up by Apple Jam. Whether you like or loathe jam sessions will no doubt colour your opinion. Nevertheless any jam that includes Derek and the Dominoes, a couple of Beatles, Ginger Baker and the then Rolling Stones' brass section can't be all bad.
When All Things Must Pass was recorded, Harrison was on a creative high after 'Something' and 'Here Comes The Sun' If you want more of that give this album a chance and in the words of another George "listen without predjudice".
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12 of 13 people found the following review helpful
on 24 June 2006
"All Things Must Pass" was George Harrison's first real solo album ( the previous only contained instrumentals). Most of the songs were written while the Beatles were still existing, and George was writing so many great songs during the final years of the 1960's that, when the Beales finally folded in early 1970, he had songs enough for a double album. Eventually it turned out to be a triple album, with the 3rd record containing "jams" with George and his good friends, such as Eric Clapton, Dave Mason, Carl Radle and Jim Gordon.

Like most Harrison fans I regard "ATMP" as George finest album. Many of his greatest songs come from this LP. Though there is a great variety of styles and moods on the album, particularly the ballads stand out. Songs like "Isn't It a Pity", "Run of the Mill", "Behind That Locked Door", "Beware of Darkness" and "I'd Have You Anytime" are simply moving. His version of Dylan's "If Not For You" beats Dylan's own version by miles. Among the other up-beat number I especially like "What is Life". The bonus-track "I Live For You" is gem; incredible that this song was not originally included.

A lot of the acoustic guitars are played by Badfinger's Pete Ham and Tom Evans, who were two young very talented song-writers themselves and who had already witten the classic "Without You" at this time. For Pete Ham, who wrote Badfinger' greatest hit-records, Harrison may have been the biggest inspiration among the Beatles. There are many similarities among these two great musicians' songwriting and musical arrangements. Try listen to Badfinger's "Straight Up" album, which was partly produced by George.

This 2 CD set is must have for any Beatles or Badfinger fan!
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13 of 14 people found the following review helpful
on 22 November 2001
Still hauntingly brilliant music. Featuring at least 10 classics including "Beware of Darkness" which I think is George's best song and "What is Life" which would have made a great Beatles single.
Most of this music still sounds fresh and this remains probably the best album by any solo Beatle.
The bonus tracks are of mixed quality but include the superb "I Live For You" - how could this gem have lain unreleased for so long.
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
on 1 February 2001
George Harrison might have been the quiet Beatle but he had the advantage of building up a stock-pile of very good songs for his first proper solo album. "All Things Must Pass" is very good. Very good indeed.
With the albatross of The Beatles released from around his neck, George made an exquisite album that showed how much he had listened to Lennon and McCartney, and to The Band, Cream and, especially, Bob Dylan. Dylan is all over this album, notably on 'I'd Have You Anytime' and 'If Not For You', but also on 'Apple Scruffs'. If you thought Harrison was dour, think again. There are laughs on this album.
A re-release was long overdue. George merits his place in the history of rock, for 'Something' if nothing else. This album showed what he was capable of. I cannot hear it without being lifted by 'My Sweet Lord', 'Awaiting On You All' and 'All Things Must Pass'. The scintillating guitar on 'Art Of Dying' is worth the price alone.
With all wonderful things there is the problem of overindulgence. I shouldn't think anyone listens to the jams on the second CD much, but they will return again and again to the major songs. A wonderful album. Every home should have one.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on 8 October 2009
Having heard good reports of this album and the odd track I thought I'd take punt and get it.

After several listens my feelings are mixed. There is some out and out brilliance but it's let down by a lack of editing and overproduction.

In many ways it's much like The Beatles' white album... unfocussed and unedited. So let's talk about the good bits... well I'd say that most of the first disc is pretty good... focused with the better tracks towards the start... there is some sublime playing by George as well as Pete Drake on Pedal Steel really adding a new dimension to the sound on some tracks. The Dylan collaborations are excellent too, however venture onto Disc 2 and much of the disc sounds languid and lacking direction. Had George Harrison been more ruthless with his editing and left some of the tracks off this could have been a classic album.

What really lets the whole thing down is the additional jams that ramble on in endless tedium. Much as we love George's guitar work, his forte comes when he plays to structured pieces.

Let's face it... it's always going to be a struggle to produce something of the quality of the Beatles even when you were a quarter of them... and this is far in excess of 25% as good.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on 15 January 2002
All things must pass is the essential Harrison, full of beautiful songs which would have fit nicely on any Beatles album. What makes it different is the actual sound, on the whole much more austere and introspective in its setting, less "poppy" and "polished" than some songs on f.i. Abbey Road.
Most of the songs do not sound outdated, and are typically "gentle" Harrison songs. Notably exceptions are 'Wah Wah', "What is Life" and a few others, which are exuberant, full force songs. I actually like the much knocked "Original Jam" songs, which are in a way reminiscent of early 70, bluesy songs from group like Lynyrd Skynyrd, Derek& the Dominoes etc, but much more crafted. No freaking out and long, fast guitar solos, but really a good jam, with professional musicians, which did not annoy me. Then again, they don't add much to the 'serious' songs on teh album.
This album is essential benchmark Harrison, a standard which he seldom achieved later on. Brilliant songs, many of which are up to "something" and "here comes the sun" standards.
It will not be easy to be disappointed by this album.
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19 of 21 people found the following review helpful
on 10 July 2009
Others have already said what a superb album this is - and it is - one of the greats easily. But I think it's worth pointing out that the manner in which the songs are put in on the various CDs to me, ruin the package. I can understand putting the extra songs all at the end, or on a separate CD, but not being able to listen to the album as originally released is highly annoying.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
on 3 October 2000
"All Things must pass" is an amazing album. Tracks such as "I'd have you anytime", "Run of the mill" and the title track are outstanding. Although the second CD isn't as good as the first it still rates as the best solo Beatles album.
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