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46 Reviews
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79 of 84 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Book title needs refactoring
This is a great book, and one which any developer will learn a great deal from. In most respects, it is a five-star book, but... the title is misleading. By rights it should be called "Clean Java Code".

Let me explain: I am an ActionScript developer, and bought this book to improve my code style and structure. For the most part, it has done that: the chapters...
Published on 27 Oct. 2008 by Mr. D. N. Sumption

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85 of 93 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Scattergun list of pet peeves
This book is best described as a list of "pet peeves" by the authors. I stress that this book is mainly written by a collection of authors - and not Robert C. Martin - because this is not stated in any promotional material and appears as an unwelcome surprise in the introduction of many chapters.

The first chapter pledges a lot and is very motivational -...
Published on 31 Dec. 2009 by Samuel Halliday


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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Essential Book For Developers, 21 Jan. 2011
This book is quite simple:

You read it.

You start to think differently about your code.

You start to write better code.

By the time you finish this book, you will be a better developer. The examples are in Java, but you can translate the concept easily into any modern language. I am starting to apply this way of thinking to C#, PHP and JavaScript and the concepts work.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A five star book in a four star cover, 21 Jan. 2009
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Mr. R. J. Jepps "Richard Jepps" (Cambridge UK) - See all my reviews
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This book has a great summary chapter - Chapter 17. I read this first and decided to read the rest of the book even though there wasn't much I hadn't come across before.

The book really is very readable and covers a lot of ground, generally at intermediate developer level. Advanced developers won't come across anything new, however there is a lot of good advice in one place. This is generally clearly explained with some examples that hint at the level of simplicity that can be achieved in production code with a bit of extra time and a lot of extra effort.

The Law of Demeter is explained with the usual lack of clarity, but there is enough supporting material that I finally understood what it is really about - everything within a scope should be at the same level of abstraction. It was a bit of a revelation when the implications started to sink in.

The Formatting chapter has some interesting insights into the rationale of some of the formatting techniques that I developed naturally over more than 20 years of writing code.

The sub-title reads "A Handbook of Agile Software Craftsmanship". There is the odd nod in the Agile direction, but the text is much more about software craftsmanship than it is about agile, and none the worse for it.

I've already lent the book to one of my colleagues, and I hope to get it back before too long.

Unusually for a Prentice Hall publication the editing is not as good as it should be, and the cover is cheap - it had a distinctive curl after the first reading stint. This is a shame as it's a book that needs to be passed around.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Mostly Great, 19 Jan. 2010
By 
Christopher Turner (Berkshire, UK) - See all my reviews
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There's no denying that this is a great book. It's easy to read, has some great examples and is a must for every developer. I will certainly be keeping this title on my desk and referring back to it regularly. Having 15 years experience of software development, there wasn't much that I found to be startlingly new, but it was nice to have all the guidelines listed in one excellent source. I have certainly cleaned up my code since reading this book and corrected some sloppy practices that I had fallen in to.

That said, there are a number of reasons why this could not be given a 5-start rating:

Firstly the chapters on concurrency seem like a waste of space in this title. There are many better books on writing concurrent code and I didn't find anything in the concurrency chapters specific to clean code that wasn't covered elsewhere in the book.

Secondly, I felt that in some cases the book was preaching a single correct way of working for some highly subjective and debatable coding styles. While I respect the author's opinion on this, a bit more time spent on debating the different options might have helped with understanding the authors intentions and point of view. Since reading this book I've tried to convert a number of colleagues to the rules in this book but have often found the lack of advantages and argument points a real hinderance in getting them on board.

Finally, the case study chapters that form the second half of this book could be better. The introduction promise these to be 'intensely challenging, taking days'. I was expecting some really challenging puzzles and questions to work through. Instead you are just presented with before and after style listings and a brief discussion of the rationale used to transform from one to the other. As a strong Java developer, the code was easy to follow and the refactorings quite obvious. I managed to work my way through all the case studies in a couple of hours with no problem - slightly disappointing given the promise of the introduction.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A must-read, 10 May 2009
A great book about coding style, that I recommend to every software developer.

Some of the guidelines are just common sense, but the resulting picture is amazing. The book is well-organized and the writing style is pleasing. The most important aspects about writing good quality code are pointed out throughout the entire book, and will stick into your mind. Once you are done reading it, you will probably forget the smallest details but you will definitely write better code. Later you will be able to refresh your memory just reading the last chapter, that is indeed a summary of best practice.

As someone pointed out on other reviews, the examples in this book are written in Java, but it should not be a problem for a book about clean code. All you have to understand is the Java syntax, and that is something that every programmer should be able to learn easily.

One last note: I don't see why the author wrote the two chapters on concurrent programming, since there are far better titles on that subject, but the five stars stand anyway.
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7 of 9 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Above Average Coding book, with some poor examples, 28 April 2009
By 
Daniel Byer "DdanB" (UK) - See all my reviews
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A decent enough manual, with some good basic beginners stuff. Couple of worrying examples ( e.g. code simply consuming exceptions and returning empty vectors as if nothing has gone wrong - perhaps there was a context for it but I think it encourages a poor approach to exception handling - if you cant deal with it don't consume it!).

For more advanced stuff I would advise "Joel on software" , which whilst older feels like it has a lot more genuine developer experience wedged inside it.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Hands on experience from a professional, 10 Feb. 2014
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Experience is the most important feature for a software engineer, but it might take years to build. This book gives you a practical approach on how to face every day problems, so your code is cleaner and easier to read. Cleaner code results in better, more concrete solutions, which are easier to test and maintain. Don't expect a revelation. It's just a nice book to make you put all those little things you've figured out or will figure out yourself in order.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Must-have, 9 Nov. 2013
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Every programmer who wants to be considered a good one should read this book. It's sometimes not easy to make the software work, but maintaining ugly code is simply impossible. So if you want your software to last long, take a look at this book and apply some tips and guidelines into your code and coding habits.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Great Book. A must have for software engineers, 11 Dec. 2012
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This review is from: Clean Code: A Handbook of Agile Software Craftsmanship (Kindle Edition)
I have recently bought this book and i have to say that is a must have for every software developer, experienced or novice. It is well written, provoking you to think (not only read), with examples and situations that everyone has encountered. Keep up the good work.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Succinct General Coding Guidance, 12 Mar. 2014
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This review is from: Clean Code: A Handbook of Agile Software Craftsmanship (Kindle Edition)
Very readable, easily digested guidance. If you've ever watch the Uncle Bob videos you'll enjoy this book. Covers all the usual coding advice, loose coupling, high-cohesion, law of Demeter etc. Has a handy list of the ~30 code smells at the back.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Essential for any programmer, 20 Mar. 2015
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D. A. Cameron (Surrey, England) - See all my reviews
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Every developer must read this. My advice, though, is unless you like reading Java code dumps: skip the middle section. Read the first half dozen chapters, and the appendices. Skip the case studies. That said, it is still a must read. It's gold.
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