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44 of 48 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars In a word - Uplifting
I love this Album! In fact this was the album that got me into Zeppelin, and D'yer Mak'er was the track that sparked my love for this band more than 20 years ago.

Houses of the Holy is a typical Led Zeppelin album, inasmuch as it is a collection of tracks of different styles and moods, delivered by superb musicianship, yet unified by that unique, indescribable...
Published on 16 Oct. 2006 by S. James

versus
3.0 out of 5 stars Hit and Miss
Houses of the Holy starts off brilliantly - The Song Remains The Same / Rain Song/ 1st part of Over the Hills and Far Away flow together in what I would argue is the best bit of sequencing on any of their albums.

Then it goes horribly wrong. The second half of Over The Hills is Led Zep by numbers and The Crunge is - however affectionately intended - a terrible...
Published 4 months ago by P. Hudson


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44 of 48 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars In a word - Uplifting, 16 Oct. 2006
By 
This review is from: Houses of the Holy (Audio CD)
I love this Album! In fact this was the album that got me into Zeppelin, and D'yer Mak'er was the track that sparked my love for this band more than 20 years ago.

Houses of the Holy is a typical Led Zeppelin album, inasmuch as it is a collection of tracks of different styles and moods, delivered by superb musicianship, yet unified by that unique, indescribable Zeppelin sound. As usual, the band invite you on a musical journey that pushes the boundaries of what you thought Led Zep are all about.

Jimmy Page's guitar playing is immaculate through out, from the multi layered guitar rock anthem "The Song Remains the same", through probably their most beautiful ballad "The Rain Song". "Over the Hills and far away" is a folk rock track that would have graced Led Zep III and Dancing Days is an off beat rocker with some great slide guitar playing. The Ocean is probably one of the great guitar riff rock songs ever, in the very best tradition of Black Dog and Heartbreaker whilst No Quarter illustrates the growing creative influence of John Paul Jones.

The tracks that usually divide opinion are "The Crunge" and "D'yer Mak'er". If you take them on face value, The Crunge has a groove that is a brilliant advert for the rhythm section whilst D'yer Mak'er is simply a beautiful, naïve love song.

This album is great for listening to in the summertime; sitting around a beach fire with friends watching the sun set, and has a beautifully uplifting vibe. If you like head banging your way through an entire album then maybe this isn't for you. If you like something a bit more varied then this is a classic.
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28 of 31 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars my current favourite Zep album..., 1 Nov. 2003
This review is from: Houses of the Holy (Audio CD)
This is an album on which all 8 tracks give me tingles, that fabulous feeling that you get when you love a song so much that you almost want to cry and dance and sing all at the same time.
It kicks off with a truly great rock song, 'The Song Remains the Same'. Having recently watched the video of 'TSRTS' for the first time, I'm even more in love with this song than ever. It then runs seamlessly into 'The Rain Song', which is really beautiful, classic acoustic 'gentle' Zep. I love 'Over the Hills and Far Away' for the heartfelt vocals of the chorus. 'The Crunge' I just love. It's bizarre but great (and also sounds like a James Brown song at the end...). My favourite track is probably 'Dancing Days' for its rhythm and riff. 'D'yer Mak'er' (or however you spell it) is a strange contrast of stereotypical romantic song lyrics and a reggae sort of rhythm which is weird but interesting and also gives it individualism. 'No Quarter' is an eerie, Lord of the Rings-ish track; hard to explain but if you listen to it you'll see what I mean! And then there is 'The Ocean', probably the one I neglect unfairly because it seems like a bit of an anticlimax after 'No Quarter', but it's a more typical Led Zeppelin rock track (not that that's a bad thing at all!)
Led Zeppelin are one of my all-time favourite bands. I know everyone loves them for different reasons, but for me their eclectic sound and brilliant musical talent is what makes them so excellent (and they also write damn good songs!). This album is definitely worth getting even if you're not a huge Zep fan because the songs are all so different but so great. So yeah. Buy it!
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars This is why I love Led Zeppelin!, 29 Sept. 2011
By 
os - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: Houses of the Holy (Audio CD)
This just happens to be my favourite Led Zeppelin album. I believe it is their most thoughtful, personal and in many respects most original release. Its still driven by the animal spirits of heavy rock but the band find the wherewithal to include new sounds and influences that add colour and drama to the listening experience. As a result they can move from the heartfelt beauty of 'The Rain Song' to the Do Wop rock n' roll of 'The Ocean' without missing a beat. And of course,'The Song Remains The Same' must be one of Jimmy Page's best guitar rave up tunes: touching on country, blues- rock and English pastoral- his soloing is not only supremely tasty but exhilarating into the bargain. There are a few misfires along the way- such as 'The Crunge' but surely the chaps can be forgiven for having a little fun and trying to escape the hard rock straight jacket that constrained them rather too effectively on albums like 'Presence'.

Plea to Jimmy Page- is there not another opportunity to re-re-master the back- catalogue? - Time has moved on and technology has given producers the tools to improve sound quality. There is so much good music on this album that a sonic wash and brush up would be definitely merited and well received by the fans.

Even so: Highly recommended.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Musical masterpiece, 21 Aug. 2010
By 
A. Belcadenza (Sweden) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Houses of the Holy (Audio CD)
This is Led Zeppelin standing tall at the top of their stairway. As good as it gets. Hard pounding with finesse. High energy and imaginative guitar turnarounds never heard before in rock history. Leeway for contrast and fantasy. This album is the quintessence of their work, showing off their rarely rivalled ability to to emulgate various genres in a tasteful manner. The tracks contain heavy rock riffs, acoustic folk, funk, quasi reggae, modal solos in altered guitar tunings, and then some. At this point in their career, these guys could swing it in flying colors and they were second to none. Their heavy, still feather light aircraft had elevated high above the three chord smoker formula demonstrated on the first album, but they hadn't lost contact with ground control. Their compositions were mature and extra ordinary creative and innovative. Plant could belt out the lyrics stronger than ever and the band grinded like a mean and lean machine. If I had to choose ten albums to bring to a desert island, this would be one of my first picks, hands down. If you are an aspiring rock musician and wanna get surprised by how many chords and ideas you can put into a rock song without trespassing into jazz, this is keeper, mandatory for the ultimate rock record collection.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars should have called it Zep 5 just to annoy the critics..., 15 April 2011
By 
Mr Blackwell (scotland) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: Houses of the Holy (Audio CD)
Well it certainly aint a clone of Zep 4,its a rather interesting disc,makes you listen,makes you think,its not an instant love but its a grower.

Certainly there are a couple of tracks here i dont care for ,namely,'The Crunge' & 'Dancing Days' but have to admit unlike most i rather like 'D'yer Mak'er'.

Highlights are obvious the simply superb opener 'The Song Remains The Same',gloriously upbeat,lifts the mood each time you hear it,while the excellent 'Rain Song' brings you back down,i cant really think of these two tracks apart,drives me nuts when they are separated on best of's/compilations etc

The best track easily 'No Quarter' with the haunting keyboard section while 'The Ocean' while keep the heavy rockers happy(thats me).

reading the other reviews this would appear to be the first disc to really divide opinions,with real enmity towards it,its actually well worth sticking with.
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16 of 18 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A fantastic,yet underated album, 6 July 2000
By A Customer
This review is from: Houses of the Holy (Audio CD)
Houses of the Holy is perhaps not as great in length as Physical Grafiti,or as classic as Led Zeppelin 4,but is one of their more diverse albums. The opening track,The Song Remains The Same is one of the finest opening tracks I have ever heard;powerful and heavy guitars mixed in with percise drums and bass lines. Over The Hills And Far Away has a lovely accoustic intro and a well crafted ending which may suprise,as does The Ocean. As well as containing solid tracks such as The Crunge and Dancing Days,as well as the fun track D'yer Maker,the album is dominated by the quiet,simplistic brilliance of The Rain Song,featuring nice mixed orchestral violins;and the haunting echoes of No Quarter, where John Paul Jones excels on keyboards and synthesisers. Jones is on excellent form throughout the album,along with gutsy guitar work from Jimmy Page. Robert Plant and John Bonham are also top class. This album was an fantastic introduction to their next album Physical Grafiti,which is even better.
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16 of 18 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars We've done four already but now we're steady...., 15 Dec. 2005
By 
Mr. Jeremy Carter "jeremycarter2" (Storrington West Sussex) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Houses of the Holy (Audio CD)
Oh dearie me - a lot of people dont seem to like this one as Led Zep had the temerity to do some different stuff and not rehash Led Zeppelin II over and over. I'll admit it isn't their very best album (a photo finish between Led Zeppelin III and Physical Graffitti) but there is nothing wrong with Dancing Days or The Ocean if you like your typical Zeppelin rockers and No Quarter still raises the proverbial hairs on the back of the neck. Yes The Crunge and D'Yer'Maker are a bit throwaway but does it matter, you'll only be shy a fiver if you buy a used version & you find you haven't liked a single track - I can't see that happening somehow!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars HOUSES OF THE HOLY - for me, will always be 4's little brother., 17 May 2013
By 
Mr Paul Savory (Wrexham, UK) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)   
This review is from: Houses of the Holy (Audio CD)
8 tracks of unbelievable quality. Folk and Rock are superbly blended throughout. What else is there to say...
...try listening to 4 followed by Houses of the Holy (together a great "double" album). And then add in the track "Houses Of The Holy" found on Physical Graffiti.
This is the album where a "disco/funky" sound can be heard. If you haven't heard the Zeppelin "funk" sound then the rest of their catalogue will hold some surprises.

I am reviewing all of Led Zeppelin's studio albums. Here is a list of the albums each with a VERY BRIEF description of the ambience of that album.
GENERALISATIONS: (tasters are not always the best track of a LP but offer the feel of the whole LP (or a larger % of that album) in one song. You may disagree on my song choice.)
1969 - LED ZEPPELIN 1. Blues / rock (taster: Dazed & Confused)
1969 - LED ZEPPELIN 2. Blues / hard rock / folk ballads (taster: What is and should never be)
1970 - LED ZEPPELIN 3. English folk / acoustic / some rock / some blues. (taster: Tangerine)
1971 - (untitled 4th LP). Hard rock / rock / folk (taster: Stairway to Heaven)
1973 - HOUSES OF THE HOLY. Folk rock / funk / pop rock (taster: The Rain Song)
1975 - PHYSICAL GRAFFITI. Funk / rock / blues / country / hard rock (taster: In The Light)
1976 - PRESENCE. Rock / funk rock / blues (taster: Nobody's fault but mine)
1976 - THE SOUNDTRACK FROM THE FILM "THE SONG REMAINS THE SAME" - a live album, a classic live album in fact. Rock / folk rock. (taster: No Quarter)
1979 - IN THROUGH THE OUT DOOR. Ballads / funk / rock (taster (no wonder it was a 7" single): Fool in the rain)
1982 - CODA. A compilation. Blues / folk / funk rock / rock (no taster as the tracks span from 1969 t0 1978)

The use of the word "FUNK" in some of the above is through 1) lack of a better word, and 2) John-Paul Jones acknowledgement of Trampled Under Foot (from Physical Graffiti) being inspired by Stevie Wonder's "Superstition".
It's a shame Atlantic feel it is necessary to issue so many LZ compilations. Zeppelin didn't want singles issued so a listener would probably hear the entire LP. So take a step back in time to the 1970's, buy at least 1 Zeppelin album and listen to it, as it was intended.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Under-rated, REALLY under-rated!!, 15 May 2010
This review is from: Houses of the Holy (Audio CD)
Brought this album to continue my Led Zep education, having started at the beginning and doing the albums in sequence (which seems right in order to understand the journey, musically, that Zeppelin took as a band), not a single album to this point had left me in any doubt that this is one of the greatest rock bands ever to walk the planet.
Anyway, to this album, being a massive Led Zep fan i, of course, had expectations for this album. It didn't disappoint. Granted, there are a couple of odd tracks that don't seem to sit too comfortably on the album (The Crunge and D'yer Mak'er spring to mind for me), but the brilliance of tracks such as The Song Remains the Same and The Rain Song along with No Quarter and The Ocean mean that this is still a stunning album. In some ways tracks such as the The Crunge add to the appeal of the album as a) they are completely different to what you expect and, b) they make the album unique.
I think this album appears to me to be vastly under-rated and, if you love Zep, then you will love this album as wholeheartedly as their other works. If you are new to Zep then you may wish to start with Led Zep IV or Physical Graffiti but this is still not a bad introduction as it certainly encompasses the Led Zeppelin variety you will find on any of their albums and the first track has to be up there with possibly one of the best album intro's of all time.
Well recommended.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Zeppelin, 17 Oct. 2007
By 
This review is from: Houses of the Holy (Audio CD)
One of the best albums by Led Zeppelin, together with Led Zeppelin III, (where you find a very good Jimmy Page playing good songs with the acoustic guitar). Bassist John Paul Jones sounds perfect here, and of course Jimmy Page, John Bonham with his accurate drum touches and slightly slow. Robert Plant, fantastic. Though it has never been considered the best, I love it, you can listen to this disc over and over. I remember my friend and I, we were teenagers then, listening to Houses of the Holy and Physical Graffiti, another great album. When I went to the shop to buy Presence in 1975 or 1976 , I thought and still think it is quite good, too. And a good purchase.
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