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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Brilliant in Blu-Ray
The Mask, for those of you who haven't seen it, is a hilarious film about a hapless young bank clerk (Jim Carrey) who secretly admires a beautiful singer (Cameron Diaz). He sees a "dead body" floating in the river and dives in to save it. It turn out to be simply a pile of junk and "The Mask". The mask itself contains a mischeivous character called Loki who's personality...
Published on 7 Aug 2009 by Chris Webb

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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Classic Jim Crazy
This is Jim Carrey on top form: restrained but manic as Stanley Ipkiss, and totally unstoppable as The Mask, without being as sickening as he was in the second Ace Ventura film. The plot is fairly simple, and all the better for it. The bad guys are disposable but their presence is felt nonetheless. And Cameron Diaz (of whom I've never been a fan) is undeniably smoldering...
Published on 26 Aug 2008 by Paul McNamee


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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Brilliant in Blu-Ray, 7 Aug 2009
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This review is from: The Mask [Blu-ray] (Blu-ray)
The Mask, for those of you who haven't seen it, is a hilarious film about a hapless young bank clerk (Jim Carrey) who secretly admires a beautiful singer (Cameron Diaz). He sees a "dead body" floating in the river and dives in to save it. It turn out to be simply a pile of junk and "The Mask". The mask itself contains a mischeivous character called Loki who's personality comes out in anyone wearing the mask. The rest is a madcap comedy that is well worth watching. The Blu-ray experience just makes the film even better.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Ageless... and Timeless, 13 April 2007
This review is from: The Mask [DVD] [1994] (DVD)
Watching the film again some... 13 years after I first saw it, I just realised how good it is. I mean, the settings, the music used - that could be ANY city, ANY time, ANY place, ANY where (if you ignore the American accents :p I always imagine it to be set in New York, but whatever!) and the gags and visuals used, appeal to all ages - some of the more obvious jokes I found funny at aged 5, whereas some of the subtler and more adult jokes I find funny now (aged 18) - there's something for everyone on it; there's just something about this story that is timeless - people will always be amazed by magic, people will always yearn to be something they are not - more confident, more appealing, more lucky in love, and this film is basically using all those elements, using great young actors (that were, back then) and the freshest talent, a great director and a fantastic plot and story line. Since buying the DVD I have seen it four times, twice with the ordinary audio, and once with the different audio commentaries. The Special Features, however, are a bit poor, but from a media student's perspective, it gives a very good and detailed insight into working in the business, and the shortcomings and frustrations of filming.

The soundtrack - what can I say! Jazz and swing, and the whole art deco feel of places like the Coco Bongo night club - it's just got a whole 1920s, yet modern, feel to it - it's very asthetically pleasing, and... well, it's one of my favourite films of all time - truly ageless, and timeless
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Vivacious mastery of fantasy and star power, 24 Mar 2010
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This review is from: The Mask [DVD] [1994] (DVD)
Unlucky banker Stanley Ipkiss (Carrey) discovers a mask in a river that gives him superpowers at night.

The film that launched Cameron Diaz into our hearts and lives is also one of the more forgotten Jim Carrey masterpieces of slapstick comedy.

When son of the mask was released 5 years ago it was slated as destroying the original concept of this film and ruining the family entertainment value of cinema and whereas plans for a sequel were originally thought up in the 90's this is a film best left alone as a sheer conceptual mind blast.

Opening with an attempt at cementing some mystical origin, a scuba diver uncovers a case where the mask floats away and our adventure begins.

Converting to the interior of an average bank we see Carrey's ordinary Joe conversing with a friend about concert tickets and is attire and laid back attitude instantly recognises as a push over who has no romantic socialism. Therefore cue a fresh face to give the film a far fetched romantic premise and we have a new star on our screens.

Cameron Diaz, shot in one of the best making career openings ever (Megan Fox has nothing on this) director Chuck Russell chooses a soaking 20 something Diaz walking through the door before cutting back to Richard Jeni's beautifully spoken "Hold the phone" before switching back to the entrance and zooming in and then up to allow Diaz flicking her hair and walking confidently and purposefully towards the two star struck bankers. A moment of pure genius and idolism. As far as performances go, Diaz certainly generates the right mood for this picture, being perfectly innocent and charming, a figure looking for friendship and love, and the American certainly chances her own splendid dancing and witty humour. Whilst her comedy persona has improved through films such as My best friend's wedding this was a film that begun her road to stardom.

Choosing a normal average bored character in day to day rota Carrey expands on the conventional through true wacky styling when the mask is in place. There are occasions when there is an over step of eccentric portrayal, on the park bench for example, but the majority has viewers siding with his spontaneous mischievousness. Not to forget Carrey is able to capitalise on the script through splendid catchphrases and facial expressions.

The script itself is a good vs evil eventuality that adds some spice and tension in the final third whilst constantly having us smiling and laughing along with the array of familiar villains and good guys.

A quick mention of the score by Randy Edelman which has a way of capturing the moment of vivaciousness perfectly whilst being sentimental when required.

It may have flaws of over exuberance and a formula of eventual outcome but this is a joyous ride of passion and vigour that is certainly worth catching as a reminder of Carrey's brilliance.

8/10
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Classic Jim Crazy, 26 Aug 2008
By 
Paul McNamee "Rambleast Reviews" (North Ireland) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: The Mask [DVD] [1994] (DVD)
This is Jim Carrey on top form: restrained but manic as Stanley Ipkiss, and totally unstoppable as The Mask, without being as sickening as he was in the second Ace Ventura film. The plot is fairly simple, and all the better for it. The bad guys are disposable but their presence is felt nonetheless. And Cameron Diaz (of whom I've never been a fan) is undeniably smoldering in her debut role. The one liners are zany, for lack of a better word, and for fans of cartoon humour this is a must.
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16 of 18 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Fantastic film, poor DVD, 12 Oct 2004
This review is from: The Mask [DVD] [1994] (DVD)
I absolutely love this movie. It's the best cartoon ever, but in live-action - it's funny, madcap, enthralling, romantic, exciting and all the rest. It's the perfect movie for children, but anyone would enjoy it. I would whole-heartedly recommend this movie to anyone - Charles "Chuck" Russell did a great job, redeeming himself for Nightmare on Elm Street 3, and his special effects department and actors really made the film special.
The problem is, though, that this DVD really doesn't do the brilliant film justice. I don't normally notice the sound quality in films - my ears aren't that great and I only have stereo speakers anyway, so I don't usually mind the sound in films that others condemn to the pits of hell. This dvd is an exception. For some reason, totally unknown to me, it goes quiet, loud, quiet, loud, regardless of the on-screen action. This is particularly annoying and noticeable during the otherwise brilliant dance numbers. Also the speech occasionally slips out of lip-sync. These problems aren't enough to really spoil your enjoyment of The Mask, but they are worth mentioning all the same.
Otherwise the disc is OK - extras include interview bites with all the important cast members (Jim Carrey, Cameron Diaz, Max the Dog) and brief B-reels and making-of documentaries. There is also a trailer, cast profiles and a commentary by the director. Note: no alternative langauges or subtitles.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Carey at his utmost best, 23 May 2007
This review is from: The Mask [DVD] [1994] (DVD)
One of Jim Carrey's greatest comedy films. Jim Carrey plays Stanley Ipkiss, a lonely guy (who likes cartoons) who works at a bank. One day with his friend Charlie he meets Tina Carlyle (introducing Cameron Diaz). Then at night when driving home he thinks he sees a body in the water, but it isn't. But on this "body" Stanley finds an ancient mask. It's when Stanley puts the mask on that Carrey displays his slapstick with the help of some convincing computer animation. This mask turns him into a mad cartoon like hero. When an evil Dorian Tyrell (Peter Greene) sees "The Mask" with his girlfriend, Tina, he is wanting to get the mask to help him with his plan to take over Edge City. A very interesting romantic comedy with brilliant computer effects
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10 of 12 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Jim Carrey and his elasticated face..., 6 Dec 2002
By 
Shaun (Hailsham, England) - See all my reviews
This review is from: The Mask [DVD] [1994] (DVD)
Yet another film is made by the hilarious facial expressions of Jim Carrey. The visage gymnastics that this man can execute can not be criticized by any critic- it is a unique talent that really does not cease from entertaining the public.
"The Mask", as a film resembles a comic book in several ways, not only is Jim Carrey always a character straight from a cartoon strip but it is a film full of colour and typical cartoon humour containing a barrel load of stupendously childish yet funny one-liners that even the most grown up of adults cannot help but laugh at.
The storyline is very energetic, Stanley Ipkiss (Jim Carrey) is just your average man until he finds the mask that completely transforms him into an over-the-top, stylish character straight from a comic book with no morals whatsoever, to put it frankly there are no restrictions for what the new Stanley Ipkiss can accomplish. Despite his apparent arrogance, he works out that he actually is a "superhero" to an extent. So obviously he will use his newly equipped "super powers" any way he can resulting in outrageously witty scenes.
Computer Graphics are obviously used for the film's animation and it works a treat giving some great effects and lots of bold colours increasing the comic effect.
Clearly Jim Carrey gives one of the best performences of his career but it is not only him as a major actor talent who stars in the film. For it is the first big time appearence for the now superstar Cameron Diaz, she is used well as the heroine and indeed lives up to her role in now typical Diaz manner, performing superbly. An other memorable show would be from Peter Riegret who plays the irritant and petulant police officer who can never truely believe what is going on during the course of the film.
Whether comedy is your prefered genre or not, "The Mask" is definately worthy of a watch. Feast on a comic book creation being transferred onto the big screen in an all time "Carrey classic", this film will definately bring out your childish side.
85/100
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5.0 out of 5 stars The Mask – From Zero To Hero [1994] [Blu-ray] [US Import], 26 Sep 2013
The Mask – From Zero To Hero [1994] [Blu-ray] [US Import] JIM CAREY IS S-S-SMOKIN’ AS THE MASK!

Imagine a cyclone, a Tex Avery cartoon come to life as a zoot-suited fashionista and the wiggy energy of a vat full of jumping beans and that still doesn’t capture Jim Carey’s comic genius as Stanley Ipkiis, a repressed bank clerk who goes from zero to hero when he dons The Mask. The mysterious mask Stanley finds allows him to do what he normally can’t – like woo Tina [Cameron Diaz] and beat the baddies. Beneath all that loopy fun is the film’s heart: Does Stanley really needs the mask to be the person he longs to be? Flat-out smokin’

FILM FACT: The film was nominated for Best Visual Effects at the 67th Academy Awards, but lost to Forrest Gump. In addition, Carrey was nominated for a Golden Globe. Conversely, he was also nominated for a Razzie Award for "Worst New Star". The Mask was also nominated for the American Film Institute's 10 Top 10 list as a fantasy film, and the Mask's quote "Somebody stop me!" was nominated for 100 Years...100 Movie Quotes, but neither of them made the list.

Cast: Jim Carrey, Cameron Diaz, Peter Greene, Richard Jeni, Peter Riegert, Jim Doughan, Amy Yasbeck, Orestes Matacena, Nancy Fish, Tim Bagley, Johnny Williams, Reginald E. Cathey, Denis Forest, Ivory Ocean, Joely Fisher, Ben Stein, Jeremy Roberts and Milo [Jack Russell Terrier]

Director: Chuck Russell

Producers: Ann Burgund, Carla Fry, Chuck Russell, Michael De Luca, Mike Richardson and Robert Engelman

Screenwriters: Mark Verheiden, Michael Fallon and Mike Werb

Composer: Randy Edelman

Cinematography: John R. Leonetti

Resolution: 1080p

Aspect Ratio: 1.85:1

Audio: English: 5.1 Dolby TrueHD Master Audio, English: 5.1 Dolby Digital and German: 2.0 Dolby Digital

Subtitles: English SDH and German

Running Time: 101 minutes

Region: Region A/1

Number of discs: 1

Studio: New Line Home Video

Andrew’s Blu-ray Review – Though it has aged slightly, ‘The Mask’ seems like a film that was many years ahead of its time. First, it was based on an offbeat cult comic book (created by John Arcudi and Doug Mahnke, and published by Mike Richardson’s Dark Horse Comics), a practice which seems to be the norm nowadays (look no further than this spring’s Watchmen for proof). Second, with its then-cutting-edge use of computer graphics augmentation, it gave a sense of cartoon-y whimsy to what would have been an otherwise straightforward action picture (taken to the ninth degree, we’re now given something like 'Speed Racer'). And finally, it saw the potential in a little-known comic named Jim Carrey, who would go on to become a box office juggernaut.

The storyline of ‘The Mask’ concerns one Stanley Ipkiss [Jim Carrey], a loveable loser who works at a bank and lets everyone walk all over him. One night he stumbles upon a mystical, vaguely defined mask that turns him into the titular antihero. Forgoing the comic book’s hyper-violence, the film instead turns Stanley Ipkiss into an even goofier Nutty Professor – an over-caffeinated raconteur able to stretch, squash, and manipulate himself and others in the tradition of famous animator Tex Avery.

From there, things get more complicated, as his outlandish tomfoolery soon attracts the attention of a group of villainous gangsters led by Eric Roberts [stand-in Peter Greene] and the police [Peter Riegert]. The film climaxes with a siege on a charity ball (in keeping with the cartoon feeling, the money for the charity is held in a giant pink piggie), with Peter Greene wearing the mask, amplifying his evil. This is when the movie shifts into all out lunacy, with multiple (human and non-human) wearers of the mask, gun fights, explosives, the whole bit, and it all ends up being a little… blah.

To some ‘The Mask’ isn’t an exceptional film, but to me it is totally hilarious and I love it from when I saw it at the cinema and have loved it ever since. Besides the truly rubbery performance by Jim Carrey (to me, this is his ONLY best film ever), and some of the visual effects are totally brilliant, especially the Tex Avery type cartoons and acts like a B-movie with gangsters and garish visuals thrown in for good measure and I feel that director Chuck Russell does a brilliant job overall.

Jim Carrey, of course introduced us to Cameron Diaz in her first big screen role and shines like a beacon throughout the film and of course it helped catapult Cameron Diaz career big time.

A word of warning, do not under no circumstances purchase the follow up film entitled ‘Son of The Mask’ because I would advise to steer clear of this atrocious re-make. What we basically have here is a license for the filmmakers to do whatever they want to do with the special effects, while the plot, like Wile E. Coyote, keeps running into the wall. Talk about dumb and dumber.

Blu-ray Video Quality – Honestly, I was shocked by this single-layer 1080p 1.85:1 transfer. This must be the best this film has ever looked. The film has been plagued from its original home video inception with muddy visuals; the garish lights of Edge City bleeding into the picture and giving everything an orange-y tint. Sometimes it still goes over the top, with some digital noise, but it wasn’t enough to quell my enthusiasm for the transfer (there’s no noticeable grain or visual blips).

Contrast has been upped to give the entire movie more depth and clarity, really bringing the fictional Las Vegas-meets-Detroit vibe of Edge City to life. And the effects really pop in this transfer, for better or worse, since with their added sheen, they seem a bit more disconnected from the actual movie. While certainly not a reference-quality presentation, you could show The Mask Blu Ray to anyone who saw it in the theatres or on home video and say “Now, look at THIS” and they would be very, very impressed.

Blu-ray Audio Quality – T he 5.1 Dolby TrueHD Master Audio track is really, really great. The cartoony nature of the films means you get really outlandish scenes that are really served well with the impressive sound mix (when Carrey is ping-pongs down the apartment corridor, for instance, all channels are worked vigorously).

The Dialogue-heavy scenes, are supported by a great front-speaker mix, really shine, with very little in the way of ambience or in-between sound. It’s either boom, kapow, klang, or its two people talking in the front speakers. There’s very little in the way of middle ground, audio-wise. Still, I would say this is a solid mix – loud and aggressive when it needs to be, sporting great front-speaker mix. Honestly – the movie has probably never sounded this good, either. The audio package is augmented by a perfectly listenable standard 5.1 Dolby Digital mix in both English and German (with English or German subtitles).

Blu-ray Special Features and Extras:

Audio commentary with Director Chuck Russell: This is the other commentary track option, very dry and very dated (at one point he says “see if you can rewind on your LaserDisc”). Oops, they should have edited this part out, as it is very lazy and sloppy to keep this in, or even better to not allowing to be adding into the supplements? As there will be youngsters today who will think he is talking Martian.

Audio commentary with Director Chuck Russell, New Line Cinema Co-Chairman Bob Shaye, Writer Mike Werb, Executive Producer Mike Richardson, Producer Bob Engelman, Visual Effects Supervisor Scott Squires, Animation Supervisor Tom Bertino and Cinematographer John Leonetti: If you’re going to listen to one of the two commentary tracks provided here, this is the one to go for. Everyone provides super-useful information from their point of view, and with so many participants, you might think things would go a little off the rails, but whoever edited it does so superbly. A little vocal placeholder will pop in, letting you know it’s “writer Mike Werb” or whoever, so in case you forgot what a person sounds like you’ll be covered. This track does seem cobbled together from different interviews, but whoever put it together does a good job to match the content of the commentary with what’s happening on screen. (For example, someone will be talking about the bank heist sequence while the bank heist sequence is on the screen, etc.) You’ll learn a lot of great titbits about the making of the movie (like how visual effects house Industrial Light & Magic assigned its B-team to the movie, which ended up getting praised for its visual effects). Some of the commentary may seem redundant, with similar ground covered in the special features documentaries, but this lively track is still worth a listen.

Return to Edge City [27:16] A nice, fairly comprehensive making of documentary, which covers the whole history of the project (it was originally conceived as a successor to the Nightmare on Elm Street series, as a kind of horror-comedy), with interviews from all the principle cast and crew.

Introducing Cameron Diaz [13:17] Detailing the miraculous hiring of Cameron Diaz in painstaking detail. Really I get it. Cameron Diaz was hired on The Mask as a fortuitous fluke and now she’s a big star. Let’s move on, as it is now old hat news.

Cartoon Logic [13:43] This was my favorite special feature by far, with an investigation into the animated origins of some of The Mask’s best gags. Animation historians are interviewed, and footage from old Tex Avery cartoons is juxtaposed with what occurred in the movie. It’s really great – light but heavy with information. So all in all it is just great and totally brilliant.

What Makes Fido Run [10:51] While this is supposed to be about the dog in The Mask, and how it performed a lot of the astounding stunts in the movie (there’s a great section about how they taught him to “put on the mask” in one of the movie’s most beloved scenes), it soon opens up to be about animal actors in Hollywood and I kind of checked out. I’d say – first five minutes, great, last five minutes, you can skip.

Additional scenes with commentary with Chuck Russell [3:54]) Just a couple of minor scenes – one is an alternate opening sequence, with Vikings traveling to America just to dispose of the haunted mask. This scene is cheap looking and unfinished, and would have added nothing to the movie. The second scene is the death sequence for morally ambiguous reporter Peggy [Amy Yasbeck] and is pretty entertaining. I won’t spoil it here.

Theatrical Trailer [1:00]

Finally, I really liked this film, as I think it shows off splendidly the comedic talent of Jim Carrey at his best, but sadly his other film releases were as far as I am concerned dead ducks and I do not know why people go mad over those very second rate bargain basement films. This film is the perfect production for him to unleash his unique brand of comedy whether it is over the top, or damped down for a specific scene. Graced with a nice set of extras, decent picture and sound quality, and the debut of Cameron Diaz, I highly recommend this film for fans, and non-fans alike of Jim Carrey. This movie is a lot of fun, and director Chuck Russell does a real nice job of crafting a true to life Tex Avery cartoon that lovers of the older short cartoons will truly enjoy and ever since it was originally released in the cinema again I really loved this film and is a really true tour-de-force comedy classic and shows off the actors at their best and that is why I am so proud to own this Blu-ray disc and will give me endless hours of enjoyment. HIGHLY RECOMMENDED!

Andrew C. Miller – Your Ultimate No.1 Film Fan
Le Cinema Paradiso
WARE, United Kingdom
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Surprisingly good on Blu-ray, 12 Jan 2009
This review is from: The Mask [Blu-ray] (Blu-ray)
The Mask as a film is very good - fun, light-hearted, plenty of comedy and a great role for Carrey (if you're a fan). The Blu-ray version is quite sharp for the most part, with plenty of facial detail, vibrant renderings of the very colourful palette of the film, and overall better than DVD versions I've seen. It's not five star picture quality though, hence a 4/5.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars hilarious, 8 Oct 2010
This review is from: The Mask [DVD] [1994] (DVD)
Even before I got this dvd it was my favourite film, it isn't any more although it's really funny and makes me laugh. Jim Carrey is an amazing actor and plays the part really well. It's suitable for all ages and anyone who likes a good laugh!! Great fun to watch, a super film. I couldn't stop watching it, infact the minute I got it at Christmas time I instantly put it on the television!!
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The Mask [Blu-ray]
The Mask [Blu-ray] by Chuck Russell (Blu-ray - 2008)
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