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on 13 April 2003
I originally went to see in the 1960s along with Doctor in Clover. It was shot in black and white and the attraction to a 13year old lad was the fact that the story line was based loosely around his favourite offshore station Radio London.
In terms of a DVD it is not packed to the hilt with extras. It has a simple menu which enables you to view the entire film or separate scenes. It does at least enable you to get to the film without spending an eternity for the restriction notices and film company logos to display. I do think that the manufacturers of DVDs should let you skip the main titles. It is a clear black and white film. The company that produced it is called DD Video and they are located about four to five miles away from the Waffler. It is ironical I had to wait so long for something which was produced on my doorstep.
The film has several clips of the MV Galaxy at sea and the cast transferring to it from Offshore 1 and 2. The Offshore boats were the tenders for the stations which were anchored off the Frinton Essex Coast in the 1960s. The deejay Dale Meredith who has a medium sized part in the film is a young cheery faced actor with a glint in his eye. Sitting at the turntables on board and also standing on stage, he does not look authentic. The glory moment is when he leaves the studio and goes into the sound cubicle and speaks to Kenny Everett. Throughout this film one is reminded that people in pop wore smart clothes, occasionally suits, and almost always jackets.
The film is very dated and extremely low budget. I enjoyed it immensely all the same. Without giving away too much it is about somebody who finds a way of using the Small Faces pop group as a cover for smuggling stolen diamonds out of the country via the Radio London ship.
I am convinced that the ballroom that features in the film is in Watford Hertfordshire. The pond and the timber frames on the side of nearby buildings give it away. I believe in the film it is intended to be somewhere in Essex.
The first thing that struck me was the face and voice of Lester Benson, the manager of the Small Faces in the film. I have just checked it out and it is none other than Ray Hilton who has been in the soap opera in the UK called Brookside. If you are not a soap opera afficiando he was also Marty Hopkirk in Randall and Hopkirk. He also had a starring role in That was the Week That was. He has had a very successful professional career as writer and performer. He created Striker and wrote The Squirrels and Thinumybob. He has guested in Last of the Summer Wine, Bergerac, Touch of Frost, Doctor Who and the Avengers and many more television programmes. He played Norman in Rumpole of the Bailey.
Mrs Edgecombe who is played by Patsy Rowlands is one of the Carry On film cast and plays here role as a witness to the crime in Hatton Garden comically. Well that is how it looked to me.
The music in the film is not particularly good or bad. The Small Faces appear singing a song I do not remember, and Stevie Marriott looks so incredibly young. I found the group the Chantelles so incredibly dated. Just wait until you see them visit Big L ship and walk into the studio with Dusty Springfield hair-dos and embroidered trouser suits with A-shaped tunic tops. Coupled with the false eyelashes and smiles and pouting lips, balanced by the grins of the fake deejay Dale Meredith I was rolling in my seat with laughter. We do get to see Kiki Dee singing a simple ballad in the film - and the black and white reveals her teenage complexion a treat!
Major Fairclough, the baddie in the film, refers to a photocopy as a photostat. The police car is a Morris Oxford with a ringing bell. Another not to miss section is near the end when the CID officer and man from Dutch police stand outside the ball room with an oversize walkie talkie. None of this film is intended to be funny, maybe light hearted, but progress in the technological world has been tremendous.
I recommend this film to any offshore radio and sixties fan. I am waiting for the "Not So Jolly Roger" Danger Man episode based on the Red Sands Fort to come out but the release of this is as exciting. I watched it in three sections over three sandwich breaks at lunchtime, and enjoyed every minute. I will be watching it again and again. The running time is about 73 minutes and it is in good quality black and white.
The DVD cover is very poor at giving any details about the film or cast so I will list the information in full here:
Released 1966
Director: Jeremy Summers
Writers: Tudor Gates based on an idea by Harold Shampan
Producer: Harry Benn
Cinematography: Stephen Dade.
Editing Sidney Stone.
Music Composer; Johnny Douglas.
Cast:
William Lucas - Major Fairclough; Kenneth Cope - Lester Benson; George Mikell - Pal Verlekt; Conrad Phillips - Tom Jenkins; Patsy Rowlands - Mrs Edgecombe, Burnell Tucker - Dale Meredith; Anna Cartaret - Gay Jenkins; Vanda Godsell - Mrs Jenkins; Gertan Klauber - Meverhop; Doel Luscombe - Assistant Commisioner; Peter Sander - Spankharen; Geoffrey Lumsden - Army Officer Ronald Bridges - Garage Attendant; David Kirk - Dock Policeman; Small Faces; Kiki Dee; Chantelles; Kenny Everett.
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on 17 November 2006
Anyone buying this dvd purely because The Small Faces appear in the film should be made aware that the scenes in which they appear are few and far between.

There is a short clip at the start of the film of them getting out of a van, another clip later on where they are doing a photo session and the best footage appears right at the end of the film where they are on stage but this probably lasts for less than a minute. The line up of the group includes Jimmy Winston who was later replaced by Ian McLagan. The boys have non speaking parts and much of the music is in the background.

The film itself is no better than average though quite nostalgic for anyone who grew up during the sixties when roads were relatively quiet compared to now and when offshore radio stations were broadcasting freely.

There is enough of a plot to make the film worth watching but not sufficient footage of The Small Faces if that is the prime reason for purchasing the dvd.
0Comment|15 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 5 April 2003
In terms of a DVD it is not packed to the hilt with extras. It has a simple menu which enables you to view the entire film or separate scenes. It does at least enable you to get to the film without spending an eternity for the restriction notices and film company logos to display. It is a clear black and white film.
The film has several clips of the MV Galaxy at sea and the cast transferring to it from Offshore 1 and 2. The Offshore boats were the tenders for the stations which were anchored off the Frinton Essex Coast in the 1960s. The deejay Dale Meredith who has a medium sized part in the film is a young cheery faced actor with a glint in his eye. Sitting at the turntables on board and also standing on stage, he does not look authentic. The glory moment is when he leaves the studio and goes into the sound cubicle and speaks to Kenny Everett. Throughout this film one is reminded that people in pop wore smart clothes, occasionally suits, and almost always jackets.
The film is very dated and extremely low budget. I enjoyed it immensely all the same. Without giving away too much it is about somebody who finds a way of using the Small Faces pop group as a cover for smuggling stolen diamonds out of the country via the Radio London ship.
The first thing that struck me was the face and voice of Lester Benson, the manager of the Small Faces in the film. I have just checked it out and it is none other than Ray Hilton who played Norman in Rumpole of the Bailey.
Mrs Edgecombe who is played by Patsy Rowlands is one of the Carry On film cast and plays here role as a witness to the crime in Hatton Garden comically. Well that is how it looked to me.
The music in the film is not particularly good or bad. The Small Faces appear singing a song I do not remember, and Stevie Marriott looks so incredibly young. I found the group the Chantelles so incredibly dated. Just wait until you see them visit Big L ship and walk into the studio with Dusty Springfield hair-dos and embroidered trouser suits with A-shaped tunic tops. Coupled with the false eyelashes and smiles and pouting lips, balanced by the grins of the fake deejay Dale Meredith I was rolling in my seat with laughter. We do get to see Kiki Dee singing a simple ballad in the film - and the black and white reveals her teenage complexion a treat!
Major Fairclough, the baddie in the film, refers to a photocopy as a photostat. The police car is a Morris Oxford with a ringing bell. Another not to miss section is near the end when the CID officer and man from Dutch police stand outside the ball room with an oversize walkie talkie. None of this film is intended to be funny, maybe light hearted, but progress in the technological world has been tremendous.
I recommend this film to any offshore radio and sixties fan. I watched it in three sections over three sandwich breaks at lunchtime, and enjoyed every minute. I will be watching it again and again. The running time is about 73 minutes and it is in good quality black and white.
The DVD cover is very poor at giving any details about the film or cast so I will list the information in full here:
Released 1966
Director: Jeremy Summers
Writers: Tudor Gates based on an idea by Harold Shampan
Producer: Harry Benn
Cinematography: Stephen Dade.
Editing Sidney Stone.
Music Composer; Johnny Douglas.
Cast:
William Lucas - Major Fairclough; Kenneth Cope - Lester Benson; George Mikell - Pal Verlekt; Conrad Phillips - Tom Jenkins; Patsy Rowlands - Mrs Edgecombe, Burnell Tucker - Dale Meredith; Anna Cartaret - Gay Jenkins; Vanda Godsell - Mrs Jenkins; Gertan Klauber - Meverhop; Doel Luscombe - Assistant Commisioner; Peter Sander - Spankharen; Geoffrey Lumsden - Army Officer Ronald Bridges - Garage Attendant; David Kirk - Dock Policeman; Small Faces; Kiki Dee; Chantelles; Kenny Everett.
0Comment|8 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
A good mix of location filming and a sound storyline makes this 1960s black and white second feature very watchable. Director Jeremy Summers brings pace and fun to this production which is packed full with well known faces no pun intended!
The stars of the drama are William Lucas, Conrad Phillips and Kenneth Cope all 3 well known film and television faces of the time. Conrad Phillips wife is played by Vanda Godsell who had the market in such roles cornered for many years. If I saw she was in a film or tv show I knew it would be good and I was usually right.
The Small Faces, The Chantelles, Kiki Dee, Mark Richardson and Rey Anton and Pro Forma provide the sounds. The picture quality is good and likewise the sound is clear.
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on 15 May 2003
Any fan of 60's nostalgia has to own this film. It is so awful it is wonderful. The acting skills of most of the cast is dire, with the exception of Kenneth Cope and Conrad Phillips, and the then almost child-like Kenny Everett is delight see.
The plot centers around a baddie using the pirate radio station Radio London as drop off point for diamond smugglng between England and Holland.
The exterior shots of the mv Galaxy are dramatic - though no offshore radio ship operated with such lavish studios.
The music performed by both Kiki Dee an The Small Faces is totally forgettable, but that said - Dateline Diamonds is a GEM.
Todd Slaughter
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on 25 January 2012
Great for a nostalgic look at the pirate radio ships of the 1960s. Some scenes were filmed on Radio London's ship. After watching the film "The Boat That Rocked", I wanted to see something more realistic regarding pirate radio. This film will probably only appeal to people who actually remember the 1960s pirate radio stations. A real trip down memory lane!
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on 1 December 2011
A must have :) The music bits are worth having it for if nothing else, good fun thou, great 60s feel to the whole film :)
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on 13 October 2015
Great old Black and Whitey! filmed amazingly aboard good old Radio London! . And featuring the Small faces as criminals ! Great film Buy it now.. guess it was banned originally ?
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on 1 September 2015
OK, not great. Bought it because I'm a sixties radio anorak. If you're hoping for a great film, don't bother, just watch old rock and roll films on satellite TV.
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on 15 November 2014
You have to be a dedicated Small Faces fan - I am - to appreciate the nostalgia here. If you're not a fan, this film probably not for you.
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