Customer Reviews


9 Reviews
5 star:
 (2)
4 star:
 (1)
3 star:
 (4)
2 star:
 (1)
1 star:
 (1)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


18 of 21 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Well worth a look.
I got the Super 8mm print of this film in the 1980's, and in 2001 I got the Image DVD. This is a very good example of a really good 50's/60's Sci Fi film. The effects are very good for the period and the acting is OK. This print kicks off with the original AIP logo and seems to be uncut. Legend films has even added Color to the movie for the first time, making it really...
Published on 22 Feb 2009 by K. W. Wardle

versus
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars A Very "B" Movie Phantom Planet
To clarify a situation created by other reviews, The Phantom Planet is available from several different sources, with some releases offering various extras. As far as I'm aware the only British release comes from Elstree Hill and this DVD has neither Special Features nor has been colourized.

The film itself is strictly low budget with many of its special...
Published on 10 May 2011 by Tony Byworth


Most Helpful First | Newest First

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars A Very "B" Movie Phantom Planet, 10 May 2011
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: The Phantom Planet [DVD] (DVD)
To clarify a situation created by other reviews, The Phantom Planet is available from several different sources, with some releases offering various extras. As far as I'm aware the only British release comes from Elstree Hill and this DVD has neither Special Features nor has been colourized.

The film itself is strictly low budget with many of its special effects being similarly uninspiring, especially the space craft in flight, accompanied by a script that plods along in spite of an imaginative storyline of an astronaut marooned on an asteroid, being shrunk to six inches tall and fighting off inter-planetary invaders. The virtually unknown Dean Fredericks has the lead role in a short-lived movie career while arguably the best known actors are Coleen Gray, whose start with the major studios soon moved on to "B" movieland, and Francis X. Bushman, coming to the end of a 200 movie career that began back in silent days. In spite of its semi-cult status, viewers wanting their first taste of sci-fi will be much better rewarded with the likes of Forbidden Planet and This Island Earth from the same era.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


18 of 21 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Well worth a look., 22 Feb 2009
By 
K. W. Wardle - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Phantom Planet [DVD] [2008] [Region 1] [US Import] [NTSC] (DVD)
I got the Super 8mm print of this film in the 1980's, and in 2001 I got the Image DVD. This is a very good example of a really good 50's/60's Sci Fi film. The effects are very good for the period and the acting is OK. This print kicks off with the original AIP logo and seems to be uncut. Legend films has even added Color to the movie for the first time, making it really special. The original B/W print is also on the disc. Sadly there are no extras, aside from some Legend films trailers. Legend is a studio that Colours old B/W films for a new generation of fans. Their efforts are very good indeed and this film is a good example. Give it a go and see for yourself! My only gripe about Legend films is their cover art. I wish they would pay more attention to their DVD covers. At the moment they have six new colorized PD titles, and I really hope that they do some more soon..well worth a look indeed!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


15 of 18 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Phantom Planet worth discovering, 29 Nov 2009
The Phantom Planet was one of the many victims of TV's Mystery Science Theatre 3000 back in 1997 where its failings provided a rich source of comment. When watched away from such mockery, it doesn't prove the tedious slog that other MST3K choices have sometimes proved in their original, un-tampered versions. A sucker for 1950s and 1960s space movies - Destination Moon, Conquest Of Space and the rest - I have a weakness for those films informed more or less by the hard science of the times. In which men risk space travel in curiously stripped-down boiler-tank interiors, served by a few lights on a console and clunky readouts, belt-up in space recliners, and when they land, high concept meets low culture.

Having said that, most of the 'science' in The Phantom Planet occurs at the beginning, and again at the end, and what falls between, despite some speculations about the revolutionary properties of gravity, is more than a little daft. Director William Marshall, whose only other credits were two late Errol Flynn movies, returned a decade later for this last effort, based on a script by the producer. Essentially a love triangle set on a Lilliputian planet (revealing this won't spoil any of the wooden drama it attempts) The Phantom Planet's early scenes are reasonably proficient and suffer most with the benefit of technological hindsight. But once hero Captain Frank Chaplin (western regular Dean Fredericks) lands on asteroid Rheton, any scientific integrity deflates as quickly as the spacesuit he wears, the astronaut shrinking down to local size courtesy of the planet's uniquely affecting atmosphere.

If the script had called for Chaplin to remain an intergalactic giant among alien pygmies, then perhaps the film's central triangle would have been more problematic and interesting. But, as it turns out, the interpersonal relationships and jealousies engendered by Chaplin's unscheduled arrival are the most mundane elements of the story. His principal love - an infatuation, incidentally, sprung upon the viewer at a very late stage - is a mute girl, Zethra (Dolores Faith). Along the way he is also tempted by Liara (Coleen Grey), the daughter of Rheton's ruler Sesom (an elderly Francis X. Bushman, here reminiscent of the controller in Plan Nine From Outer Space). The fly in the ointment is Herron (Anthony Dexter), jealous of Chaplin's attractions to his preferred mate. Thus all the worthy speculations of the opening space drama are reduced to an off-world soap opera.

Rheton is a peculiar place, an asteroid-deemed-planet by dramatic contrivance and insistence of its inhabitants. Despite a surfeit of women, there are relatively few people around outside of one or two gatherings. In environmental styling it often reminds one of the early Star Trek, with severe (i.e. cheap) décor, moulded rock faces and limited vistas. But it has its attractions, apart from the feminine majority: for action fans there are the 'disintegrating gravity plates'. These form a key part of a scene where, in echo of Kirk's bare-chested arena battles to be on TV a few years later, Chaplin and Herron fight a duel to the death. They also lead to the demise of the film's principal alien, a stranded representative of Rheton's principal enemies and potential destroyers, the Solarites. Played by none other than Richard 'Jaws' Kiel in monster costume the Solarite is, despite all efforts, relentlessly un-scary and cheap-looking, shambling around before attempting to grope Zethra.

Bad movie lovers will find a lot to enjoy in The Phantom Planet even away from the marauding Solarite terror. The rifle shot sound effects ringing out in space during the climatic space battle for instance; the Solarites' burning cotton wool ball spacecraft (an effect worthy of Edward D. Wood), as well as the earnestness of all involved. Then there's clunking pieces of dialogue. A solemn narrator, heavy on the significance, starts and ends the film. It is he who firsts suggests, with a heavy hint, that there might exist races both larger and smaller than our own, and that mankind might only be "unimportant driftwood... floating in the universe." This faux high manner emerges a few times elsewhere in the film, as when Chaplin's doomed co-pilot speaks directly to camera and informs us solemnly that "Every year of my life I grow more and more convinced that the wisest and best is to fix our attention on the good and the beautiful" - a quote apparently lifted wholesale from a more prestigious source, and here ludicrously self-important. Incidentally, the same speaker is responsible for one of the movie's best moments: during his untimely demise, drifting helplessly off into the void and realising the inevitable, he relaxes calmly and starts off on the Lord's Prayer.

I've given this film an above average score as, for those with a taste for this type of thing The Phantom Planet remains entertaining, if daft. There's an innocence here, typical of the period, which makes up for shortcomings and that's helped along by Marshall's adequate direction. And ultimately I suppose such innocence can be seen as a legitimate response to a universe that has become more confusing and complex a generation on. On the DVD the image is good but, as one might expect, there are few extras.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


7 of 9 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars The Phantom Planet, 4 April 2011
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: The Phantom Planet [DVD] (DVD)
Yes I am a Sci-Fi addict and being a senior citizen I have a keen memory for those early 1950's films which I still think are better than some of the more recent ones. Remakes are very often not so good as those originals . For instance " The day the earth stood still" and "The war of the worlds". The originals were far better inspite of the amazing digital effects which are available today.
"The Phantom Planet" has a good story but shows its age. It would not be classified as one of my favourites. It's more of a curiosity than anything else.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Ridiculous B movie that throughly entertains, 23 Jun 2012
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: The Phantom Planet [DVD] (DVD)
The acting and special effects fight it out for the title of worst on screen presence but it charms and entertains as it goes along. An outrageous story is also the key to it's likability. For the low cost, a real treat for anyone interested in an alternative outer space film. The dialogue is priceless, honestly, lol.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Activate the gravity curtain, 15 Nov 2011
By 
This review is from: The Phantom Planet [DVD] (DVD)
Dean Fredericks (Captain Frank Chapman) and Richard Weber (Lt Makonnen) are sent into space to search for the previous rocket and occupants that seems to have disappeared. They go into the unknown where they come across a meteor shower that damages their ship but only Fredericks survives the repair mission that they undergo, before he and his ship are sucked into the gravitational pull of a large meteorite. Or is it a planet inhabited by tiny people? The majority of the film plays out on this meteorite/planet before Fredericks is picked up by a rescue mission. Has it all been a dream?

The cast are pretty wooden but so what. The film has a nice idea that leaves you thinking at the end. The effects are funny but still entertaining - watch as popcorn threatens the rockets and how about those flying, squeeling pigs? This is a story with a romance that lends itself to a sadness and it creates a romantic tragedy type of film. I thought that this film would be a heap of junk but I was pleasantly surprised. It's nothing great but it's a fantasy type film where everything is certainly real to Dean Fredericks.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Sci Fi 'B' movie, 31 Jan 2014
By 
Mr. Steven Powell (north west UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: The Phantom Planet [DVD] (DVD)
I am a Sci Fi nut so the more 'B' rated the movie the better...if its not good with the plot, you can always have a laugh at the vintage 'special effects'!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Phantom echoes, 10 Aug 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: The Phantom Planet [DVD] (DVD)
It must be 50 years since I saw this film at my local cinema and I still remember the `Shrinking Astronaut' scene. This is typical low budget `B' movie fodder with holes in the plot line that you could drive a bus through! How many astronauts would go EVA without a tether line? Despite the obvious discrepancies this is still an enjoyable early sci-fi adventure I would recommend for a wet Sunday afternoon.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


0 of 2 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Worst film I've ever watched!, 27 July 2012
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: The Phantom Planet [DVD] (DVD)
I don't know anytime when I've watched a more depressing, gloomy and wretched film. Some films are so bad, they're worth watching. The phantom Planet is beyond bad, it has nothing to redeem it. Save your money!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

Phantom Planet [DVD] [2008] [Region 1] [US Import] [NTSC]
1.17
In stock
Add to basket Add to wishlist
Only search this product's reviews