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23 of 24 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The famous soundtrack
Soundtrack albums have always been something of a problem - either they stick closely to the movie (as they originally did), presenting a lot of music that makes no sense outside the context of the movie, or (as generally happens now) they gather together a collection of music that has little connection with the movie, except that bits of each song can be heard in the...
Published on 16 April 2005 by Peter Durward Harris

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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Purists Only
This is one of those albums with which everyone became obsessed. Such albums include Michael Jackon's Thriller. Sorry, but that album has some really weak tracks (a Paul McCartney duet!?) and you end up thinking that while many of the tracks are stunning; but not the entire album.

The same is to be said here: They trail off very badly towards the end, almost as...
Published on 31 Mar. 2010 by M. Needham


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23 of 24 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The famous soundtrack, 16 April 2005
By 
Peter Durward Harris "Pete the music fan" (Leicester England) - See all my reviews
(No. 1 Hall OF FAME REVIEWER)    (TOP 50 REVIEWER)   
Soundtrack albums have always been something of a problem - either they stick closely to the movie (as they originally did), presenting a lot of music that makes no sense outside the context of the movie, or (as generally happens now) they gather together a collection of music that has little connection with the movie, except that bits of each song can be heard in the background of the movie. Occasionally, an old style soundtrack (such as West Side Story) had enough great music to sell in huge quantities, but such soundtracks were the exception. The Saturday night fever soundtrack marked the beginning of the shift to a more popular form of soundtrack album, although there are some weak tracks here.
The Bee Gees wrote most of the music for this album and recorded some of it themselves. They gave More than a woman to Tavares although their own version of the song also appears on the album. They gave If I can't have you to Yvonne Elliman although they had already released their own version of the song as the B-side to one of their hits. They also included a couple of their own oldies (Jive talking, You should be dancing) on the soundtrack, but the most important tracks here are the first three tracks - Staying alive, How deep in your love and Night fever - all of which were huge hits around the world although they were bigger hits in America than anywhere else. Of the other tracks, Boogie shoes (KC and the sunshine band), Disco inferno (Trammps) and Open sesame (Kool and the gang) are the best.
Those classic tracks can, of course, be found elsewhere. You would that an appearance on a successful album like this would make stars of the contributors that weren't already stars, but David Shire (for example) disappeared as quickly as he came.
If you only want the best songs, you may prefer to buy them by the individual artists, beginning with a Bee Gees compilation (there are plenty to choose from) but despite some weak tracks, this album is the soundtrack of an era.
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25 of 26 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The 30th Classic Remastered!, 20 Sept. 2007
By 
Martin A Hogan "Marty From SF" (San Francisco, CA. (Hercules)) - See all my reviews
(HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)    (TOP 1000 REVIEWER)    (REAL NAME)   
"SNF" sold over 35 million copies world-wide. It also garnered seven #1 hits in the USA alone. The Bee Gees also won several Grammys from this for production and vocal arrangement. A unique mix of disco, funk and orchestration, this album (now one CD and newly remastered to perfection) defined a generation and a lasting style of music (albeit with repercussions). If you are still stalling on buying this, consider that it has been remixed and if you ever want to listen to dance songs that actually contain interesting lyrics; this is the one.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Disco Peaks, 10 May 2010
One of the biggest selling albums of all time, globally, this captures the Disco era perfectly. Released in 1978 as the soundtrack to the film it contains the obvious Bee Gees hits including Stayin' Alive & Night Fever. Dig deeper though, and you get some really strong club floor fillers, notably K-Jee by the mighty MFSB.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Well this takes me back a few years (or more), 21 Oct. 2009
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I love the sound tracks on this CD - it reminds me of summer days and blue skies and Happy Days (no Fonz pun intended!) Recommend if you are a Saturday Night Era person - excellent acoustic playback and have saved the tracks now to my computer (just in case)!
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20 of 23 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars SOUNDTRACK TO THE LATE SEVENTIES, 8 Oct. 2002
By 
Peter Uys "Toypom" (Sandton) - See all my reviews
(TOP 1000 REVIEWER)    (HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)   
This masterpiece has lost none of its appeal after 25 years, proving the critics wrong and the BeeGees right. Part of its popularity must be due to the clever mix of fast dance numbers and lovely soaring ballads. The frenetic pace of e.g. Staying Alive and Night Fever is balanced by the serene pace of How Deep Is Your Love. For fans of the old-style BeeGees ballads, this new direction with the edgy falsetto vocals and the nervous beat came as a shock initially, but those hits like Jive Talkin' and You Should Be Dancing soon enough swept one up in the disco fever. I love Yvonne Elliman's poignant ballad If I Can't Have You, while the tracks by Kool & The Gang, MFSB and KC & The Sunshine Band are great too. But the real underground classic here is Disco Inferno by Trammps, nine minutes of burbling, bubbling, stomping, storming, gripping funk that is as anthemic as any great rock song by for example Bruce Springsteen. Come to think of it, most of the BeeGees tracks here can also be considered as anthems of the disco generation. Besides serving as bridges between the classic hits, the filler tracks like A Fifth Of Beethoven and Salsation add authenticity to the overall listening experience and serve to strengthen the ambience. This album and the movie took disco out of the underground and reinvented it as a mainstream phenomenon. While rock music was going through the convulsions of the punk and new wave revolutions, disco was having the party of the decade. And this album, along with the music of Donna Summer, Grace Jones, Chic, Giorgio Moroder, Boney M, Village People and others, provided the soundtrack to an era.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars It's a must have, 4 July 2010
By 
M. C. Slade "BathRugby" (Bath, UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
It's definitely a must-have for everybody who was between the ages of 12 and 42 in the mid seventies. I was at the lower end of that spectrum but the songs of this great album pervaded the airwaves everywhere one went in '77 and '78. I remember listening to Yvonne Elliman's If I Can't Have You on the coach radio on a school trip to Brecon, just as I remember hearing Tavares' version of More Than A Woman on a trip to Weymouth Speedway in the school holidays!

My only wish is that these songs were presented in the order that they appear in the film. As an aficionado of the film I think it adds a bit more authenticity to the soundtrack when one can place the songs chronologically in ones mind whilst listening to it, rather than flitting backwards and forwards between scenes.

"I love to watch you dance. I LOVE to watch you dance!" So many lines such as this one evoke great memories for me, of a film that (lest we forget) Siskel and Ebert thought was as good as I did. Now that's some testimony.
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4.0 out of 5 stars "Good Sound track Compilation for Posterity Purposes!", 30 Dec. 2011
By 
Matloub Husayn-Ali-Khan "Matloub" (South Yorkshire, Sheffield, UK) - See all my reviews
I have done over 100 Reviews on Amazon and in my first ever review in June, 2008 I mentioned that the year 1978 was crucial to disco success of "Night Fever & Grease films/musicals". Well, finally, I am in the position to review those two crucial CD's of that "Crucial" era: "Saturday Night Fever" (SNF) 1977-78 and "Grease" 1978.

Starting with the: "SNF" 1977-78. This re-mastered CD compilation by Warner I purchased at HMV recently and despite the fact that SNF is no longer the most best-selling (over 35 million copies) soundtrack of all time (overtaken by the Bodyguard film, 1992 soundtrack - over 45 million copies in 2011!)

Therefore, the opening track by the Bee Gees: "Stayin Alive" is amazing if you hear a remixed version of YouTube video by the Free-Bees entitled: "9/11's a Lie (Stayin Alive)". I can honestly say that this song has been taken to another level, (not in this collection, off course). My top five tracks are "Stayin Alive"; "Night Fever"; "How deep in your love"; "You should be dancing" & "Jive talkin" - these are the best track hits from this sound track album, in my view! The other tracks, like "Boogie shoes" (KC and the sunshine band); "Disco inferno" (Trammps) and "Open sesame" (Kool and the gang) good disco tracks from that category of music.

In fact, I did not really know much about Walter Murphy, Ralph MacDonald & David Shire (Manhattan Skyline) instrumental & I only knew of the song by John Miles! However, apart from this possible criticism of lesser known (weak) tracks by less known popular names featured in the film. Hence, the actual lyrics make up these minus point(s).

Worth buying the soundtrack compilation for posterity purposes!
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Disco Fever, 20 Jun. 2010
By 
Miss Cobham "Klem21" (London) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
I teach Disco Dance and just had to have this album as part of my lesson planning. Saturday Night Fever is the ultimate iconic disco album that should be in everyone's collection whether you remember the 70's or not.
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14 of 17 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Sound of the late 1970s, 24 July 2007
By 
Peter Uys "Toypom" (Sandton) - See all my reviews
(TOP 1000 REVIEWER)    (HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)   
This masterpiece has lost none of its appeal after all these years, proving the critics wrong and the BeeGees right. Part of its popularity must be due to the clever mix of fast dance numbers and lovely soaring ballads. The frenetic pace of e.g. Staying Alive and Night Fever is balanced by the serene pace of How Deep Is Your Love.

For fans of the old-style BeeGees ballads, this new direction with the edgy falsetto vocals and the nervous beat came as a shock initially, but those hits like Jive Talkin' and You Should Be Dancing soon enough swept one up in the disco fever. I love Yvonne Elliman's poignant ballad If I Can't Have You, while the tracks by Kool & The Gang, MFSB and KC & The Sunshine Band are great too.

But the real underground classic here is Disco Inferno by Trammps, nine minutes of burbling, bubbling, stomping, storming, gripping funk that is as anthemic as any great rock song by for example Bruce Springsteen. Come to think of it, most of the BeeGees tracks here can also be considered as anthems of the disco generation.

Besides serving as bridges between the classic hits, the filler tracks like A Fifth Of Beethoven and Salsation add authenticity to the overall listening experience and serve to strengthen the ambience. This album and the movie took disco out of the underground and reinvented it as a mainstream phenomenon.

While rock music was going through the convulsions of the punk and new wave revolutions, disco was having the party of the decade. And this album, along with the music of Donna Summer, Grace Jones, Chic, Giorgio Moroder, Boney M, Village People and others, provided the soundtrack to an era.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars After Beethoven's 5th , a 5th of Beethoven, another classic, 24 Feb. 2007
This is undoubtedly one of the best soundtracks ever released. Ten of the 17 songs here were hits, including seven #1 hits. Of course, only about half the music here was specifically recorded for the movie. Specifically, the first four Bee Gees songs, the Yvonne Elliman song, the Tavares song and the instrumental score by David Shire were especially recorded for the film. The rest of the songs are a year or two older, and some of them had already been hits long before the movie came out. Of course, none of that detracts from the quality of the album. It's really fun to listen to, unless you're one of those people who insist that "disco sucks".

Some real classics such as Night fever, More Than A Woman, A Fifth Of Beethoven...recommended for all ages...any time !
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