Customer Reviews


34 Reviews
5 star:
 (27)
4 star:
 (6)
3 star:    (0)
2 star:    (0)
1 star:
 (1)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


12 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A truly memorable album which I never tire of hearing
That rare breed. An album which actually lives up to and, almost certainly, exceeds the hype that surrounds it. There is so much going on in the record, so many surprises and exciting turns that it's difficult to know where to start. The instrumentation is superb. Not only the way they are played but the choice of instrument. There are some great melodies and wonderfully...
Published on 12 Dec 2000 by Guy Haviland

versus
0 of 11 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Doesn't play in stereo
I bought this item for my father's Christmas present. However, he has just informed me that the record does not play in stereo. My father is a collector of vinyl records and is a great music lover - he has a very impressive set up to play his music on. Therefore, you can imagine how disappointed I was to discover that the 'Love' record I had bought him from Amazon did not...
Published on 14 Jan 2011 by Alex


‹ Previous | 1 2 3 4 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

12 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A truly memorable album which I never tire of hearing, 12 Dec 2000
This review is from: Forever Changes (Audio CD)
That rare breed. An album which actually lives up to and, almost certainly, exceeds the hype that surrounds it. There is so much going on in the record, so many surprises and exciting turns that it's difficult to know where to start. The instrumentation is superb. Not only the way they are played but the choice of instrument. There are some great melodies and wonderfully atmospheric chord sequences. My favourite track is the impossible-to-remember-it's name "Maybe The People Would Be The Times Or Between Clark and Hilldale," though "Alone Again Or" "Old Man" and "You Set The Scene" are not far behind. I love the guitar playing throughout but Ken Forssi's bass and Michael Stuart's percussion contribute massively also. Then there's the use of brass, which completes the wonderful musical fabric. Whenever I've played this album to people, they ask what it is and are invariably instant converts. Just excellent!!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Bona Fida Masterpiece, 12 Nov 2009
This review is from: Forever Changes (Audio CD)
Truly brilliant album that lives fully up to the hype around it, it starts of with the splendiforous slice of mariachi horned glory that is Alone Again Or and goes from strength to strength: following up with the almost-as-good This House is Not a Motel, which articulates perfectly Arthur Lee's (God Rest his Soul) sense of unease with flower power and the summer of love and proves remarkably prescient given the events at Altamont just a few years later and the paranoid nightmare that became of the 60's lovefest. Another highlight in the album is the ridiculously titled, "And Maybe the People Would be the Times or Between Clark and Hilldale," which, inspite of the frankly awful name, is a brilliantly melodic song with a brilliant vocal and an unnervingly happy tone. Bummer in the Summer is the other more famous song, but really naming highlights is futile because the whole album is a highlight, richly orchestrated and beautifully performed, all of which belies the dark themes present in what is, with the benefit of hindsight, a direly prescient warning of the dangers of the whole, hippie movement. Aside from all that, though, it's just really, really good.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


21 of 23 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Quite Simply: The best album ever made!, 1 Dec 1999
By A Customer
This review is from: Forever Changes (Audio CD)
It's always refreshing to find that the favourite album from your teens has withstood the test of time. Love, along with the Doors, were at the forefront of the West coast sound of the late sixties but didn't find the latters commercial success. Don't expect an album of hippie ideology. Find instead lush melodies, blistering rock guitar, beautiful memorable songs, strong lyrics and an album that sounds as fresh and relevant as it did in 1969. Still guaranteed to raise the hairs on the neck. Today you can hear echoes of this album in such work as that by the Manic Street Preachers and others. A beautiful, timeless classic.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Like Nothing Else!, 31 May 2011
By 
Rob C. (Glasgow, Scotland) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Forever Changes (Audio CD)
I've had this wonderful record in my life for nearly thirty years and i still regard it as the best album i've ever heard. It's such a timeless recording and still has a mesmerising effect on me even after thousands of listens. There's no point, i dont think, in mentioning any particular tracks, the album must be taken as a whole to fully have that rollercoaster ride of emotions. It's almost impossible to categorize the sound on this album and all i can say is i would recommend Forever Changes to anyone who loves real music. God bless Arthur Lee!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


17 of 19 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars the best LOVE album in the world... ever!, 25 May 2008
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Previously issued as a remastered (1CD) in 2001, FOREVER CHANGES came with bonus tracks: "Your Mind And We Belong Together"/"Laughing Stock" single, plus a few nice outtakes & a demo.

But we always knew there was more stuff out there (no pun intended), thanks to THE LAST WALL OF THE CASTLE (CD), also released in 2001, which boasted alternate mixes of "A House Is Not A Motel" and "The Red Telephone" (edited).

Well now it appears we've got the lot in the form of this superb 2CD Collectors Edition, long overdue for a work of this stature.

CD 1 contains the original album mix in all its glory. Again remastered, a marginal upgrade on 2001, it benefits by standing alone, providing a more authentic listening experience for those of us who appreciate silence following the final track.

Of greater interest however is CD 2, which is choc-a-bloc full of different mixes, outtakes, demos, etc, and opens with a complete alternate mix of the album. Since 1968, I have been listening regularly to FOREVER CHANGES and can confirm that there are a multitude of differences in these alternate mixes, many counted in by Lee. Most noticeably different are the manic guitar parts on "A House Is Not A Motel" and "Live And Let Live". There are also several vocal and production variations on tracks like "You Set The Scene" (previously released) and "The Red Telephone".

Incidentally, the aforementioned track is often misquoted as containing the line: "We're all normal AND we want our freedom". In fact Lee says: "We're all normal WHEN we want our freedom". Whether Lee himself is deliberately misquoting from Peter Brook's "Marat/Sade" play or not doesn't really matter, but read this way it adds an even creepier slant to the sinister atmosphere surrounding this wonderful piece. The quote can be heard even more clearly on the alternate mix.

However, it remains a mystery as to when the alternate mix of the album was done. Could be an early working version, possibly? My instincts say not - it would be nice if someone reading this could clear the matter up in a future review.

A further ten bonus tracks follow, five of which appeared on the 2001 release, including "Your Mind And We Belong Together" & "Laughing Stock".

New to this edition are backing tracks for "A House Is Not A Motel" (minus guitar solo), "Andmoreagain" (electric), tracking sessions highlights for "The Red Telephone", plus two outtakes, "Wonder People" (original mix) and "Wooly Bully". All, apart from "Wooly Bully" (a bona-fide barrel scraper!), are more than worthy of inclusion.

New liner notes by Andrew Sandoval are both informative and well written, containing previously unpublished interview material with Michael Stuart and John Echols, who shed further light on the making of the album and the myth of its oft rumoured follow up, "Gethsemane" .

All we need now to complete the cycle is the original mono mix - start saving up for the 3CD box, due for release in 2015 (possibly), ho-ho-ho...
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Possibly the greatest record ever, 19 Jan 2001
By A Customer
This review is from: Forever Changes (Audio CD)
Although it was made 3 years before I was born, this is a record so rich I feel like I am living it. you don't listen to this record you become part of it, the purest trip ever. This is truly a landmark album, encapsualting the summer of love in its grooves but sowing the seeds of the darkness to follow, like a sweet sounding Siren you know is dangerous but just can't resist.
"Alone Again Or", on the surface pure pop whimsy, but underscored with a dark beauty that flavours the entire album. Frequemtly soaring, as on "And More Again", but always underpinned by the nagging portent of imminent doom, perhaps Lee sensing his own future problems or those of the world in general. Throughout the lyrics are distant, teasing but always seem to make perfect sense no matter how vague, providing surprisingly firm footholds in the ethereal soundscape created.....
Musically exemplary, horns, strings, each contributing to the overall trip, culminating in the masterful "You Set The Scene"
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars One of the best records ever, 9 May 2011
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Forever Changes (MP3 Download)
This is one of the best albums I have ever heard. I first heard it back in the 70s when I was 17 when I went out and bought the LP on the strength of what I had read about it. It was not easy to find in the UK back then and I was certainly not disappointed. I saw Arthur Lee do the whole thing live in London just before he died, which was brilliant and made up for me not going to see him for some reason in 1974 when he played at a venue a bus ride away from where I lived at the time.

I have started listening to Forever Changes again recently and it sounds better than ever. Every song is brilliant, the arrangements are beautiful and I appreciate the menace in lyrics more now than when I was a teenager. I have tried to convert my own teenagers to it but no joy so far.

I have only heard two other Love albums in full - Da Capo and Four Sale. They are both good, but to me the ten tracks on Forever Changes are all better than anything else I have heard by them, although 7 and 7 Is, the Castle and Orange Skies in particular from Da Capo come close.I have never really found out why Arthur broke up the band after Forever Changes apart from vague stories about drugs and heavy scenes. I guess they were never going to be able to top Forever Changes.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Seminal work, 1 May 2011
By 
N. Watson - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Forever Changes is quite simply the best album ever made. I have played this since i was 17 years old and never grown tired of it. Now i'm 50 it is still as important to me now as it was then. Do yourself a favour and buy it. This is a 'slow burn' album but once it gets hold of you, it will change you outlook on music.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A time capsule, 5 Feb 2011
By 
D. Chisholm "Mr Chis" (The Outback; UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Everything has been said about this classic CD.

You really are transported back to an era in west coast America where this music emereged and developed. It's an excellent listen, although you really have to be 'into it' to gain full enjoyment after the familiar single 'Alone Again ... Or'.

Remixed albums are often insensitively handled, but the bonus CD is an enjoyable listen, staying true to the original and concentrating on getting greater clarity from the instruments. Modern reverbs and EQ make it a worthwhile addition to your collection.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Lee Sets the Scene, 25 Feb 2010
This review is from: Forever Changes (Audio CD)
Unfortunate references to 'Nam and acid can date a 1960s psychedelic rock album monsterously, but there are no such exhibitions of a cartoonish 1967 in 'Forever Changes', Arthur Lee's masterpiece. It would be absurd and lazy, however, to deem this a psychedelic record simply due to its West Coast origins. With the band channelling the mariachi proto-folk punk of their eponymous debut and their second effort, 'Da Capo', Lee becomes the anomaly of the Summer of Love, preferring existential crisis and sweepingly beautiful arrangements instead of succumbing to the more cliqued elements of the era, thus creating something that was ultimately original and enduring in its cause of documenting the darker side of the 1960s and the individual within it.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 2 3 4 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

Only search this product's reviews