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37 of 38 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Haunting Soundtrack
This album is the soundtrack to an amazing documentary made with footage from the apollo space missions. The music worked perfectly and powerfully in the documentary, but also works as an album too.
The first half is less musical - though it provides wonderful atmosphere and mood. The second half has some truly haunting moments in my opinion.
I would strongly...
Published on 14 May 2005 by Stephen Moore

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0 of 4 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars OK ENO
I bought this because I thought the soundtrack to the For All Mankind TV programme about the Apollo astronauts was so evocative.
Taken out of context it is less captivating, but a few of the tracks - particularly Under Stars, and An Ending (Ascent,)retain much of the dreamy quality. 'Side Two' is weaker with a lots of Hawiian guitar, and Weighlessness is surely...
Published on 6 Jan 2011 by Mr. A. D. Bickerstaffe


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37 of 38 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Haunting Soundtrack, 14 May 2005
This review is from: Apollo (Audio CD)
This album is the soundtrack to an amazing documentary made with footage from the apollo space missions. The music worked perfectly and powerfully in the documentary, but also works as an album too.
The first half is less musical - though it provides wonderful atmosphere and mood. The second half has some truly haunting moments in my opinion.
I would strongly reccomed this album if you have a taste for mood and ambience.
Similarly I would strongly reccomend the documentary, which is called 'For all Mankind'
A nice companion album to this one is Roger Eno's 'Voices'. Roger is Brian's brother and his album holds the remaining tracks used on the documentary, which are not featured on this one.
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25 of 26 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An ambient masterpiece, 19 Mar 2003
In some ways, Apollo reminds me of the soundtrack to ‘2001’. They’re certainly not similar in musical style, but what brings them together is their dense and pervasive atmosphere. They both exude an astonishing range of moods – fear, triumph, beauty, mystery – all coming from the dark recesses of the universe but ending up resonating deep inside a personal inner space.
Whereas Stanley Kubrick used existing music to such perfection to accompany the free and fictional exploration of Jupiter and beyond in ‘2001’, so Brian Eno crafted a haunting and beautiful space odyssey of his own to accompany the film of the NASA lunar missions.
The eclectic, electronic mix acts as a kind of aural planetarium, taking us on a cosmic tour where harmonious melodies sit next to tuneless soundscapes. Tracks such as The Secret Place and Matta show us deep, dark and menacing outer space, eerie and disturbing, where low rumbles are interspersed with industrial-like noises and wild animalistic sounds. The moon here is less a friendly and comforting neighbour and more an alien and inhospitable cold lump of rock.
It all adds up to bring home the terrifying insignificance and solitude of earth. Should we somehow lose our moorings and go floating – slowly, helplessly – off into the vast depths, it would be a far from pleasant experience.
But then it gently shifts to warmer tones as you drift along the dark side of the moon, weightless and free from apprehension. So far (and yet still so near) from civilisation and sensory overload that your thoughts can turn inwards to meditation and maybe even some slight comprehension. Well, maybe not, but it’s a wonderfully pleasant journey nonetheless.
And then you can lie on the moon’s surface gazing up without fear at the stars to the rich and tranquil twangs of Silver Morning, Deep Blue Day and Weightless. Alien, synthesiser-driven sounds give way, possibly somewhat jarringly, to more human sounding guitars, but the seams are quickly forgotten. Such tracks make you think of all that’s right in the universe, perhaps as you cast a fond glance back to the mother planet and reminisce about all the good times you’ve had.
It is, however, the transcendent beauty of An Ending (Ascent) that caps off the album, perhaps the closest you can get to a musical epiphany and a truly celestial track. Famous from its use in films such as ‘Traffic’ and ‘28 Days Later’, it’s the shining Orion of an already sparkling album. In its entirety, a deeply moving experience.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars EERIE AND BEUTIFUL, 5 Jun 2001
By A Customer
Everybody must of heard at least one track from this album, the beutiful track 'An Ending(Ascent)' has been used for the soundtrack of the televised N.S.P.C.C appeal advertisment for the last couple of years. It must be one of the most beutiful pieces of electronic music ever written and never fails to send shivers down my spine. And they say that Synthesiser music has no emotion,nonsense.I first heard this track and other numbers from this C.D. in a film on Sky called 'For all Mankind' an epic documentury about NASA's moonlandings and 'An Ending' has featured on many advertisments and programmes Space and non Space related ever since. There are other realy good tracks on this C.D.too.Silver Morning,Deep Blue Day,Weightless and Always returning where Brian Collaborates with old chum Daniel Laonis(the two went on to produce U2's Joshua Tree together)and brother Roger also stick out in my mind. And the other experemental pieces are very imaginative and very Eno. So if you have been ummming and arrring and wondering where that beutiful music on the N.S.P.C.C.advert is from thn this is the album. But remember to make a donation to the appeal too, it's a good cause.A nice album
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Ambient Classic, 17 May 2004
By 
Christopher Hunter "cjhunter2001uk" (Farnham UK) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (REAL NAME)   
This is one of Eno's best ambient works. Originally scored for a film of the Apollo mission the record consists of 'atmosphere' tracks such as 'Under Stars' and more structured pieces of music which have country influences (using steel guitar) to reflect the astronauts choice of listening material taken with them on some of the missions.
You will probably recognise some of the tracks as they tend to crop up on several film scores as well as documentaries and adverts. 'Ascent (an ending)' was recently used by the NSPCC for a fund raising campaign.
The record is rewarding listening being both relaxing and also rather unsettling at times such as in the track 'matta' where the proximity to death and risk comes through the music. It does accomplish it's task of reflecting the vastness of space in contrast to the humble backgrounds of many of the participants very well.
Being a film soundtrack this is not a seamless ambient experience but as a soundtrack which doesn't age and you will return to again and again you can't go much wrong!
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13 of 14 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An ambient masterpiece, 17 April 2003
In some ways, Apollo reminds me of the soundtrack to '2001'. They're certainly not similar in musical style, but what brings them together is their dense and pervasive atmosphere. They both exude an astonishing range of moods - fear, triumph, beauty, mystery - all coming from the dark recesses of the universe but ending up resonating deep inside a personal inner space.
Whereas Stanley Kubrick used existing music to such perfection to accompany the free and fictional exploration of Jupiter and beyond in '2001', so Brian Eno crafted a haunting and beautiful space odyssey of his own to accompany the film of the NASA lunar missions.
The eclectic, electronic mix acts as a kind of aural planetarium, taking us on a cosmic tour where harmonious melodies sit next to tuneless soundscapes. Tracks such as The Secret Place and Matta show us deep, dark and menacing outer space, eerie and disturbing, where low rumbles are interspersed with industrial-like noises and wild animalistic sounds. The moon here is less a friendly and comforting neighbour and more an alien and inhospitable cold lump of rock.
It is, however, the transcendent beauty of An Ending (Ascent) that caps off the album, perhaps the closest you can get to a musical epiphany and a truly celestial track. Famous from its use in films such as 'Traffic' and '28 Days Later', it's the shining Orion of an already sparkling album. In its entirety, a deeply moving experience.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent, 17 Nov 1999
By A Customer
I originally heard this music when watching the actual film of Apollo missions for which it was written. I have yet to hear music that so evokes the strangeness and wonder of space - only Kubrick's choice of classical music for 2001 comes close. However, the music is great on its own - you know, late night, lights off, glass of wine and your eyes closed. Roger Eno and Daniel Lanois also contribute to Eno's seemingly effortless ability to generate sounds and sensations that are memorable without any reverting to standard 'song writing' techniques. This album sits effortlessly beside his other ambient classics
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars As close to perfection as one can get through music, 14 Feb 2003
Like other reviewers, I spent a long time tracking down the amazing sequence of chords that I later found to be "Ascent, An Ending". I first heard them used at a planetarium during the middle 80's. I was immediately hooked.
To listen to this piece played in complete darkness is probably, if you are sensitive to such things, as close to perfection as it is possible to reach through music.
You'll either find the experience boring or absolutely uplifting; either way, it won't do you any harm. Give it a go.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Happily floating in space., 15 Dec 2005
By 
Elliot Davies "ahttt" (Liverpool, England) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Apollo (Audio CD)
I remember when I first got this album. I knew it was ambience, so I decided to listen to it in bed, bathed in total darkness. Well, I wouldn't recommend it. I was absolutely terrified. Sheer terror, as alien noises filled the room playing on the imagination and providing me with some horrific imagery. Really unnerving, this is definately an album that should only be enjoyed in a state of conciousness.
When actually awake, it's beautiful. You can happily drift away, feeling just like you're floating in space. Of course, the unnerving soundscapes remain (Matta), but they serve to provide balance. The rest is pure beauty. An Ending (Ascent) is one of the greatest pieces of ambient music ever produced, instantly recognisable. Deep Blue Day is equally renowned, it soundtracked Renton diving into a toilet in Trainspotting. However, my personal favourite moment is the beautiful steel guitar solo from Daniel Lanois in A Silver Morning.
Well recommended, this music will last forever.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars To the moon and on to heaven, 15 Dec 2005
By 
This review is from: Apollo (Audio CD)
Beautiful, wonderful ambient music that will repair your soul and replenish your spirit for human creativity. Brian Eno changes the face of music every time he releases music, no matter the genre, and this is no exception. Zero 7, Air and all you other pretenders listen up....here is the conception of their vision. It still sounds great and like no other 'ambient' concept album available today. Lie back and let this warm and comforting wave of simplistic beauty take over your life. Irresistible, essential and overwhelmingly emotional - you simply will not believe how Brian Eno can take you somewhere so beautiful with the most simplistic arrangements. Less is so much more.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Must have, 'An Ending', 25 Feb 2014
By 
Lortzz "airhead" (Launceston, Cornwall) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Apollo (Audio CD)
I heard 'An Ending' recently on a BBC 2 15 minute drama called, 'Letters of Service', about a 100-year-old psychiatric patient who cannot talk, and all that is known of him is his birth date and forename. His young nurse is quietly shown his shattering past via an extraordinary silent display. Morris Perry and Chloe Bale ably portray the main protagonists.The film is inspired by a true story. Brian Eno's wondrous music magnifies the soulfulness and buried grief. I was brought to silent tears by the sounds that evoke sadness; retrospection; a sense of wonder at eternity, and acceptance of our mortality. Staggering, that in the face of our continuing combativeness, viciousness and cruelty, some of us can still perceive and contemplate the better side of our existence by creating this phenomenon called music, to convey to each other what words cannot.
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Apollo
Apollo by Brian Eno
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