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26 of 28 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Stands the test of time
I guess the test of true song writing ability is when songs can sound as good today as when they were released 40 years ago (Hunky Dory was released in 1971). What can I say? One look at the track listing is enough to see how many classic Bowie songs are here - `Changes', `Oh! You pretty things', `Life on Mars?', `Kooks', `Andy Warhol', `Queen Bitch'. This is not to say...
Published on 11 July 2011 by G. Seabrook

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0 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Three Stars
Fills a spot in my collection.
Published 2 months ago by Peter S.


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26 of 28 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Stands the test of time, 11 July 2011
By 
G. Seabrook (Bristol) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Hunky Dory (Audio CD)
I guess the test of true song writing ability is when songs can sound as good today as when they were released 40 years ago (Hunky Dory was released in 1971). What can I say? One look at the track listing is enough to see how many classic Bowie songs are here - `Changes', `Oh! You pretty things', `Life on Mars?', `Kooks', `Andy Warhol', `Queen Bitch'. This is not to say the other songs aren't classics, but anyone who embraced Bowie whilst they were growing up will be as familiar with these tracks as the alphabet.

So what does `Hunky Dory' Remastered (released in 1999) give us that's new? To be honest, I'm not sure! I'm familiar with Bowie probably most on record and tape. That probably gives me an age of 100 or something. What's my point? Well, you obviously don't get the scratches and hiss of the aforementioned medium, but you still get the same songs. Classics. If that makes me a heathen then I'm guilty as charged.

`Hunky Dory' is a listening delight, remastered or otherwise. Stand out tracks? I'm going to pick out one amongst the many. This probably changes on a daily basis, but with a gun to my head I'd have to say `Queen Bitch'. It's got a killer riff, with a rock staccato feel that leaves you bouncing off the walls.

Enjoy folks.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The First of Bowie's Great Albums, 22 May 2014
By 
Mr. Peter Steward "petersteward" (Norwich, England) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Hunky Dory (Audio CD)
This is the first of the great trio of Bowie albums that continued with Ziggy Stardust and Aladdin Sane. I can't think of a mainstream artist who has produced three such perfect examples of their art in succession. Ziggy Stardust is generally accepted as the best of the three, but I disagree. For me Hunky Dory was the pinnacle of Bowie's songwriting ability. It is a quieter more sophisticated album than Man Who Sold The World.

I first saw Bowie live in Harlow, Essex, somewhere between Hunky Dory and Ziggy Stardust. I have memories of Bowie playing the first half of the set at the piano featuring much of the material from Hunky Dory before unveiling the Spiders for an electric Ziggy set for the second half. This album attacks the senses like virtually no other. It has a feel of greatness about it. Great albums have no weaknesses. This is a great album. For sometime I never got past the first side of the album - it was that good. I continually played Changes, Oh You Pretty Things, Life on Mars, Kooks and then went back to play them again. It was only later on that I realised that there were gems on side two as well. Songs of passion - the art school feel of Andy Warhol and Song for Bob Dylan and The Bewley Brothers was just one of those songs that confused but amazed.

Above all the thing that makes Hunky Dory a great album is the atmosphere it emits. Bowie has hauled himself back from the edge of insanity as suggested by the Man Who Sold The World and turned into the consummate songwriter - more outward going and less introverted and ready to move into the next phase of his life - a strange spaceman ready to change the rock map for ever. I almost look upon Hunky Dory as Bowie's folk album.
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14 of 16 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars If you stay you won't be sorry, 6 Jun 2010
By 
Tealady2000 (Edinburgh) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Hunky Dory (Audio CD)
Until recently I only had a Bowie compilation CD in my collection (Roxy Music were my 70s idols) but I have rectified that with Hunky Dory. The two massive hits here are 'Changes' and 'Life on Mars?' but in no way do these classics prepare for you for the other British folky hippy delights on this album. There's a real mix of styles here and Rick Wakeman's piano playing is great. I love 'Oh You Pretty Things' and I can't help wondering if any baby ever had a more touching and charming song written for him than 'Kooks'. Buy the CD rather than the MP3 download as you get the booklet with all the lyrics plus the utterly bizarre Pharaoh photos and the hand-written track listings on the back.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Hunky Dory, 1 Nov 2009
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David Bowie's 1971 album "Hunky Dory", what a fantastic album, even though most the songs are ballads, this is a nice soulful lovely album to listen to. The singles include "Changes" & "Life On Mars?"

I will rate the tracks and explain why:-

1. Changes 10/10 - This is the 1st ballad of the album. This song is very well known. The piano work in this song is really great and the chorus is really fast paced.

2. Oh! You Pretty Things 10/10 - the 2nd ballad on the album. This song is just wow really, lovely piano work, lovely lyrics, lovely chorus, everything is just fantastic.

3. Eight Line Poem - 10/10 - This song is the 3rd ballad on the album. This song really shows emotion and lyrics. This song doesn't really have a chorus, just a8 line poem like the title says really.

4. Life On Mars? 10/10 - This is the 4th ballad on the album. This is my personal favourite song on this song. The lyrics are fantastic, the chorus is sooo good, this song has a great guitar solo in the middle.

5. Kooks 10/10 - This song isnt what i would call a ballad, its more pop then a ballad, the song is about the birth of Duncan Jones (born 1971) David Bowie's son. It's a nice paced song with lovely lyrics and a nice chorus.

6. Quicksand 10/10 - This is the 5th ballad on the album. This song is really lovely, the lyrics and piano work is really good, and i love the end of each verse "I'm sinking in the quicksand of my thought and I ain't got the power anymore".

7. Fill Your Heart 10/10 - This is the 6th ballad on the album. This song isn't a too bad track. The lyrics are really thoughtful and emotional. Really is a good track to listen to.

8. Andy Warhol 8/10 - This song is about Andy Warhol, it isn't a too bad song, but i would say that this song can be a bit boring, cos the chorus is sang all the time. I would say this is the worst song on the album.

9. Song For Bob Dylan 10/10 - This is the 7th ballad on the album. This song is good i think, the piano work, the lyrics, the chorus, its just brilliant, worth a listen too.

10. Queen Bitch 10/10 - This song is really rocky. This song has a alot of guitar in it, and is really good to listen to. Great lyrics, great chorus, great guitar.

11. The Bewlay Brothers 10/10 - This is the 8th and last ballad on the album. This song has great lyrics & Chorus. This is a guitar ballad.

In conclusion, i think this album is fantastic if you like ballads a lot and 70s music. This song has 8 ballads and 3 non-ballad songs. This album is worth buying, you be singing to it and everything, if your a Bowie fan, this album si for you, to complete the collection.
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5.0 out of 5 stars David's Mellow Folk And Piano Based Gem., 4 Nov 2006
By 
Jervis - See all my reviews
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David Bowie has always worked with a larger musical canvas than most of his contempories that has incorporated a host of often diverse styles. However, on occasions this has resulted in perhaps a certain (maybe justified) accusation of David appearing maybe a touch pretentious, or at the very least a little contrived. However, what i find so appealing about 'Hunky Dory' is the fact that it very much lacks many of those grand designs and the sound is much related to that of folk, certainly in its musical origins, and a much more mellow piano based sound where greater importance appears to be placed on melodic and lyrical matters. It's certainly a lot more varied in style than many of the singer-songwriters output of the time (early seventies) but it does contain those common elements (melody, lyrical importance) that would become less fundamental to David as the decade progressed.
The emphasis on lyrics found on much of the album is not too far removed from the more densely detailed style of Bob Dylan. David even names a song after him (Song For Bob Dylan) as a means as a tribute, alongside his other musical favourites Andy Warhol and the Velvet Underground - the rocker 'Queen Bitch' being a terrific tribute to the Velvets.
The lyrics to the opening track 'Changes' is an indication that even at this stage in David's career he didn't intend staying in one place too long.
In retrospect 'Hunky Dory' is a clear indication of what David Bowie was all about as many of the elements found here would be a template for what was to come in the future - it certainly laid the foundations for Ziggy Stardust, although 'Hunky Dory' also maintained a mellow folk influence which didn't feature on David's follow up release. Ziggy was the fully realised version of what David was working towards here although Ziggy was a lot more of a theatrical concept, which although showed David working a lot more to his own visual/theatrical ideals, ultimately lacks some of the musical depth/substance found here.
For me 'Hunky Dory' is a lot more satisfying - it is more deeply stimulating both lyrically and melodically, and perhaps even more enduring than much of his later work (certainly in a more conventional sense), including 'Ziggy ....'. It's David very much stripped of his later bombast, and in being so it is possibly more easy to relate to on more general terms and by more of the general public.
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18 of 22 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The best album by anyone, anywhere, anytime, 20 Feb 2007
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This review is from: Hunky Dory (Audio CD)
I bought Ziggy Stardust when it was released, took it round to my mate's to play and he'd already bought a copy, so I took mine back & swapped it for Hunky Dory. Did I get the better of that deal? This is the last of the great hippy albums, before everything went glam rock. It's thoughtful, introspective, brilliantly lyricised, truly romantic and beautiful in spades.
For me this is the best album ever, quite an accolade when you look at the contenders. It's populated by sensitively textured characters - spectral Bewlay brothers, scratchy\clawing Robert Zimmermans, cement fixed Andy Warhols and Clara puts her head between her paws (and more). Twice as good as Ziggy, Three times better than Diamond Dogs, Alladin Sane or Man Who Sold the World (or the oft overlooked Pin-ups)and ten times better than Heroes or Let's Dance or Young Americans. I know Bowie's chameleon, comedian, corinthian and caricature but this is an intimate facet rarely seen, before the fame kicked in, and is truly a flawless collection of fine vintage songs. Drink them in and enjoy
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5.0 out of 5 stars 'She's seen it ten times or more', 16 Aug 2008
By 
Pieter Uys "Toypom" (Johannesburg) - See all my reviews
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Hunky Dory was Bowie's last album as an aspirant, just before he found fame with Ziggy Stardust. It's a fascinating work on many levels that display lyrical depth, vivid imagery, wit and great musical variety, from the music hall pop of Changes through the sixties pop of Oh You Pretty Things to the cinematic lyricism of Life On Mars, a soaring masterpiece. Another of my favorites is Fill Your Heart, a quirky number with his somersaulting voice over lively piano and cheeky sax. Elements of the folkie singer/songwriter are evident on numbers like Song For Bob Dylan while The Supermen reminds me of his later science fiction work like Diamond Dogs. Bowie also salutes Lou Reed and Andy Warhol here, in fact the whole album makes references to his musical influences. Hunky Dory is a bridge between his earlier music hall style and the glamrock that was to follow, and this was just the right mixture of catchy tunes & brilliant lyrics to ensure a timeless classic. This edition includes two extra tracks: alternate takes of Bewlay Brothers & Quicksand.
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11 of 14 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Bowie's best, 5 April 2007
By 
S J Buck (Kent, UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Hunky Dory (Audio CD)
This classic album from 1971 is one of Bowie's very best albums. It was largely forgotten with the success of Ziggy Stardust, but unlike that later fantasy themed album, this album references some of Bowie's idols and contains as many classic tracks as Ziggy.

Take three out of the first four tracks: 'Changes', 'Oh! You Pretty Things' and 'Life on Mars'. Has there been a stronger start to album than that? There is brilliant song-writing both lyrically and musically on little known songs like 'Song for Bob Dylan'. Bowie describes Dylan as "with a voice like sand and glue" then later that he "put the fear in a whole lot more".

Musically this is basically the Ziggy Stardust band but with the oddball extra of Rick Wakeman on Piano. This album was recorded a year or two before Rick Wakeman started his own successful career, and if you've been listening to this album as long as I have you can't imagine it without the Piano. Wakeman's Piano is most prominent on 'Fill your Heart" which is the only song Bowie didn't write.

As with most Bowie albums this is a marvellously perverse mixture. Take 'Quicksand' for example, this has a wonderfully catchy chorus but the lyrics are all about getting closer to death - "knowledge comes with deaths release".

The remaster is excellent and the album sounds as good as I've ever heard it. A must have for any serious rock music collection.
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22 of 28 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars More than just a pretty face..., 1 April 2005
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1971 was a very productive year for Bowie he had signed to RCA, and now he had an American lawyer Tony Defries as his manager who with his "Mainman" company was building Bowie to be the next big thing.
"Hunky Dory" was recorded at Trident Studios in London with the Bowie assisting Ken Scott with the production.
Wakeman's piano, Ronson and Bowie's acoustic guitar dominate the album, with the sound of Ronson's string arrangements on "Life on Mars?" and the easy listening "Changes" which give the tracks more depth.
The easy listening doesn't take away the from disturbing imagery on songs such as "Oh you pretty Things", Hunky Dory the title alone is misleading as it hides fact the album is a collection of attractive melodies, seductive arrangements and choruses with the juxtaposition of lyrics which for the most part where as complex as the previous album, which had attacked with a full frontal assault of the audio kind with the heavy power trio of Ronson, Woodmansey and Visconti, now with the release of this album the songs came gift-wrapped in prettiness you the listener are taken off guard, which leaves you wide open for the observations, and predictions of the material.
The opening track of the collection "Changes" starts with the elegant piano sound of Wakeman and Ronson's string arrangement, these set the scene for the verses and stuttering chorus, Ch-Ch-Changes would become an organising principle for Bowies music, he neatly states in the song "Look out all you Rock and Rollers", for him rock was done from the outside as an actor and never becoming a rocker in reality just passing comment and watching from afar.
"Changes" has never been a hit but is included in any "best of" or "greatest hits" that record companies put together such is the popularity of the track.
"Oh you Pretty Things" sounds "McCartneyesque" in construction but if you listen closely to the words with it's reference to "Cracks in the sky" indications of split personality reveal a man ready for the psychiatrist's couch. This song segues into "Eight line Poem", which is a hushed still life with Ronson's light country style guitar, this is framed by Bowies piano chords which is the perfect backdrop for Bowie's parody of an American singing style that most of his contemporaries where using at the time, the theory being if you sounded American you got closer to the blues master print and so you sounded more authentic.
" Life on Mars?" is a masterwork where the song is built around delicate piano playing which collides with the guitar sound of Ronson along with his huge string arrangement.
Bowie weaves a tale of a world where the heroine of the song attempts to escape her existence by going to the movies, only to discover that the film she is watching is her life, as she watches she sees herself going to the cinema, as a paradox the song returns to the scene of urban chaos with Bowie exclaiming, "Oh man! Look at those cavemen go, it's the freakiest show .... is there life on Mars?" Listen very carefully and you can hear the chords from "My way" the standard written for Sinatra.
Respite is provided by "Kooks" which is a warning to his son Zowie with the line "And if you ever have to go to school don't pick any fights with the bullies or the cads", " Cause I'm not much cop at punching other people's dads" he tells his son not to draw attention to himself.
The mood of "Kooks" is darkened with "Quicksand" which deals with the futility of the human condition and how the philosophies he follows of Zen, Homo Superior and the occult clash and the fact that fascism came from similar roots, this is over 12 string guitar, this song works because of one of the most moving melodies of any Bowie song, the line "playing in a silent film" he is setting himself up as a bit-part actor waiting for a starring role.
The song "Fill your Heart" this is a track written by the song writing team of Biff Rose and Paul Williams. The words read like some forgotten Hippy manifesto with its talk of "happiness is here today and lovers with minds free of thoughts unkind", in view of Bowies own lyric content is ironic as the other songs on the collection glorify individualism and self absorption, this doesn't take any from the fact that it's a damm fine pop song.
Bowie has never hid his influences so with "Andy Warhol" he paid homage to Warhol,
The track itself studio backchat at the start and some Ronson and Bowie Spanish-styled guitar work in the middle 8.
"Song for Bob Dylan" is the song on the album that just doesn't work; Bowie doesn't know whether to parody Dylan or just be himself, the redeeming fact of the song is that it has a catchy melody and a winning chorus.
"Queen Bitch" is probably the best song that Lou Reed didn't write, if you read the back cover of the album it says in brackets (some V.U. white light returned with thanks) it's a tale of cross-dressing and gay love set against the power chords of Ronsons guitar, with the line "She so swishy in her satin and tat in her frock coat and bipperty-bopperty hat, Oh God I could do better than that", is Bowie pleading or making a statement?
The finale is one of the important songs in Bowies back catalogue as it deals in fictional form with his relationship with his late half-brother Terry, "The Bewlay Brothers", the track evidently means a great deal to him as he named his music publishing company after the track, only recently has Bowie begun performing the song live.
An album that grows with time and has a lot more depth than would seem on the first listening, an essential part of any Bowie collection...
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5.0 out of 5 stars Hunky Dory Rocks, 1 Dec 2002
By 
This review is from: Hunky Dory (Audio CD)
'Hunky Dory' has got to be Bowie's finest album yet along with 'The Rise and Fall Ziggy Stardust & The Spiders from Mars', 'Space Oddity' and 'Aladdin Sane'. Every song on it is superb from 'Changes' to 'The Bewlay Brothers'. I disagree entirely with people who say it's Bowie's worst product, it has brilliant tracks such as 'quick sand', 'Fill your heart' (my personal favourite) and 'kooks'. Before I had listened to this album I hadn't heard any of his songs before, since then I have cherished his music like my bible. Give this album to any Bowie hater and they will be buying his albums for the rest of their life. A great album from a great man.
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Hunky Dory by David Bowie
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