Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop All Amazon Fashion Cloud Drive Photos Shop now Learn More Shop now DIYED Shop now Shop Fire Shop Kindle Oasis Listen with Prime Shop now Shop now

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars141
4.3 out of 5 stars
Format: DVD|Change
Price:£3.68+ Free shipping with Amazon Prime
Your rating(Clear)Rate this item


There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later.

on 14 February 2009
I'm making my way through all the recent Bond on Blu-Ray releases, and strangely enough as I move through the franchise from the oldest (Dr.No), the image quality seems to be very slowly deteriorating. That's not to say that the image is poor; it is in fact excellent, but Dr.No's was astonishing and is over a decade older. The colours appear a Little muted compared to the earlier films, and the picture is more grainy, particularly in the garish red walls of Mr. Big's Fillet of Soul hideout. However, there is plenty of detail in the close-ups of the actors faces, and the materials of the clothing are rendered so well you could almost feel them. In general it is still a great improvement over the Ultimate Edition DVD (and that was pretty good for a start off).

The sound however seems to be improving as I move through the series (apart from a little dip for From Russia With Love), and for the first time Live and Let Die has a properly working surround treatment to my ears. There is real activity in the LF channel, with explosions now having real impact, and there is some decent use of the rear speakers as well, with only a few occasions sounding a little contrived (the birdsong in the Bayou scene for example). Effects steering is also very believable. The score is delivered beautifully, with plenty of audible detail particularly in the percussion, it also swells nicely into the rears to envelope you as you watch. I did notice however that in a couple of scenes the music drops into mono (the boat race just before the disruption of the wedding for example), this is pretty noticeable and sounds a little strange.

I didn't experience the worryingly long loading times I had with the earlier Bond films, which is an improvement. The extras appear to be identical to the Ultimate Editions, although the major docs have been bumped to HD which is nice.
0Comment|28 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 30 January 2002
I may be biased because this was the first Bond film I saw, and the film that introduced me to the full cinema experience, but I rate this as the best Bond movie. With a new lead, all concerned seem to be trying that little bit harder, the style of the film is pitched just right - not too much humour to outweigh the sense of menace, and the speedboat chase must rate as one of the top action sequences of the series - wild, yet still not quite implausible, which is one of the problems with the more recent films - constantly out to outdo themselves until the stunts are so ridiculous that all credibility is lost. Also the bad guys with their sinister voodoo scarecrows add a chilling touch that few of these films have. all this and the priceless Sheriff JW Pepper... stop reading this rubbish and just buy it!
33 comments|28 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 31 July 2006
Roger Moore's tenure as James Bond lasted from 1973 to 1985, during which time the Bond series turned more towards a comic style and Bond became more known for one-liners than for being a spy and assassin. Some of Moore's films were, on the other hand, much more balanced with regars to humour. Live And Let Die is my favourite Roger Moore James Bond film. Although much of Ian Fleming's novel is abandoned, the film still carries a Fleming-esque flavour. This is in part due to the Caribbean setting. Filmed in Fleming's beloved Jamaica, LALD is Moore's first effort as Bond and he is most convincing as Ian Fleming's secret agent. He is a little more ruthless here, and although he has some tongue in cheek dialogue, it doesn't go overboard. The only time the comic side of the picture gets out of hand is when Clifton James is on screen hamming it up as Sheriff J.W Pepper. Also the death of the villain, Kananga is very far fetched, and doesn't look convincing on screen.

The film's strongest points are probably the score and the henchmen. The score was composed by Beatles producer George Martin and really gives the film an interesting. The title song is used as the main action theme and Martin also composed some other good themes which appear regularly in the score. As much as I am a fan of John Barry, I'm not convinced that he could have done a better job than Martin on this film. In fact, I can barely imagine the picture with a more traditional Barry score.

The villain's henchmen are excellent. Tee Hee, a tall sadist armed with a mechanical hook. Baron Samedi, a voodoo priest with a wonderful sadistic laugh. Whisper, an overweight, almost mute henchman. The villain himself is Dr. Kananga, a politician who also operates as a Harlem gangster. The plot revolves around heroin, and Kananga's efforts to gain the monopoly in the heroin trade.

The DVD itself is very good. I didn't own the Special Edition, but I really like this Ultimate Edition. Although, looking at which features were present on the previous release. I'm not sure whether it would be worth buying this if you already have the previous version. But if, like me, you only had the VHS previously, this is a must buy. The library of extra features is rather good. The usual 'Making Of' documentary, narrated as always by Patrick Macnee. Also, worth looking at is the 'Bond 1973' documentary. Another behind the scenes look at LALD, but not as good as the Patrick Macnee one. Also of interest is the Bond circa 1964 piece, showing Roger Moore appearing as 007 in a 1964 TV program. It is a very nice comic piece between Bond and his Russian female counterpart, both just trying to have a holiday, but enable to shake off their suspicions about each other.

Overall, this is one of my favourite Bond films and an equally good DVD release. One thing that puzzles me though, why did they put a picture of Roger Moore in Octopussy on the label of Disc 1. He barely looks like the same person that he did in LALD, as the pic was taken a decade later. Oh well, a minor slip, but it cerainly doesn't ruin this very good DVD set. Go on, buy it. You won't regret it.
0Comment|13 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 15 January 2004
In his first entrance as James Bond, Moore delves into the more humourous aspect of 007. He still manages to retain the suave and sex appeal which made Connery famous but brings something new to the role. The title song by Paul McCartney is excellently written and is played throughout the film. The DVD has some fabulous extras including the famous TV advert featuring Moore instructing us to 'drink a pinta milk a day' as one of the TV spots as well as the usual collectors booklet with in depth information about the film itself. Overall a good buy!
0Comment|4 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 31 January 2014
After the disappointment of watching a greying, slightly podgy Sean Connery going through the motions in 1971's 'Diamonds Are Forever', it was clear that the Bond producers needed an established actor to step into the role for the long term. Step forward Roger Moore.
Moore was already an internationally well known face on TV thanks to his portrayal of 'The Saint', as well as his other appearances in things like 'The Persuaders' and 'Ivanhoe'. He had also appeared in a number of movies, the most notable of which 'The Man Who Haunted Himself' is something of a cult classic. Moore had been earmarked for the role of James Bond on numerous occasions already, but by 1973, he was ready to take 007 into a new era.
'Live and Let Die' is a breath of fresh air. Moore's Bond is nothing like Connery's dangerous, 'alpha-male' interpretation, and that's the beauty here. Moore glides through the film effortlessly with style and never once tries to replicate any 'Conneryisms'. He plays it his own way with a raised eyebrow, the odd cigar and a perfectly delivered quip. That's not to say he's lightweight; Moore holds his own in the action scenes and looks good with a gun, brandishing it with the air of a secret agent who knows what he's doing.
In terms of the story, 'Live and Let Die' borrows a little bit from Ian Fleming's book but mainly taps into the 'blaxploitation' culture of the time, using a number of black actors in the villainous roles. Yaphet Kotto makes for a menacing heavy as Mr. Big/Dr. Kananga and plays it totally straight, which is quite refreshing. The plot itself is centred around the worldwide monopoly of heroin distribution, so it's a bit of a far cry from the megalomaniac, holding the world to ransom with a massive base inside a volcano. This story is realistic with Bond relying more on his wits than gadgets and when he gets cut, he bleeds.
The direction is ok without being outstanding. I've never found Guy Hamilton's direction style to be particularly exciting, but the film moves along a good pace and has some memorable sequences such as Bond's encounter with alligators and the boat chase through the Louisiana bayous.
My only complaints (in addition to Hamilton's fairly flat direction) are Jane Seymour's uninspiring Bond Girl, 'Solitaire', George Martin's ho-hum soundtrack (where was John Barry?) and the criminal non-appearance of Q.
Other than that, 'Live and Let Die' is a solid entry in the series with an unflappable lead, good villains, some decent action sequences and a scorching theme song.
A good start to the Moore era.
In terms of the Blu-Ray, the picture and sound are a slight improvement on the DVD, although not as overwhelming as the transfers of the first four films, which are outstanding. Whether it's worth an upgrade is debatable. Extras are the same as the 'Ultimate Edition' DVDs, with an excellent 'making of' documentary and a good commentary from Moore himself.
0Comment|2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
VINE VOICEon 2 December 2010
And none the worse for it, since every Bond film needs a fresh spin on the same old formula. Roger Moore's first outing as JB is, in equal measures, comical and action-packed. You'll never get bored. But it's definitely the weirdest Bond ever with loads of utterly bizarre moments.

It begins with M turning up at JB's house in the early hours while he's pumping some Italian agent for information (don't you just love his initialed dressing gown). Before sending him to America to investigate a Harlem pimp known as Mister Big he delivers some gadgets from Q-Branch, including a very useful watch. Q himself, or Major Boothroyd if you want to call him by his proper name, doesn't make any appearance in this one.

Standing out like a Muslim in an airport, almost every single black person JB encounters in Harlem is on Mister Big's payroll. And they've got a seemingly endless bag of tricks to play on him. The funny thing about Moore is that he's very proper and British and doesn't think anything of walking into a tough Harlem bar while dressed up like the Duke of Edinburgh. His stunned reactions when they mess with his head are seriously funny.

The action then moves to Louisiana and a savage Caribbean island as JB uncovers a massive heroin plot. There's a particularly long speedboat chase across a bayou where JB encounters Sheriff J.W. Pepper, the most stereotypical southern redneck ever. Think of Texas Businessman from The Simpsons and you get the idea. JB also gets to dodge a hundred hungry Gators and do, many times over, Solitaire, Mister Big's Tarot card reader.

I'm not sure what kind of formidable villain uses a Tarot card reader to help him do business but when you also surround yourself with a hook-handed maniac called Tee-Hee, a quiet fat guy called Whisper and a seemingly unkillable voodoo high priest called Baron Samedi then you really do become a serious baddie. Right? He even goes on a big speech about how his master plan works before attempting to kill JB slowly. Obviously this makes much more sense than just shooting him right away. When will they learn?

Despite being the oldest actor to debut as Bond (at 46), Moore does look younger than Connery. And while Sean was gruff and Scottish, Moore is perpetually calm and refined, even in the face of danger (fingers being chopped-off, snake in the bath, being eaten by gators/sharks). Everything that the British once thought they were. He has a certain sarcastic edge that the other Bond actors lacked. While some of his films may have been the sillier of the franchise, Moore has always been my favorite (though Dalton was the best). And the massive revolver and holster he uses at the end is so much more masculine than the usual, wimpy as hell, Walther PPK.

And, as much as I am no fan of Paul McCartney, you gotta love that theme song! Exciting and iconic at the same time. And also yet another juxtaposition in the weirdest Bond movie ever.

MI6, Harlem, Pimps, Paul McCartney, Gators, Heroin, Voodoo, Snakes, Sharks, Clairvoyance, Rednecks, Afros, Fake Afros, Fillet of Soul, Human Sacrifice, Scarecrows and a small-headed man in a Top-Hat who lost a fight with chickens. Is this a Bond film or did the whole world just go insane?

The Blu Ray looks and sounds terrific, and has loads of extras.
0Comment|2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
Sean Connery finally said goodbye to Bond, the character that had made him famous, with `diamonds are forever'. So for Bond's eighth big screen outing we were introduced to Roger Moore (and his eyebrow) in the lead, the third actor to play the part on the silver screen.

Known for his roles in Ivanhoe and The Saint, Moore was a good choice. He had the on screen presence and mannerisms to carry it off, but was no Connery clone His Bond was just different enough to Connery to stand out, and it is this attempt to be different that was the secret of his success in the role. Moore's Bond seemed a more human construct, slightly less remote and dangerous but still ruthless when it comes to getting the job done.

In this film Bond is sent to America in order to sort out some drug smugglers. Along the way we have fun as we see the typical Englishman deal with the mean streets of Harlem, there is the excellently staged and thrilling bug boat chase through the Florida everglades, and the immortal stunt with the crocodiles. Into the mix there is a large dose of voodoo, and it sometimes seems that Bond's antagonists are not of this world. After the almost embarrassing attempt to be hip with the last film, the producers got it largely right this time, and largely because of the change of actor the humour and seventies fashions work a lot better.

There are notable performances: Yaphett Koto as the villain - a very underrated actor Koto gave this role his all and made a memorable Mr. Big, and Jane Seymour as Solitaire, the voodoo priestess who finds the tarot cards stacked against her... There is also an excellent score featuring Wings, it is up there with any of Shirley Bassey's themes for the series and fits the mood and style of the film to a tee.

It is a film which is full of atmosphere, entertaining in terms of thrills and humour and a great way to pass a couple of hours.

Notable in the Bond canon that it is the second film not to feature Q, and Bond carries a Magnum rather than the usual Walther PPK.

This ultimate edition really is the best version of the film I have owned. The picture has been lovingly restored and cleaned up, and looks amazing. Really, I am not just saying that. It looks superb. The sound has been similarly treated and there is an option to listen to it in 5.1 DTS surround, which is truly exceptional.

As well as the superb presentation of the film, there is also a host of extras, original trailers, informative audio commentaries and the such. These are exhaustive and some of them quite interesting. But these really a garnish for the main course, which is the film itself. This is an excellent release, and does the film justice. This series of `Ultimate editions' really sets the standard for film releases. It really does not get any better.
0Comment|2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 22 May 2011
Blu-Ray all zone

Ratio of the feature film:
1.78:1

Languages of the feature film:
DTS Master Audio 5.1: English
DTS 5.1: French, German
Dolby 5.1: Latin Spanish, Brazilian Portuguese
Dolby 2.0: 3 commentaries including Sir Roger Moore himself!

Subtitles for all the videos:
Spanish, Portuguese, Danish, Dutch, Finnish, French, German, Norwegian, Swedish, English for the hearing impaired

Verdict:
An outstanding picture and sound quality, the Lowry Company in charge of this restoration did an excellent job, compare to the first DVD edition or the VHS where the picture was colorless or dull, this new transfer is absolutely remarkable with a fantastic picture. It is a real pleasure to watch such a film in such fantastic conditions.
If you watch carefully, you should notice the spoons stuck to the watch thanks to a hook and at the end, the "shark" bullet supposedly attracted by the magnet-watch but in fact being pulled out by a fishing line.
0Comment|2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
Sean Connery finally said goodbye to Bond, the character that had made him famous, with `diamonds are forever'. So for Bond's seventh big screen outing we were introduced to Roger Moore (and his eyebrow) in the lead, the third actor to play the part on the silver screen.

Known for his roles in Ivanhoe and The Saint, Moore was a good choice. He had the on screen presence and mannerisms to carry it off, but was no Connery clone His Bond was just different enough to Connery to stand out, and it is this attempt to be different that was the secret of his success in the role. Moore's Bond seemed a more human construct, slightly less remote and dangerous but still ruthless when it comes to getting the job done.

In this film Bond is sent to America in order to sort out some drug smugglers. Along the way we have fun as we see the typical Englishman deal with the mean streets of Harlem, there is the excellently staged and thrilling bug boat chase through the Florida everglades, and the immortal stunt with the crocodiles. Into the mix there is a large dose of voodoo, and it sometimes seems that Bond's antagonists are not of this world. After the almost embarrassing attempt to be hip with the last film, the producers got it largely right this time, and largely because of the change of actor the humour and seventies fashions work a lot better.

There are notable performances: Yaphett Koto as the villain - a very underrated actor Koto gave this role his all and made a memorable Mr. Big, and Jane Seymour as Solitaire, the voodoo priestess who finds the tarot cards stacked against her... There is also an excellent score featuring Wings, it is up there with any of Shirley Bassey's themes for the series and fits the mood and style of the film to a tee.

It is a film which is full of atmosphere, entertaining in terms of thrills and humour and a great way to pass a couple of hours.

Notable in the Bond canon that it is the second film not to feature Q, and Bond carries a Magnum rather than the usual Walther PPK.

This digitally restored edition really is the best version of the film I have owned. The picture has been lovingly restored and cleaned up, and looks amazing. Really, I am not just saying that. It looks superb. The sound has been similarly treated and there is an option to listen to it in 5.1 DTS surround, which is truly exceptional.
0Comment|One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
Fondly remembered by many who saw it first time round as Moore's best effort, you have to be in the right mood to see this today and willing to make a mental trip back in time to the early 70s when it was made. It's probably dated more than almost any other Bond film - even bearing in mind that the seventies was the decade that fashion forgot, the sideburns and flares on display here are pretty vicious and, as the first film since Dr No to enter Bond's flat, it is deeply distressing to note that he is a slave to Formica and has chicken-shaped pate moulds on the wall. As swell as being the first Bond film since Goldfinger not to be shot in 2.35:1 widescreen, more significantly it also marks the point at which the series started imitating other trends rather than setting them - in this case blaxploitation pictures, which is quite an achievement you're your hero is white. Beyond its voodoo trappings little of the plot of Ian Fleming's novel survives as Shaft - sorry, Bond - takes on the drug-pushing president of a small island in Jamaica, but it's certainly one of the most action-packed of the series and never outstays its welcome the way some later efforts would.

Taking barely 11 minutes to get into some serious raised eyebrow action, there is perhaps a bit too much of Simon Templar in Moore's performance, but there is also a harder edge to his Bond that was soon smoothed away. He has a very cynical attitude towards Jane Seymour's virginal Solitaire), using her callously as bait. In a way it's a blessing that the film was not tailored specifically for Moore as later efforts would be, relying more on his rarely tapped abilities as an actor than his star persona. It doesn't hurt that director Guy Hamilton visibly raises his game from his lazy helming of Diamonds Are Forever.

This also shows the first sign of breaking up set pieces to add throwaway visual gags. This frequently detracts from the nifty and still very impressive speedboat chase, possibly the best sustained action sequence in the series until the free-running chase in Casino Royale, as Clifton James does his Deputy Dawg impersonation while the odd bit of slapstick comedy removes much of the threat. At times it is hard to tell which lines are meant to be funny and which ones aren't. "Great disguise, Bond - white face in Harlem" is pretty obviously the former, but surely the unintentional dialogue high point has to be Tony Award-winning Shakespearian actor Yaphet Kotto - curiously seeming to give three performances, starting out as Marlon Brando before easing into the genial villainy - uttering the immortal "Names is for tombstones, baby. Take him out and waste him."

The extras from the original single-disc DVD release are all retained for this repackaged Ultimate Edition 2-disc set - including the documentary with amazing outtakes of the alligator stunt going wrong that prove that the filmmakers used real gators - as well as some welcome new additions. The 1964 extract from Millicent Martin's TV show with a young Moore sending up James Bond is fun, and there's an intriguing 1973 documentary shot on the set. The print may be a damaged mixture of faded color and black and white footage, but the content more than compensates, from Moore quipping "If Guy Hamilton thinks I'm doing that again, he can get the other feller back, I'm telling you" to the depressing sign of the times that even then the film industry was still partially segregated, with the Black Stuntmen's Association having to prove that you didn't need blacked-up white stuntmen to double for black actors. The trailers are among the best of the series, promising 'More excitement, more action, more danger and more - much more - Roger Moore.' Better still, the legendary Milk Marketing Board commercial that was so cruelly undermined by Moore's entertaining account of filming, Roger Moore as James Bond 007 (A Pan original), is also included, featuring much manufactured footage of the cast downing pints of milk after dangerous stunts!

Highly recommended.
0Comment|One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse

Send us feedback

How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you?
Let us know here.

Sponsored Links

  (What is this?)