Customer Reviews

52
4.3 out of 5 stars
90125 (Deluxe Version)
Format: MP3 DownloadChange
Price:£3.99
Your rating(Clear)Rate this item


There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later.

on 28 September 2014
I can remember the sense of anticipation before this album came out. After 1981 it looked like Yes were dead and buried, but it was not to be. With Jon Anderson returning to the fold and a new guitarist in Trevor Rabin providing major inspiration, Yes produced an album that was contemporary but still maintained enough progressive influence to not be completely removed from what they had done before. I heard the comment at the time that some people didn't really see this as a Yes album (presumably based only on the change of style of music), although that's a bit hard to explain when there are three original members in the line-up and another one who's been there since 1972 (only four years after their formation). The second objection is that Jon Anderson came in so late that his influence is not really felt on the album. However, the bonus tracks indicate how different the band was sounding in its Cinema guise before Jon came on board. For example just check out the two versions of 'It can happen' as the one with Jon is very Yesified and different from the Cinema version. There is not a weak track on the album, however the standout tracks are 'Owner of a lonely heart' (did Yes ever do anything else so danceable?) 'Hold on' (check out the vocal harmonies, very Yes) 'It can happen', 'Our song' and the magnificent 'Hearts'. Clocking in at over seven minutes this is a track that builds majestically and has much texture and shade in the musical passages and a bit that can only be explained as pure Jon Anderson to finish. While it is true that Trevor Rabin makes a very big impression (not unlike Steve Howe did on the 'Yes album') there is more than enough to suggest that this is a radical and successful reworking and remodelling of the Yes idea brought bang up-to-date!
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
on 26 November 2013
When I was at school, almost every car journey to school for two or three years featured a dose of this album from the car's cassette player. It has such a positive feel to it that comes from clear and vivid production values. Every sound that is on this album seems intended to uplift the listener. It certainly gave me a spring in my step as I marched off to another potentially awful day at school!

The standard of songwriting is so high here that even the weakest songs are good. I would say that the first five tracks are faultless - as good as pop music can get. Songs like 'It Can Happen' and 'Changes' are just amazing and need to be heard by any 60s or 70s throwback who says music got bad in the 80s.

Tracks like 'Leave It', 'Our Song' and 'City Of Love' are less anthemic and stand out a little as less engrossing than the first five tracks. Still, they are good songs with at least one good hook per song.

'Hearts' is where this album really pays dividends. As the last song on the album, one would wish it to have something more dramatic and climactic in its content and these things it certainly has, twice over. Firstly, it has a wonderful chorus that builds in emotion each time it repeats so that, by the last time, it has become like a choir of angels featuring the crystalline alto voice of Jon Anderson backed up by the cool sounding Trevor Rabin and chorally-tinged Chris Squire. And then, after this final chorus, the song melts into a truly sublime guitar solo from Rabin which, to me, is such an unexpected musical move. The melody is so graceful and yet played with such intensity.

I am so glad the Trevor Rabin-era Yes made two more albums after this. Both of these subsequent albums are excellent but I feel this first effort from the reinvigorated Yes team has the most magic.

In spite of all this praise, I have to repeat that the album isn't entirely consistent in the quality of its songs. The albums runs for 45 minutes which I think could be pruned down to 40 by cutting perhaps 'City Of Love'. It seems funny to say this in the times when people have forgotten that many, many single albums today would be double albums if they were transferred to 60s LP vinyl but I really cherish the albums I can digest in one sitting without getting bored for a second and, regrettably, this album doesn't quite qualify for that.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
on 6 April 2010
I remember hearing 'Leave It' on Noel Edmond's Swap Shop. It was only a snippet but it stuck in my head for years. It didn't sound like anything else I'd heard up to then. I was already familiar with Close to Edge and Tormato since my older sister had copies but this was a different Yes altogether. Interestingly I think of Tormato as a direct precursor to 90125.

I'd picked up copies of Fragile, Relayer, Yessongs and Tormato on CD in the last couple of years and finally thought I'd push teh boat out and grab this. I'm really pleased I did. I've always liked Trevor Horn's productions since he makes them really interesting for the listener and on good equipment his stuff usually sounds the bomb (Grace Jones' 'Slave to The Rhythm' being a case in point).

Here Yes, for once, sound totally ahead of the curve. I have to say in retrospect it must have been touch and go as to whether the boys could pull this off and it's testament to Trevor Horn's understanding of where Yes had been and where they were going to be able to create an addition to their catalogue that while totally different still fits and didn't alienate all of their fans (sorry for the excessive sentence structure!) Having said all that it was the band themselves that did all the hard work. Jon Anderson's voice has never sounded better with the music to my mind.

To me it's like a technicolor representation of L.A in the peak 80's. Almost like a videogame soundtrack. Bombastic just doesn't really do it justice. The drum sound combined with the soundstaging (what a nerd) makes it really exciting to listen to. Great rhyme of 'me' and 'even-tual-ly' too ;o)

Get and treat it as a guilty pleasure if you have too!
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
on 20 May 2014
When Yes reunited in the early 80's, after a very brief hiatus, it was almost the same situation as Genesis where much of the progressive elements were cut back in favour of a more pop/rock template. 90125 was Yes' attempt, and to be honest, the results are simply sublime. It is of course an expectedly easy listening and straight forward CD compared to much of they're 70's stuff; it is no less the decency for it. A variety of classic tracks grace this CD and at least some of them should always make a Yes or eighties hits compilation.

"Owner of a lonely heart", "Hold on", "Changes", "Cinema" and "Hearts" are legendary and mandatory anthems. Even, "Leave it" or "Our song", still rank very high on any Yes best-of lists. The songwriting lines, the beautifully memorable choruses, and the sleek and deep sound from vocal-pipe Jon Anderson ensures this one gets the full marks. Sadly this amazing comeback wasn't to be repeated on the next few albums; they were patchy and tended to be characterised by a lack of quality control with a distribution of filler.

90125 therfore, is one of the finest CD's to date by the band, and it still sounds just as good today. I love it:- 5 glorious stars...,
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
on 9 September 2011
Yes had defined much of the Progressive and Mainstream rock music of the 1970s with brilliant albums such as 'Fragile' 'Close To The Edge' and 'Going For The One' but by the early 80s many of the older bands of the early 70s were dying, unable or unwilling to change their style for a new generation that had lived through Punk and come out the other side looking for something different again.

Yes themselves had gone through some serious soul searching and personel changes and I honestly thought, like many others that they were finished. What transpired was an album that became an 1980s masterwork, re-established the band at the very top and put Trevor Horn at the peak of his profession. The 3/4 minute pop song was back on the map, changed and made into something incredibly stylish, commercial yet still retaining the band's commitment to cutting edge music.

If Yes had defined the serious musical scene of the 1970s, 90125 did the same for the early 1980s and set up the band for a series of wonderful albums over the next 15 years. Super.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
on 7 July 2014
'90125' (1983) saw yet another change in line-up with the welcome return of Jon Anderson on vocals and the less expected, but no less welcome, return of keyboard maestro Tony Kaye to the fold. The superb Steve Howe had, sadly, jumped ship and his replacement, South African guitarist/vocalist Trevor Rabin brought a heavier, more AOR feel to proceedings. Despite the change of emphasis towards a more radio-friendly sound, there is still enough here for an ageing cosmic rocker like myself to appreciate. 'Owner of a Lonely Heart' kicks things off in a very catchy way and the likes of 'Changes', 'Cinema', 'City of Love' and the lovely 'Hearts' are all superbly crafted tracks. Although this album is some way short of being a classic, it's certainly worth investing in at a competitively low price.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
on 10 August 2012
yes is prog rocks most successful band and for good reason. By the 1980's they were faced with a different landscape and rose to the occasion with one of the best rock cd's of the period. Yes still retained the prog rock edge but they forgo the lengthy songs of yesteryear to go for a powerful rock cd. It has wonderful singing and solid playing from true master musicians. I love the older yes but this to me was perhaps even more enjoyable in a pure rock cd type of way. There's huge hits on this one. "owner of a lonely heart' and others. Yes pulled off a huge comeback with this one and they really shine here gaining new fans who then could rediscover their great prog rockers from YESterdays gone by.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
on 12 September 2014
True Yes fans will not likely agree with me.
But, for me, this was and is the best album.
Extremely commercial (borne out by becoming their most successful album).
A new line-up with the addition of forward thinkers and risk-taking players.
The re-formed 'Yes' line-up was mostly put together around new guitarist Trevor Rabin and performing material he had already written for himself and latterly 'Cinema' (look 'em up) before it was decided to reform Yes for this project.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
on 10 January 2008
The first thing to say about this is that Trevor Horn finally shows where his talent is - production.
Where 'Drama' was a forgettable wrong turning, much like Tormato (ignoring the couple of really great tracks thereon), 90125 pulled Yes very quickly into the 80s, and shows how they can reinvent their sound without loosing their roots.
There isn't a weak track on the album, and they only thing proven beyond that is that Tony Kaye remained the limited player he always was.
22 commentsWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
on 17 December 2014
I'm a Yes fan who bought this album a while ago. I was a big fan of the Drama album which I thought brought a spark of life to the band. Although this is very good in my opinion, it is not as good as Drama, Going for the One or Close to the Edge, but not far behind. It is quite poppy with some very catchy tracks, complete with excellent harmonies.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
     
 
Customers who viewed this item also viewed


 
     

Send us feedback

How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you?
Let us know here.