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12 of 13 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Chick Corea's Finest Hour, 30 Sep 2005
While Chick Corea is perhaps best known for his brief stint with Miles Davis, his trailblazing 70's fusion work with Return To Forever and his 80's and 90's work with Dave Weckl and John Patticuti in his Elektric Band, it's interesting to hear that his piano style (a weird fusion of latin jazz, free jazz, bebop, modern jazz and 20th century classical) was fully formed even on this early trio date, the one that perhaps best shows his musical direction before being forced into playing electric piano by Miles Davis and eventually going down the fusion route. The trio on this date has reformed several times and consists of Corea, Chezch bassist Miroslav Vitous (later of Weather Report) and (even then) veteran drummer Roy Haynes (famous for his work with Bud Powell among others). Opener 'Steps/What Was' perhaps exemplifies what a superb group this is with Chick Corea combining simple musical motifs with his own virtuoso playing and letting the rhythm section carry him into the stratosphere. I'm particulary fond of the transition between the two songs, by way of a fantastic Roy Haynes drum solo. The music bridges the gap between structured and free improvisation and the cd itself is packed with bonus tracks not on the original lp, further demonstating the ability of this trio, that must rank of one of the finest since Bill Evans, Scott LaFaro and Paul Motian's legendary combination.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars When the music was all that mattered, 4 April 2012
Exciting, courageous, invigorating, intense, provocative, touching, emotional, demanding, swinging, surprising, fresh, profound, humourous, dynamic, unpredictable, expansive, engaging, flawless, human....

Along with Dave Holland's 'Conference of the Birds', 'Now He Sings, Now He Sobs' remains one of the most accessible albums of an era in Jazz that demanded much of its audience but offered much more in return. For piano jazz fans, a must have. For rhythm section players, a must have. For everyone else? You can't get much more for the money.

Arguably Chick's finest moment.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Now he's not sure about this, now he is!, 15 May 2011
I saw this CD reviewed by a bassist feature in Bass Guitar Magazine. It was one of those CDs that took a few plays before I started liking it - now I love it. From a bassist's perspective, there are some really great tracks to get your ear around. If you're after something different, then give this a try.
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